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Tomita denies stealing camera at Asian Games

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Wow! His excuse for not doing it is worse than his excuse for doing it. Which one is the lie?

9 ( +13 / -6 )

After Koreans rigged a boxing match I wouldn't be suprised if they framed him as well.

-6 ( +17 / -21 )

Tomita sounds and acts like typical Japanese who are involved in scandals or commit wrongdoings, this is to deny, deny and deny.

The same method are used by from politicians to scientists. Anyone here still remember when Obokata’s "stem cell breakthrough" was first exposed, she did exact something as Tomita is doing right now – got an attorney and claimed she was a victim.

Classic !

8 ( +18 / -13 )

What a pathetic, dishonorable excuse. A kilogram of camera felt like a few pins? What are these swimming pins made of, lead?

Seriously, this is just the case of a whiny, overpampered fool who finally got caught in a situation that his fame/swimming talent could not get him out of, trying to displace the blame. I would bet that if you look into his past, his trying to diffuse blame for anything he's done wrong has been a constant in his life.

6 ( +11 / -8 )

I can't believe he did it, what possible motive would he have? And never mind CCTV, it was an international sporting event; there were TV cameras and fans' mobile phones all over the place.

Didn't happen.

3 ( +10 / -5 )

Tomita, you should be pleased cuz the “black object” placed in your bag was not a bomb. Don’t cry anymore!

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Considering everything else that happened at the games, and bearing in mind that Korean cops have an even lower reputation for extracting confessions than Japan... Could go either way.

Release the tapes. That should clear things up.

16 ( +18 / -2 )

EthanWilber, there you go! We've seen this so often!

Remember the politician who broke out in tears. And Obokata, and, and, and .......

They are like little kids, if they don't get what they want .... CRY!

So, Tomita-kun, get over it, finish your ban and maybe start all over again (swimming, of course).

1 ( +7 / -8 )

Let him have his day in court.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The JOC just issued their own counter statement. They said they confirmed the video, and it was they who identified the man in the video as Tomita. Is Tomita getting defended by the Japanese right wing who want to ride the anti-Korean feelings in Japan? Tomita's lawyer know fully well that the Korean police have no reason to release this video to the public because the case is already closed as they're concerned. And Tomita didn't expect that he would be kicked out of the swimming team, want to salvage his future by defending himself. But what doesn't add up is that he says he has an alibi and that he didn't do it. Then why didn't he speak up when he was arrested, and why didn't he mention his alibi at that time? Any sane really innocent person with strong alibi would say "I didn't do it, you can talk to this person who can prove that I wasn't there".

Now that this broke news, I'm not really surprised to see more and more Japanese starting to defend him. Pretty soon, this lie too will become the truth in time. This fits Japan's pattern. It must be in the culture of denials.

12 ( +23 / -14 )

Let him have his day in court.

In a Japanese court with Korean evidence?

1 ( +3 / -3 )

Show us the video. No evidence, no credibility.

2 ( +9 / -6 )

Either he didn't do it, or after seeing the footage he feels he can get away with it or he's getting bad legal advice. But yeah, someone's lying.... Personally, the kid looks like he's lying, but...

Show the video evidence.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

The JOC just issued their own counter statement. They said they confirmed the video, and it was they who identified the man in the video as Tomita.

@Papi2013

Thank you for posting that. I am very relieved to see the JOC take the high, good-sportsmanship road on this. It makes me feel hope for Japan after the passionate episodes of Obokata, Nonomura and now Tomita.

It would certainly seem that there are right-wing elements at play here who believe that denial and playing the victim card is the best strategy for saving face and preserving the yamato-damashii pride.

13 ( +13 / -3 )

"Show us the video. No evidence, no credibility."

Once the case is closed, Korean police do not release the evidence. Tomito's lawyer knows this well because that's what he himself said in the interview with Tokyo Sports shimbun. To release the video, Tomito's side can apply for a reinvestigation with the Korean Incheon Police - which will force the video to be released.

But ha ha... yeah, I'm sure when pigs fly, will Tomito reapply for reinvestigation, I'm sure. This is a all publicity stunt so that Tomito can defend his reputation in Japan, and possibly salvage his swimming future.

1 ( +6 / -6 )

@Mizuame

I don't mean literally. It's an idiom.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I can't see a Japanese swimmer stealing a camera while in a competition representing his country. I think this was planted on him with the intention of shaming Japan's swim team and Japan. He has sponsorships. He isn't someone who can't afford a camera. If there was a poll button here at this forum, I'd bet most would believed he was framed.

-7 ( +8 / -13 )

Apologizing and denying is becoming a national pastime.

