crime

Russian breaks koban glass, hoping to be sent home

47 Comments

Police have arrested a Russian man who smashed the glass on a koban (police box) in Tokyo's Shinagawa Ward.

The suspect was quoted by police as saying he was broke and thought he would be deported back to Russia if he committed a crime, TV Asahi reported Saturday.

According to police, the 35-year-old Russian, who has no fixed address or job, threw a tool at the glass window of the koban just after noon on Dec 4. Police said he only had 8 yen on him when he was arrested.

The Russian told police he had lost his job at a bar about a week ago and had been sleeping in the terminal at Haneda Airport since then.

© Japan Today

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

47 Comments
Login to comment

Kawaiso, let him go home.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Indeed kawaiso , better stay at Haneda till the summer rather than freezing in Russia

4 ( +5 / -1 )

He might just end up in the slammer alongside all those ojiisans who wanted a roof and three hot meals everyday.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

I believe if you are deported it's at your own expense.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

'At own expense' but he's only got 8 yen. Can't he just ask to be deported?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

I think ir will be better for him in a Japanese jail than go home. He will have meals, and at least inside of building. Cold Russia. Maybe he willl be assigned as Russian interpreter in Japanese Justcie Dept.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

In cases where the person cannot bear the cost of deportation, the Japanese government pays.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

In cases where the person cannot bear the cost of deportation, the Japanese government pays.

It's probably cheaper to buy him a plane ticket than lock him up anyway. Send him to the closest Russian airport, short flight = cheap

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Interesting, one week of no job and that person went homeless. He will not do good anywhere around the world.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Wonder if he tried going to his embassy? Would they have helped him get home with a loan? I have also heard deportation flight costs are borne by the deportee but there are surely cases where they are unable to pay. I'm thinking I've heard the respective embassies pay and then try to get the money from the person later after they have returned home. But I don't know if that applies to all countries.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Send him to the closest Russian airport, short flight = cheap

Flights from Japan (Niigata?) to Vladivostok are not cheap! I was interested in visiting the Russian Far East but was put off by the airfares.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Give him a sea kayak, push him towards the northern islands that Russia claims?

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Send him out in that vagina kayak, good idea KirinLager, along with it's owner.

Educator60: It is my understanding you are held accountable for your deportation air ticket by your government, upon your return. They will throw him in the slammer to pay it off when he gets back, working for ¥25 a month, no doubt.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Russian breaks koban glass, hoping to be sent home

And he has no family that will send him cash to go home? Or how about heading to the Russian embassy and asking for help or is Russia that broke that it can't help it's citizens get home?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Some pretty heartless comments above on the dire situation this man found himself in. Just a single comment or suggestion on how he could be helped. In a foreign country, no one to turn to and down to his last 8 yen. I'd like to think if I had came across him I would have at least given him a meal and a bed for the night and sent him on his way with a few notes in his pocket.

11 ( +13 / -3 )

" I believe if you are deported it's at your own expense. "

Which in his case means, at the cost of 8 yen?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@SimonB: If rhis stiry goes on newsoaoer, I think Japan Inc which trade with Russia will recruit mhim, Not easy to find Russian native speaking people/ He might miss his homeland but better than homeless in aaport. Look t international trading companies. They tend to employ goreign language speaking people. They already have English speaking people. This Russian was desperate without job.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

In cases where the person cannot bear the cost of deportation, the Japanese government pays.

In other words, the Japanese taxpayer pays.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Given the current state of the rouble, eight yen would probably pay for a first-class seat on a Flight to Moscow with Aeroflot....

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Think about it this way.... it would probably be much cheaper if they just book him a one way ticket to the nearest Russian Intl Airport. Then ban him any re-entry for life.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In principle, every foreigner in Japan should have a guarantor (hoshonin), it can be a private citizen or a company / organization. Hoshonin is responsible for the person he / she / it invites to Japan. In case of lack of funds for deportation basically the hoshonin should provide the money and later settle the matter with the person he / she / it guarantee for.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

In principle, every foreigner in Japan should have a guarantor (hoshonin), it can be a private citizen or a company / organization.

What nonsense. The Japanese guarantor system is ridiculous to begin with and should be abolished. If it's such a brilliant idea, how is it that the banks managed to lose so much money after the bubble?

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

In cases where the person cannot bear the cost of deportation, the Japanese government pays.

And an invoice would be attached to the person after long detention at the immigration center.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

CrazyJoe Dec. 07, 2014 - 08:59AM JST

In cases where the person cannot bear the cost of deportation, the Japanese government pays.

