crime

Sony says 25 million more accounts hacked

24 Comments

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24 Comments
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I've little sympathy for Sony after their actions in recent years. First they put rootkit software on their CDs, leaving millions of PCs open to hackers. Then they forced PlayStation owners to choose between keeping the functionality of the PlayStation they bought (e.g. linux support) and being able to use the PlayStation network. Then they sued those who tried to restore the features Sony had removed.

It's about time Sony were punished for their heavy-handed bullying. I doubt they will change, but I won't be buying any of their products until they do.

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Pretty funny stuff.

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You have unlocked the achievement "Hacked"!

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it won't be long till barcodes or chips or (...) will be imprinted on humans with all their information.

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I literally have no comment.

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get ready for an even deeper bow from Sony's prez, maybe it will cause him to slam his head against the desk so something decent might come out, like you know, taking the gobs of money you take in every day and investing it into a security system.

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C'mon, let's look at the bright side: how many accounts weren't hacked?

Oh - that few? Well, I guess it's a good lesson for all of you.

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Apple and Microsoft must learn how to prevent a recurrence of this kind of attack on their own systems. This incident must be dissected and studied globally, and immediate steps taken to assure user security. In the meanwhile, Sony products are obviously not what they once were years ago. Why buy them?

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Chamade.

Sony PSN servers run on Unix servers like the majority of Internet servers, they are not a Sony product.

Microsoft and Apple won't take any steps as they are superior and thus can't be hacked. :p j/k of course as microsoft software and netserves got more security holes than swiss cheese.

Let me assure you that they hackers will soon try Nintendo with their new services for the 3DS, etc.

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Someone had already made a clever Hitler parody of the Sony breach. Can't say I'm a gaming Otaku so they don't have my data, though I do hope Google, Amazon and Rakuten tighten things up and take care

Seen elsewhere....They got poached Sony side up......

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The upshot of this (and countless other incidents) is that the convenient "cashless society" has become a dangerous pipe-dream. Security is nearly nil, and ID thieves can clean you out, create new accounts and clean THEM out, and leave YOU stuck with all the bills far far TOO easily nowadays. Neither banks or governments can, or seem to want to, do anything about it.

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The upshot of this (and countless other incidents) is that the convenient "cashless society" has become a dangerous pipe-dream.

Nah. It just needs better security, that's all. Every failure is a learning experience.

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Still have my old Sony waterproof walkman that they advertised you can 'take in the shower' with you. Not sure what they intended you clip it to, but still... it's clear they've gotten far too big for their britches, and have abused the customer for the product.

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Which is why you want to store data spread over a cluster of encrypted servers. Break up the data into 3 or more pieces and have them stored in different data centres across the globe. If you hack one of them you only have an incomprehensible jumble of numbers and letters.

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Very profound comment Cwhite. What was with the has and not being able to see as exposed text? Was that the extent of the security model they were using? No wonder it was hacked.

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Zenny 11 -- will you give it a rest? You have been trying to defend Sony for days on this -- like theorizing that the delay in coming clean on the original 77 million account leaks was somehow related to Sony setting a trap for the hacker. And now it turns out they also got hacked on a completely different network for an additional 25 million accounts, including credit card data. This was pure incompetence, compounded by the J-management practice of stalling on coming clean immediately. The result of which is that millions have lost faith in Sony, which will potentially damage their brand/business model irreperably, and has already cost in billions in market value as it stock has plunged.

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This was pure incompetence, compounded by the J-management practice of stalling on coming clean immediately.

Nice, Japanese culture is now to blame, not malicious hackers. Of course, foreign-managed corporations would never delay releasing bad news, except ALL THE TIME. Like how Microsoft took years to acknowledge there were design and reliability issues with the 360, even though everybody's was failing!

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herefornow.

Yeah, yeah. 2 points.

1.) Only people slamming don't need to give it a rest, am I right here. 2.) Don't mix up which poster said what. 3.) I don't think you are a mod and thus don't have the right to tell people when to shut up, i know some posters here like to do that. 4.) Again as was said hundred times before posters should attack the message and NOT the messenger. Feel free to point out flaws in my statements don't just vent because you disagree.

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Smorkian -- try reading beyond just JT. It might keep you from making this kind of comment. The fact is that a number of foreign news sources/papers, a couple of which were re-printed in yesterday's Daily Yomiuri, are saying the exact same thing I said. And, they reference Toyota and other J-companies (TEPCO) mis-handlings of problem situations and the culture here to react and not get ahead of situations. (One said they are suffering from second-rate PR.) The issue here is not other companies/cultures. The issue here is that Sony unfortuantely fell into the trap of managers not wanting to share bad news and keeping everything overly compartmentalized. Which, again, unfortunately, is all too common among J-companies. As a result, brands can be severely damaged, and billions in investment and future profits lost. And, part of this stems from the fact that Japanese managers only believe they work for their company/bucho and not the shareholders. The concept of fiduciary responsibility is not well developed here.

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Zenny11 -- if I inderstood your numbers 1 and 2 I might be able to respond. As to point three, I did not tell you to "shut up". Just asked if you need to keep kicking the dead horse you are trying to get us all to buy. And, my post does attack the message, not the messenger. (You might want to reread it.) Maybe you just don't like that it points out how weak the message is, so you are making it personal.

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herefornow - you sure get personal quickly. Do you have some issues with me?

I do read other sources all the time. In fact, let me quote from the article in the Yomiuri you just mentioned:

Japanese companies have come under fire overseas lately for their methods of disclosing unfavorable information. Toyota Motor Corp. was criticized for its handling of massive recalls, and Tokyo Electric Power Co. has been censured for its information disclosure in connection with the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

U.S. and European media have called Japanese companies weak, with Reuters saying in an article from Tokyo: "Blessed with first-rate technology that helps them compete around the world, Japanese corporations are sometimes hobbled by second-rate public relations."

You'll notice the criticism comes from MEDIA. It's shocking that media might be off base or reactionary on something, I know. Critical reading will also note nothing in there of this being a uniquely Japanese problem, just that some Japanese corporations lately have had similar problems. But you can just as easily point out - as I did regarding the similar recent PR disaster for Microsoft - many, many other foreign companies with the same problems. Does BP ring a bell?

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I wish they would just turn the thing back on already. Anyone who has not canceled their CC at this point deserves to get robbed. And I deserve to have my games back.

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Sony's going down the tubes for this one. Oh, only 25 million "more" accounts hacked. Nah, nah, nah, nah, say goodbye.

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|| The upshot of this (and countless other incidents) is that the convenient "cashless society" has become a dangerous pipe-dream.

|Nah. It just needs better security, that's all. Every failure is a learning experience.

"Better security" ? If it existed, and was user-friendly enough for people to tolerate, it would already be in use.

And then someone would find a way around it ... a lot quicker than you'd think.

Time to seriously re-think e-commerce, billions and trillions of (pick a currency) are at clear risk. The large interests can afford insurance and/or expensive measures to protect themselves and recover losses ... but you and I cannot. The "little guy" will always lose this game.

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