crime

Stalker hid in closet at girl's home before killing her

75 Comments

More details emerged Thursday about the murder of an 18-year-old school girl who was fatally stabbed in Mitaka, Tokyo, on Tuesday night, allegedly by an ex-boyfriend who was stalking her.

Charles Thomas Ikenaga, 21, who is from Kyoto, has been charged with the murder of Saaya Suzuki, whom he met on Facebook two years ago. The couple dated until about a year ago.

Suzuki first asked her school principal for advice on Oct 4 after she received email death threats from Ikenaga. The principal advised her to contact the police. Suzuki and her parents visited police at around 9 a.m. Tuesday to report that Ikenaga had loitered outside their home several times and turned up at places where she used to go, after she started blocking his emails and phone calls on her cell phone in June.

The police officer who spoke with them called Ikenaga’s cell phone three times Tuesday, but his calls were not answered, police said.

NHK reported Thursday that during police questioning, Ikenaga said that he climbed up the outside of Suzuki's house on Tuesday afternoon and hid in a downstairs closet for about two hours. Suzuki returned home at around 4:30 p.m., at which time a police officer called her to see if she had got home safely. She said she was OK and they spoke for about 20 minutes.

Ikenaga told police he emerged from the closet after the phone call and stabbed Suzuki twice in the stomach and arm near the front door, NHK reported. When Suzuki ran outside, Ikenaga chased her and jumped on top of her, stabbing her in the neck. A witness saw him flee the scene.

Suzuki was taken to hospital where she died a short time later due to loss of blood, police said. Ikenaga was arrested nearby 90 minutes later. He admitted buying a knife with the intention of killing Suzuki because she wouldn't get back together with him, police said.

On Thursday, police searched Ikenaga's home in Kyoto and questioned his mother. Ikenaga reportedly called his mother after attacking Suzuki but details of that conversation have not been divulged.

Meanwhile, police have been criticized for their handling of the case. Police said that when Suzuki and her parents visited them on the morning of her murder, it was the first time they had been consulted.

Under the new stalking law, police have to first give an oral warning to stalkers, then a written warning if they do not stop. Police said the officer who made the three calls to Ikenaga's cell phone did so because Ikenaga had no fixed address in Tokyo and there was no way to know where he was at that time.

Police also asked Suzuki to bring copies of emails that Ikenaga had sent her so they could prepare to file a criminal complaint if he did not stop stalking her.

However, the time between Suzuki's visit to the police on Tuesday morning and her death in the afternoon was too short for authorities to do anything, an analyst told NHK. He said the anti-stalking law has to be strengthened so that police can take immediate action against stalkers because warnings often enrage them even more.

National Police Agency Commissioner Tsuyoshi Yoneda told a news conference that a thorough investigation will be carried out see if the police could have done more to protect Suzuki and to take measures to prevent such crimes from happening again.

© Japan Today

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

75 Comments
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Sad. Truly sad.

I'm not sure there is really anything more police can do in a situation such as this. Other than, of course, educate the populace on stalking, and how to potential victims can protect themselves.

We got two dogs. When we come home, we know if anything is amiss.

17 ( +18 / -1 )

However, the time between Suzuki’s visit to the police on Tuesday morning and her death in the afternoon was too short for authorities to do anything, an analyst told NHK. He said the anti-stalking law has to be strengthened so that police can take immediate action against stalkers because warnings often enrage them even more.

On the flip side, NHK also reported the day before that between 80-90z%, the stalkers quit after verbal warning from the police as per the lawyer who assisted in drafting the current law.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Under the new stalking law, police have to first give an oral warning to stalkers, then a written warning if they do not stop.

What a stooopid law! What is this verbal the written warning crap? You think a crazy person is going to listen that?? They should put a restraining order on the stalker first. If he breaks the order, then arrest him.

-1 ( +8 / -8 )

Can't see the point of arguing about policies and procedures. The girl's dead. The guy who did it is nuts. Tragedies happen, and in this case, the nutcase won. Awful thing to think, or say, but truth often hurts. I feel for her parents, relatives and friends, and can only hope the 'system' locks up the loony for a long, long time.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

What a stooopid law! What is this verbal the written warning crap? You think a crazy person is going to listen that?? They should put a restraining order on the stalker first. If he breaks the order, then arrest him.

You think a restraining order will stop the same crazy person?

11 ( +12 / -1 )

You think a restraining order will stop the same crazy person?

@Spudman--If the girl and family had gone to the police and gotten it sooner, yes! The reason is because when a person is found to have violated a restraining order, the police can now arrest and jail him for a time, no problem. It gives the police some clear evidence to work with, and then it puts the nut in a cell.

Of course it won't work every time, but what is ever perfect? Only a combination of methods will solve very complex problems like stalking.

Anyway, I am just waiting for someone to ask why there was not a policeman in her closet to prevent all this. (sigh)

3 ( +7 / -4 )

You think a restraining order will stop the same crazy person?

Better than nothing. It at least gives the police the power to arrest the person.

Still, valid point. Though this:

On the flip side, NHK also reported the day before that between 80-90z%, the stalkers quit after verbal warning from the police as per the lawyer who assisted in drafting the current law.

if true, is actually pretty encouraging. I imagine its easier to stop things early, and gets increasingly hard to do so as time goes on.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Actually, I'm pretty sure that the School Principal (or any other teacher) would be bound by law in Australia to report the girl's complaint to the police under 'Mandatory Reporting' laws that exist there, as opposed to a 'do it yourself' approach.

I think it's a shocking case of the vulnerable and defenceless being completely let down by support networks that are meant to protect them.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@Spudman--If the girl and family had gone to the police and gotten it sooner, yes! The reason is because when a person is found to have violated a restraining order, the police can now arrest and jail him for a time, no problem. It gives the police some clear evidence to work with, and then it puts the nut in a cell.

The guy was living in Kyoto. He went to Tokyo to kill her. R.O. would accomplish what exactly other than to tack on the violation of R.O. on top of the murder charges?

3 ( +8 / -5 )

I think it's a shocking case of the vulnerable and defenceless being completely let down by support networks that are meant to protect them.

The complaint was made in the morning and 7 hours later she was dead. Are you blaming her parents for not moving house? Do the police have an obligation to arrest and detain all and any stalker stalker suspects immediately?

8 ( +8 / -0 )

I've also heard the discussion Nigelboy refers to, they said the vast majority quit after a call from the police. Apparently they call from the girl's phone, the guy happily answers, then a scary police voice tells him that he is on their watching list, they know everything about him and if he ever tries to approach her again he will immediately be arrested. Most of the guys quit, but there will always be some sickos who don't care about consequences. How to identify these is the problem

11 ( +11 / -0 )

As a victim of a few stalkers, most do stop once authorities get involved but I had one that didnt for a long time. Thankfully he never learned where I lived. I pray for the family and friends of the girl who died. I hope the guy who killed her get punished.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Unfortunately, this is one case where there was just not enough time for the police to be able to do anything to prevent the murder. When the victim and her parents went to the police for the first time that morning, the stalker had already woven his web and made his plans. Even if an officer had escorted her home after school, I doubt he would have gone inside and looked in all the closets and under the beds. No one could have foreseen that.

The only way this crime could have been prevented would have been if someone had seen the guy climbing up the side of the house and entering through the 2nd-floor window. Then they could have reported a break-in to police.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Beta + finally got a girl friend + broken up -> become stalker, familiar pattern. in other news, some guy just flied 7000 miles to stab his ex with a fork.

This wouldn't happen if these desperate guys had learn some game instead of cling to the past.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Poor poor girl. What the police did or should've done doesnt matter anymore, its too late for her.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

This criminal must never return to society again.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The father should have taken a few weeks off work and stuck to his daughter like glue until this POS was brought to the police for questioning. Personally, after the first death threat came, the father should have put this punk down.....permanently.

Too bad a girly looking guy like him couldn't be sent to an American Max security prison. Then he'll wish he was dead.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Yesterday, so many posters on this site felt right in criticizing the police, with the incomplete information given. Now that we have more information, we find out the police did what they were supposed to. I hope those same posters are on the other side of that fence someday so they can understand how it feels to be prematurely and incorrectly judged by those who don't know what they are talking about.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Even though we have more information, so many red flags still appear. They have been dating for 2 years. That would have made her 16 at the time and him 19. Sure they are both teenagers, but the guy is a man at that time like it or not. Why is he still hanging around teenagers, and where were the parents when their daughter was dating an adult when he reached 20 and she was 17 and still living at home?

How was this guy able to hide in a house for so long? I guess no one was there during the day and how long did he hide?

Police did what they could in this case, and I hate to say it but the ones that could have done something more would have been the parents, when they found out that the guy was harassing their daughter and waiting too late to start the process, based on this and the previous reports.

-7 ( +1 / -9 )

If this guy really wanted to kill this girl he would have found a way somehow, with or without a restraining order. In this case in particular I don't think the Jpolice could have done much more than they did.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Spudman

The complaint was made in the morning and 7 hours later she was dead.

Yep, which just goes to show how serious it was.

Are you blaming her parents for not moving house?

No. Are you?

Do the police have an obligation to arrest and detain all and any stalker stalker suspects immediately?

I don't know, but they certainly have a responsibility to take the complaint deadly seriously and protect the girl from possible harm - so they could have done things like: Gone to her house and set up a watch, scoured the area (including the house) or staked it out to see if the guy would show up, even put her in a safe place for a while. Remember, the guy was threatening to kill her. He had stated it clearly.

Not thorough enough. Not good enough.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

There's a lot of girls out there in Japan that he could have dated as well. Being 21 years old doesn't mean the end of your life. Now he will spend the rest of his life in prison and possibly get the death penalty as well.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Now that we have more information, we find out the police did what they were supposed to.

We always knew they did what they were "supposed to do". The problem is this is not enough. Sometimes you have to use common sense. They say they had no idea where he would be since he has no fixed address in Tokyo. That is a laugh because the family already said he was lurking around their house.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

"where were the parents when their daughter was dating an adult when he reached 20 and she was 17 and still living at home?"

Most people include teenagers won't tell their parents who they are dating normally unless their parents know their partners, I has some experiences

And nothing wrong with 17 years old dating 20 years old, men like young girls whether you like it or not, the problem is not the age, the problem is the wrong person.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

sounds like Snake from Metal Gear Solid.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Charles Thomas Ikenaga, 21, who is from Kyoto..... He's Japanese or gaijin?

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

>They say they had no idea where he would be since he has no fixed address in Tokyo. That is a laugh because the family already said he was lurking around their house.

And the family, knowing he would be lurking around the house, went out leaving a window open.

they (the police) certainly have a responsibility to take the complaint deadly seriously

When the parents themselves don't seem to have taken it seriously? They did nothing until the school principal told them to go to the police, and that not till 4 days after the girl first spoke to the principal; when they went to the police they said they 'didn't want it to develop into a stalker situation', ie they didn't consider it a stalker situation at that time, despite the threatening emails and Ikenaga hanging around the house; they leave the house their daughter will return home to - alone - unlocked. That hardly sounds like they were talking the problem 'deadly seriously'. The police can only act on what they are given to go on, and it seems in this case they were not given very much.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I'll repost that since there is no edit link and the formatting is messed. Sigh, I guess I have to wait for someone else to post first, since this site doesn't allow two posts in a row.

I don't know, but they certainly have a responsibility to take the complaint deadly seriously

Which they did. First of all, they took the complaint, which a decade and a half ago likely wouldn't have happened. Secondly, they made not only one attempt, but three, at contacting the stalker to give him a verbal warning. Then they even called the girl when she got home to make sure she got home safely. So they actually went above and beyond what the law states they need to do. Why? Well, I'd hazard a guess that it was because they took the complaint seriously.

they could have done things like: Gone to her house and set up a watch, scoured the area (including the house) or staked it out to see if the guy would show up, even put her in a safe place for a while.

Yes, and if we could each have a police officer hanging outside the front of our houses all day every day, we'd never have any break-ins and the country would be a safer place. However here in the real world, police have limited resources, and the laws are set up to try to give the most protection, while requiring police to use up all their resources on each and every complaint. As mentioned earlier in the thread, a verbal warning gets rid of the huge majority of these people. Imagine if the police sent an officer or two to protect each house/person for those 90% of situations where a call was effective? They'd never have time to police anything else.

We always knew they did what they were "supposed to do". The problem is this is not enough. Sometimes you have to use common sense.

See my above comments. Sending out officers as personal body guards for every complaint is not common sense, on the contrary it's a waste of resources. While you would likely see less stalking incidents, you would see problems increase in other areas, because the police would be too busy bodyguarding to be able to be police.

On top of this, the police have a process they go through which is determined by law. If the police are following this process, then you have no right to criticize them, as your problem is with the law. Blaming the police in such a case is no better than blaming the messenger of bad news.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The ChronicOCT. 11, 2013 - 08:59AM JST The father should have taken a few weeks off work and stuck to his daughter like glue until this POS was brought to the police for questioning. Personally, after the first death threat came, the father should have put this punk down.....permanently.

That's the thing Chronic, most people are just way too passive. Lot's of people wouldn't take it seriously enough. Many wouldn't even go as far as to report to the police "hoping the problem will just go away".

I understand not everyone is strong and this is sad because these types of folks become defenseless.

I say any male member of the family be it the Father, Husband. Brother, Uncle, Cousin need to man up and protect their families.

Stalking is serious stuff. Nobody knows how far these nuts can go. It's like having a psychopath around. This case proves it and so many others.

In this situation you nobody can blame the police. 1) The police followed all proper procedures 2) Time between the first police complaint and the crime was just hours apart 3) The stalker already planned to commit the crime.

Like someone above said, if anyone would have seen him climb in and report it, the cops could have arrested the guy earlier before he had the chance to commit the crime.

But looking at this nut, he probably would have been released after a few months/years for breaking in and commit the crime in the future.

So if the police is the law, and the law sometimes can't protect you well enough. You gotta be proactive and deal with these problems personally.

Just like Chronic stated "the father should have put this punk down.....permanently"

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Charles Thomas Ikenaga, 21, who is from Kyoto..... He's Japanese or gaijin?

Take a wild guess. Half foreign name, half Japanese name... can you guess?

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Glad to hear that the pollice actually called her to check to see if she made it home safely. but i'm sure that still won't be enough for some commentatos. exhale the hate, peeps.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Strangerland

First of all, they took the complaint, which a decade and a half ago likely wouldn't have happened.

Not sure how that's relevant.

Secondly, they made not only one attempt, but three, at contacting the stalker to give him a verbal warning.

Yep, and they failed. Is that really 'job done' when someone is threatening murder?

Yes, and if we could each have a police officer hanging outside the front of our houses all day every day, we'd never have any break-ins and the country would be a safer place.

Right. But how many of us have a stalker threatening to murder us? It's not quite the same thing, is it.

Sending out officers as personal body guards for every complaint is not common sense, on the contrary it's a waste of resources.

Wow. Protecting someone from another person who has threatened to murder them (and did) is a 'waste of resources'?! What has a higher priority than that I wonder? Because if that ISN'T the Police's job, then what IS their job?

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

So what is going on in the social media and imagery for these young boys that would have them readily obsessed with a female? Maybe a time for change of values shown to these boys.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Japanese police are totally useless - anyone with even a slither of intelligence would have at that poor girl accompanied and protected properly. Her death is testament to the ineffective Japanese police.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

I'll try that again. This site has formatting issues:

Not sure how that's relevant. Previously they wouldn't taken it seriously. Nowadays, by comparison, they are.

Yep, and they failed. Is that really 'job done' when someone is threatening murder?

No, it's not job done, and the police obviously didn't think the job was done either, proven by the fact that they called the girl at home to make sure she got home safely. And given time, they likely would have done other things. But you seem to think she should have gotten a personal escort. For how long? A day? A week? A month? A year? And what if this guy was all talk, like 90% of them are, they would be personally escorting a girl based on something that likely wouldn't happen, rather than policing for the other 129,000,000 people in the country. Of course hindsight tells us that her situation wasn't the same as the 90% that go nowhere, but unless you have an expectation that police should be able to see the future, then expecting them to send out a personal bodyguard every time someone has a complaint that someone is bothering them is entirely unreasonable. And criticizing them after the fact for not doing so is just as unreasonable.

Right. But how many of us have a stalker threatening to murder us?

It's not quite the same thing, is it. Let's say 10 people in a given district have a stalker, and there are 15 police for that district. All of a sudden 2/3 of the police force is taken up as bodyguards, protecting people of whom 90% don't need it, as a phone call would clear it all up.

Protecting someone from another person who has threatened to murder them (and did) is a 'waste of resources'?!

They were trying to protect her. They called the guy three times, they followed up with her, and had he not killed her and kept threatening, they would have escalated. Sending out personal bodyguards every time there is a complaint like this IS a waste of resources, when there are more effective methods of policing that doesn't remove the police from the rest of the laws they are meant to uphold.

The people who have criticized the police here are in the wrong, plain and simple. The police did what they are told to do by the legislatures, who make the laws. If you think that the police should be acting as personal bodyguards, then you need to petition the government, and expect your taxes to go up significantly as the police hire a new bodyguard force.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Can you imagine how many proper crimes the cops wouldn't be out there solving if they were running out to save every girl who claimed some guy was stalking her? Can you imagine the power women would have if the cops were jumping through hoops for them? This case was unfortunate, but you can't blame the cops.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

You know, enough with this testosterone-fueled revenge fantasy nonsense about how if this was your daughter you would have rolled up on him with crew of dudes and took him out or whatever.

The father should have taken a few weeks off work and stuck to his daughter like glue until this POS was brought to the police for questioning. Personally, after the first death threat came, the father should have put this punk down.....permanently. Too bad a girly looking guy like him couldn't be sent to an American Max security prison. Then he'll wish he was dead.

Yeah. Dad should have totally hired a bunch of body guards, quit his job, sold the house and moved to Australia, right? Bonus points for the implied prison rape. Actually, I bet Dad is wishing that he had done one or all of the above right now, but that doesn't change the fact that 1) up-rooting the entire family is neither an easy thing to do, 2) nor something anyone should have to do because of some nutjob. If the parents had been more proactive, might things have turned out differently? Maybe.... maybe not. But a lot of people here are uncomfortably close to victim blaming.

beta + finally got a girl friend + broken up -> become stalker, familiar pattern. in other news, some guy just flied 7000 miles to stab his ex with a fork. This wouldn't happen if these desperate guys had learn some game instead of cling to the past.

Yeah, because we all know that "alphas" never end up brutally murdering their girlfriends/wives/exes/domestic-partners.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Everyone is an expert on hindsight situations. It sounds like the police did everything by the book and within their powers. This guy is obviously a nutter and I doubt there is anything else the police could have done to prevent this.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

So, she was advised by her principal to seek police help in June, but only went to the cops on the day of her death some three months later? Can't really blame the cops in this case. She could have gone to the cops earlier, but it is difficult to say if the outcome would have been different even if she had gone to the cops earlier. The only person to blame is the scumbag that killed her. This is a clear pre-meditated murder case and he should hang!

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Strangerland

No, it's not job done,

Nope, it sure isn't.

But you seem to think she should have gotten a personal escort. For how long? A day? A week? A month? A year?

Yeah, I do. Or something similar. Until they knew she really was safe, or had the guy in custody.

And what if this guy was all talk, like 90% of them are, they would be personally escorting a girl based on something that likely wouldn't happen, rather than policing for the other 129,000,000 people in the country.

But he wasn't. And he HAD threatened to kill her. I don't know about you, but where I am from, that's a serious crime in itself. If you really think making a few phone calls constitutes an appropriate response I would simply point to the fact that the girl died as a result of your line of reasoning, and I reject it.

Of course hindsight tells us that her situation wasn't the same as the 90% that go nowhere, but unless you have an expectation that police should be able to see the future, then expecting them to send out a personal bodyguard every time someone has a complaint that someone is bothering them is entirely unreasonable.

Hyperbole doesn't help your position much. I know stalking happens relatively frequently in Japan, I understand perfectly that the Police would get their share of complaints about it. I also understand that not all of them are the same, and I am guessing that a relatively small percentage would involve threats to kill. Police need to use their discretion on this, but they also need to take it seriously. No, I'm obviously not advocating bodyguards for everyone, and I'll thank you not to try to construct my argument to support your own. It's very unbecoming.

Let's say 10 people in a given district have a stalker, and there are 15 police for that district. All of a sudden 2/3 of the police force is taken up as bodyguards, protecting people of whom 90% don't need it, as a phone call would clear it all up.

Again, fabricating a scenario doesn't help much here.

The people who have criticized the police here are in the wrong, plain and simple.

That's the beauty of a discussion and debate. We all see things differently.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Hey guys, Police is GUILTY because she reported Death Threats, plus Loitering outside the house. Police under such circumstances SHOULD send men to check and control the premises and make sure of the safety of her and her neigbourhood. A Death Threat is a crime as big as murder itself, and should never be ignored. They called his cellphone?! Seriously? Who are you, lazy, dumb useless policemen? What do you do other than paperwork, and phone calls?

-10 ( +0 / -9 )

Why being rejected by a girl was so upsetting? That's how females are. He should have watched a Rakugo.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Here's a thought, if a person suspected of stocking somebody else, why don't the police check with local cell phone carriers and see if the suspected stocker's phone has GPS capabilities. If so why don't the police activate and track the GPS location.

If the police were to have done this it is highly probable that they would have noticed that the suspect in this case was near the victims house and could've done a better job and possibly saving her life...

I cannot see how activating a GPS device on a person's phone to determine their location infringes on their civil liberties. The police are not asking telephone companies to divulge personal information about who they talk to.

I personally think that this could be a life-saving measure!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

She was advised by the principal on Oct 4.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You think a restraining order will stop the same crazy person?

No, but it will give the better reason to put him away if he breaks the order, which is the whole point of a restraining order. Verbally warning him does NOTHING. Written notices? Laughable! He keeps his distance or he gets arrested and put away for stalking

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I doubt a police escort would have been useful in this case as the ex hid until he was sure she was alone. What would have happened was the police would have seen her safely home, bid her goodbye and then the boyfriend would have attacked after the police were gone. The fault lies with the ex-boyfriend.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Terrible circumstances and few "ifs" for police and girl's parents.

How about boy's parents? I think his mother probably knew what he was feeling and could she have been able to calm him down? In the case this is the key in my opinion.

Police have been proactive but not enough I guess. The fact the murderer traveled from Kyoto and made death threats was the red light. No matter the police force is not able to respond to every stalker case phone calls might have just made the killer finish quicker his deadly plans.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

If she has proof that she was stalked and threatened, shouldnt it be enough for the police to arrest him immediately? the oral warning and letter seems to be romantic (sarcasm) and out of place when dealing with obsessed lunatics. I say capture them, give them counseling while in prison hopefully they will move on and come out as a new person. If the psychiatrist consider him dangerous then he shouldnt be allowed to be free because someone will definitely become a victim!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Police also asked Suzuki to bring copies of emails that Ikenaga had sent her

Does that mean that when she went to the police on the Tuesday morning, she didn't/couldn't show them the emails she had received? If so, the police had no 'proof' at all and their hands were tied.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Even if they had the emails it would be evidence not proof. A statement from someone saying that they have received death threats is also evidence. Then its up to the police to how to respond.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Jesus, you can just imagine the terror the poor girl must have felt in those final moments, believing she was completely safe within her own home, only to be accosted inside her own house and chased outside to be killed..

The mental case murderer is lucky he didn't get lynched.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Triumvere: Do Not put words in my mouth!

I said take a few weeks off work to watch out for his daughter until the situation is handled properly by the police only! Learn to read man and if the police don't take care of it, the father has the right to!

And prison rape...yes..the POS deserves that for the rest of his life and more.

I am not blaming the victim nor the police. The parents, especially the father, from what I have read did NOTHING to ensure the safety of his daughter especially after it was known that the POS made death threats. Leaving the house wide open, not taking the girl to school and picking her up by car until this POS was in police custody being questioned. That doesn't fly with me, man.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Surely when someone reports a crime of this nature (stalking) the police would take a statement then send an officer to investigate? Or at the very least have a look? Not phone his mobile!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The guy was living in Kyoto. He went to Tokyo to kill her. R.O. would accomplish what exactly other than to tack on the violation of R.O. on top of the murder charges?

@Nigelboy--What part of filing the complaint much, much sooner did you not understand? If that had been done, there would have been opportunities to arrest him for violating the restraining order with a chance of a permanent lock-up...resulting in the girl still being alive.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Out of interest, where is the killer from? He's half-Japanese?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Out of interest, where is the killer from? He's half-Japanese?

...

Charles Thomas Ikenaga, 21, who is from Kyoto

You couldn't read past the first small paragraph?

Anyway the area he is from in Kyoto is pretty dumpy.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

This is why I don't do internet dating.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

maybe police roles should be increased in this area, it is very sad that the life of an 18 year old (pretty young lady) - someone who has future graduations and dreams for herself and her family, was taken just in minutes when she was in a very defenceless position against this brutal attack - from some kind of coward, uneducated, abunai stalker. RIP young lady.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Stalkers really are modern day ninja. They hide in the dark and then kill you when you least expect it.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Just hearing the word stalker creeps me out.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is precisely what owning a firearm is for, too bad this is not allowed for the " Average Suzuki "...RIP little girl.

-3 ( +1 / -3 )

It's a collective failure.

they said the vast majority quit after a call from the police.

Yes, the majority are heavy rude people that simply follow you too long on the way, that insist too much, and no, they can't to put you on a VIP protection list each time a weirdo follows you from the station, or one that always eats in the same shops as you. BUT, the majority are not the victim's ex, they have not been stalking for months on and they are not making death threats. There are cases like this one with really many red flags . Anyway death threat is a crime, related or not to stalking, and you can get jail for it in Japan. They arrest people for typing "I'm going to kill someone in Akiba" on twitter, so with the same law, they could arrest him. Yes, I know they were going to, the next day.... but the mistake was not assuring immediately the safety of the victim. I'm repeating but she should have not been let alone before they caught him and at least confronted him about the threats. Even if that meant she had to miss school and go live in another town for a while. If you learned you had a contract on your head from the mafia or a fatwa like Salman Rushdie, you wouldn't keep your routine. People, I mean the police first (since they are ones that can organize it, inform others), the families and any victim should consider it that way.

Does that mean that when she went to the police on the Tuesday morning, she didn't/couldn't show them the emails she had received? If so, the police had no 'proof' at all and their hands were tied.

Their hands tied so they can't use the internet nor drive their car to the girl's house to check ? How likely is it that she lived far away ? I understand they didn't have to, according to their textbook, but they could have done more. It's about a death threat, not a stolen charinko.

The parents, especially the father, from what I have read did NOTHING

I agree the family seems at best delusional people that didn't get what stalking was about, and maybe worse. Maybe the father was thinking the daughter caused the problems. That happened to an acquaintance, maybe she was in her early 20's, still living at parents, she had a job. She had problems with a guy that assaulted her, not a rape as law defines it, but nearly, he was arrested. And the father told her to move out as she was an indecent woman. The mother and siblings were shocked but they said they couldn't take her side. Whatever, many youths have families less than ideal, and the police has to help the young victims even without their cooperation. Kids and teens should be informed they don't need their parents to go to the police or file a lawsuit, there are family judges that are a phone call away if needed.

From? He's half-Japanese?

From Japan, born and raised in Kyoto. Is it a city reputed for its stalking culture ?. He is fully Japanese. He has a Filipino parent. Happy ? She is less dead ?That changes what ?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@Nigelboy--What part of filing the complaint much, much sooner did you not understand? If that had been done, there would have been opportunities to arrest him for violating the restraining order with a chance of a permanent lock-up...resulting in the girl still being alive.

ControlFreak

On which planet does violating a restraining order result in "permanent lock-up"? Like most country, a first time violator is simply a warning and a monetary fine Secondly, if the victim nor the police knew the whereabouts of the stalker (he was living in Kyoto but took the bus to Tokyo on September 27th) how is the police going to serve him the R.O. let alone arrest him?

The problem with posts like yours and many others is that you base your argument on hindsight which is that you already know this stalker is going to kill the victim. Based on this hindsight, of course the victim, the parents, and the police could of done much more. I'm willing to bet that the parents of the victims are thinking the same thing but the reality is that none of them knew what the this stalker was caple of doing. Read the reports on how his neighbors and co-worker described him.

隣室の女性(43)によると、母親のほかに幼稚園ぐらいの妹と暮らしており、昨年冬ごろまではマンション通路で妹と仲良く遊ぶ姿を見かけた。女性は「おとなしくて優しそうな人だった。信じられない」と話した。

According to the next door neighbor, the accused was living with his mother and his younger sister of kindergarten age. Up until last winter, the said neighbor saw him playing with his sister near the apartment. She stated "He seems calm and kind person. I still can't believe it".

"あいさつや敬語がしっかりしていて真面目に働いていた"

His co-worker stated that "His aisatsu and keigo were well firm and worked very diligengly"

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Two Words for Mr. Ikenaga: Death Penalty. This was premeditated, planned, and carried out, and Saaya Suzuki is dead. Death Penalty.

Stalking laws DO need to be strengthened. This is a tragedy that was preventable.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Secondly, if the victim nor the police knew the whereabouts of the stalker (he was living in Kyoto but took the bus to Tokyo on September 27th) how is the police going to serve him the R.O. let alone arrest him?

Change that to " didn't know the whereabouts".

1 ( +4 / -3 )

This is precisely what owning a firearm is for, too bad this is not allowed for the " Average Suzuki "

Ah yes, because she would have had her firearm in her hand, loaded and ready to fire, the moment he stepped out of the closet - and shot her point-blank with his firearm.

Incredible.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Cleo

Amazing how everything relates back to guns, ain't it?

It was your Churchill who observed "A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject," was it not....

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

The police didn't have any evidence of the death threats, which is why they asked the girl to bring the emails. They can't be expected to act upon every incident when there is nothing to support a claim.

I wish the outcome was different, but sometimes any action taken is not enough...especially in hindsight.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The police didn't have any evidence of the death threats, which is why they asked the girl to bring the emails. They can't be expected to act upon every incident when there is nothing to support a claim.

The threat message was relayed to the victim via "LINE" to victim's friend's cellphone since the victim had already blocked his cell phone number.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

therougou - Yes, I am aware he lives in Kyoto. What I meant was what is his nationality as most Japanese males don't have names like Charles Thomas.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Nigelboy: Okay, but the police still didn't have proof of the death threat.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I'm not sure there is really anything more police can do in a situation such as this. Other than, of course, educate the populace on stalking, and how to potential victims can protect themselves.

I'd have to disagree with you a little bit. I do agree that people should be educated on this issue, but the police could have been more aggressive about it. Assigning an officer to watch Suzuki's residence, and a warrant to bring Ikenaga in for questioning.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Assign an officer? Based on one report? I don't think so.

And a warrant? On what evidence?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

In other words, the police in Japan can only be as good as the laws they're supposed to enforce. Better laws = better law enforcement. I sincerely hope this guys life will be a living hell from here on out.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

*I believe a restraining order is the same as a verbal or written warning.... Even if she had a restraining order on the guy a piece of paper was not going to stop him from stabbing her. What's a person suppose to say in a situation like that? "Give me a minute to show you my restraining order." I believe in cases like this the best solution is to have the person arrested an evaluated, have a 48 to 72 hours hold to verify if the person is stable. Some stalkers move on after a police scare but others are so out there that to them it doesn't matter if the police gives them a warning or not. My heart goes out to the family of the victim, unfortunately she is already gone and there's nothing they can do for her but laws can be fixed and help future victims.*****

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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