I'd like to know when that policy changed. My friend was asked to purchase a ticket direct to an individuals country of nationality. The other guy had served out his sentence in a Japanese prison for possession of marijuana and was sent to Tokyo Immigration detention center afterwards since his VISA had expired while serving his sentence. He had no family back home and his embassy refused to assist him and spent nearly four months in the detention center until a one-way direct flight was arranged for him. The Japanese authorities refused to assist him in any way and told him to have family arrange his flight but when he informed them he had no family he was told "Shikata ga nai". If it hadn't been for my friend, who by chance learned of his plight, and who purchased a VERY costly one-way ticket back to Europe he might still be in the detention center today.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

This is sad...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

..he could just asked nicely. hopefully nobody was hurt when he did his act.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yes, it is a little heartless for society here if they do lock him up. If everyone in this forum pitched in a few yen we could help him somehow return to his home country. Sadly many people coming to Japan do not have the proper support here to help them and think coming to Japan means easy money.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

they will ask the rissian embassy to psy, if they tegise he will have a very unpleasant life in detention. its not a nice way to go.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He got lucky. Soapy tried many ways without success.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There are literally hundreds of other ways to leave Japan other than committing a crime. You could ask at the docks about working passage on a Russian ship, carry bags at the airport and explain your situation to travelers and ask for assistance (100 bags a day at 100yen each = 10 000yen a day), he could approach the airline companies - often they have plenty of spare seats and he might be able to work something out (e.g. work for them to pay off his ticket, either in Japan or back in Russia) - but many might be prepared to write it off as a PR stunt, go and talk to the immigration office and find out his options, etc. etc. etc.

I feel sorry for the guy, and he was obviously desperate and not thinking straight, but he's probably landed himself in an even worse mess now than if he'd just gone down to the immigration office and said, "Look, I've lost my job and don't have enough money for a ticket home. What are my options and how does deportation work?".

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Educator60, the Russian embassy probably gave him the advice to commit a crime, save themselves a few roubles :-)

4 ( +7 / -3 )

The best way is to charm a lovely Japanese lady... she might lend you the money... and more fun than spending time in a Japanese detention center.

Of course you have to pay the money back.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Put him in some Japanese classes if he doesn't know Japanese already. He can:

Be a matchmaker for Russian women and old Japanese divorcees

A translator for hostesses

If he gets really good at Japanese, be the interpreter for Abe and Putin when discussing the disputed islands

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

If you are stranded totally broke and don't have anyone back home who can wire you some money, the consulate of some nations or consular section of the embassy will, on occasion lend you some money and get you back home. This is called a repatriation loan and its availability depends on how much money they have at the time you request it. In very exceptional circumstances some consulates may led you some money from public funds which you will have to pay back. Some credit companies will also wire you money, bring a card within 24 hours to your hotel or otherwise help you. Most are very willing to help you if you're valued customer. If you have friends in the country in which you're stranded, they may be willing to help you navigate through problems, or lend you money. It's always a help to have friends in many places.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He's in a predicament! Maybe out of the fire and into the frying pan scenario here.

No friends, associates whatever? Savings finished in a week? I wonder what he did to lose his job, and seemingly ostracized.

It's great that no one is using racial slurs here, and damning/condemning him.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Don't forget he has to pay for the broken window, as well.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

He's 35 not 7! Hardly a victim.

Russia will repatriate him. Upon arriving in Russia his passport will be confiscated and the salary of whatever job he gets in Russia will be garnished until the cost of repatriation is paid.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@crazy, four months in the detention, thats the crazy thing, japanee gov would prefer to keep people in a detention center tha pay there fair back to there home countries. ittl cost a lot more to keep somebody in detention for 4 months than a free plane ticket.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Flights? Come again? Ferry. Bye. Or just drop off onto a fishing boat off Hokkaido. Easy.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Have now read this news in Japanese and they phrase it as him having quit (not lost) his job at a bar a week ago and as having consulted immigration (at the airport?), telling them he wanted to return to Russia. None of the articles mention what kind of visa, if any, he had for Japan, how long he had been here, nor whether he has any Jspanese language skills.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

why not go to the russian embassy and get a ticket back

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

You're confusing an embassy with a travel agent.

Embassies exist to promote trade and diplomacy between nations and to offer a degree of consular assistance for its nationals. It won't wave a magic wand and make all of this man child's problems go away. At 35 people should really have learnt to face up to their responsibilities.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Can't the embassy help out in situations like these?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What innit said.

35-year-old

Old enough to know better and have more than 8 yen. Make him work for his fare, then send him home.

Can't the embassy help out in situations like these?

Mine doesn't. In fact they make it perfectly clear. Sound policy.

Don't go overseas if you can't handle it.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

FrungyDec. 07, 2014 - 07:45PM JST There are literally hundreds of other ways to leave Japan other than committing a crime

Do you honestly believe even ten people would willingly let a stranger take their bags and PAY MONEY for it?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Just out of curiosity here, how was he living here in the first place? What was his visa status?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Just approach Russian Embassy for him.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites