crime

Shinjuku Ward official accused of stealing personal items from unclaimed bodies

16 Comments

Police are investigating a man in his 40s, who is a supervisor at the Shinjuku Ward office in Tokyo, on suspicion of theft and embezzlement after he took home the personal belongings of numerous unidentified and unclaimed deceased persons, including cash, credit cards and bank books, without permission from the ward. 

According to police, the supervisor is in charge of managing the belongings of the deceased and arranging their cremations, Sankei Shimbun reported on Friday. Unclaimed or unidentifiable bodies are called 行旅死亡人 (deceased travelers) in Japanese.

Upon questioning by police, the suspect explained that he had taken the items home because storing them at the office is troublesome. 

The case came to light after another ward office employee contacted police and said the suspect was taking items from corpses.

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16 Comments
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Stealing from dead people is never going to make you popular, how low can you sink? did he steal belonging knowing, believing that no one would find out?

8 ( +8 / -0 )

SICK.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Upon questioning by police, the suspect explained that he had taken the items home because storing them at the office is troublesome. 

This statement makes sense, kind of. However, if he had used any of the cash or items his arrest is warranted.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Scum of the scum stealing from the dead...

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Hopefully it’s ‘former’ supervisor at the ward office.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

without permission from the ward. 

Does this mean that if he had asked the ward office they could possibly have said yes, and, if so, that it would be legal?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

One would think the credit cards and bank books would possibly lead to identification of the deceased although not necessarily to finding anyone to claim the body....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Stealing from dead bodies is insane.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I can see how this could start as convenience like he said and eventually spiral into stealing once he realized that no one noticed.

Bad decision either way!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

because storing them at the office is troublesome. 

Ha, what a lame excuse!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Is stealing from the dead actually worse than stealing from the alive? Please explain to the unoutraged...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Hey, what was that "Japan is the most honest country in the world" YouTube video? I'll post this on the comments section... and this is only one person who was caught.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Upon questioning by police, the suspect explained that he had taken the items home because storing them at the office is troublesome.

What, so now his own home is a warehouse, is it?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

As an ex police officer I know that a deceased person's money and belongings has a terrible ingrained smell of death affixed to it. Anybody stealing such death stinking materials knows it's wrong just via the smell. A truly horrible thing to do to rob the dead. An earlier poster said is it any worst than robbing the living...it's probably as bad, but if you rob the dead you get the smell. Where and how will you ever enjoy that money and property?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

another dirty official that's why Japanese refer to them as tax thieves

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@MARK - totally agree - nothing less than this individual is SICK in his mind and perhaps those whom employed him need to be closely reviewed too, as they too should share some blame.

I feel sorry for those Families that he has trespassed upon (for loss of better words). Is there a "Grave Robbery" Law in Japan ? If so, perhaps he could be prosecuted under such a Law.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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