5 ( +9 / -5 )

No evidence, no culprit. So he cannot even show what s telling he shall be the liar ?

A third-party not proven impartial , even Japanese, saying you did it, as nothing to do with justice.

As a Civilized, I can only see this as a plot so far. Where was the trial ? Just to force under pressure again, like Japanese love to do.

PS: I am not saying he is not guilty either. But Public does not know yet.

-8 ( +1 / -8 )

Tomita is a loser and a thief. Tomita is trying to deflect the damages that he has caused because he is in danger of losing financial support and sponsorship, and some havelready announced it is suspending his contract. He might have to work for McDonalds flipping a burger.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

A Japanese Police lie detector test will help absolve the young athlete. Once cleared; The Japanese Chief of Police can make a professional courtesy call upon the Korean Chief of Police. Men of honor can trust each.

-12 ( +1 / -12 )

"Tomita sounds and acts like typical Japanese who are involved in scandals or commit wrongdoings, this is to deny, deny and deny."

yeah. but why do they all break down and confess. It makes no sense!!! so many criminals in Japan would so easily go free if they simply did not confess their crimes. But only two things happen in Japan when it comes to ANY crime. Confess. or Deny, deny deny, confess. I makes ZERO sense. but good for us! Cause they all get caught in the end. Murder conviction in the USA stands at 20%!!! Murder conviction in Japan stands at 90%+!!!

-3 ( +3 / -5 )

@Papi2013 His alibi only works if it occurred at 10:48 which Tomita's side claims (probably the lawyer didn't do enough research that the initial report was not correct) but since it actually occurred at 11:48, his alibi is actually meaningless. What I want to know is why he put the camera in his suitcase once he got back to the room, the camera he thought was a trash and wanted to throw it away immediately but couldn't since there was no trash bin around... real strange fellow.

4 ( +6 / -3 )

Japanfriend1959Nov. 07, 2014 - 08:49AM JST A Japanese Police lie detector test will help absolve the young athlete.

If he was right, why didn't he fight the accusation in SK? The problem is that polygraphs can be fooled and not admissable in most courts. In the trial, Tomita already admitted to the camera theft and accepted the fine. Case is over. He's got conviction record. It's more about the shame and financial loss that he has caused himself and the family. Nobody respect him anymore.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

If the Korean police are anything like Japanese police, then Tomita could have been forced to admit he stole it, even if he didn't do it.

But...Hasn't he been back for a bit now? Why did he wait until now to say he didn't do it? His story sounds fishy. If the Japanese officials identified the man as Tomita, then the video must've been clear enough.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I believe the guy

-8 ( +6 / -13 )

What a sad, pathetic loser. He can't even own up to his crime -- that's worse than the "I was drunk. I don't remember" usual excuse. There's footage of him stealing the camera, which he and ONLY he says is "blurry, and doesn't clearly show me doing it". Then he says he admitted something black was in his back but thought "it was rubbish", and didn't even check before slinking off. He didn't admit to it because he was scared and wanted to be let go, he admitted to it because he was guilty and he knew it. Now he waits, what... a month? in the safety of his nation and realizing the consequences of his actions to LIE? Forget about the 18 month ban and ban him for life! If he's so certain about the footage and wants everyone to see it and believe him, have his lawyer's file an appeal with the Korean police and release the footage for all to see. But he won't do that because he and his lawyer know we'll see it and they can't play the victim game anymore.

Pathetic.

5 ( +12 / -8 )

“I didn’t steal the camera,” Tomita told a news conference in Nagoya, claiming an unidentified person had grabbed his arm and placed a “black object” in his bag.

LOL. Would have been better going with the standard "I was drunk" excuse.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

The Bushido way must have changed, what an honorable way!

3 ( +5 / -2 )

A shabby pack of of laughably implausible lies woven purely for domestic consumption. He's a 25 year old playing the poor little kid caught stealing cookies. His mum should tell him to stop fibbing and go to his room without supper. Comical really

4 ( +7 / -4 )

JWithersNov. 07, 2014 - 08:29AM JST Japanese police have a 98% conviction rate. Most of that through coerced confession. No access to a lawyer and no English allowed when communicating with your lawyer when he finally does arrive.

I know this is off topic, but this is a frequently repeated mistake.

The criminal procedure act of Japan, section IV: Article 30 - "(1) The accused or the suspect may appoint counsel at any time." Article 39 - "(1) The accused or the suspect in custody may, without any official being present, have an interview with, or send to or receive documents or articles from counsel or prospective counsel upon the request of a person entitled to appoint counsel with (regard to a person who is not a lawyer, this shall apply only after the permission prescribed in paragraph 2 of Article 31 has been obtained .)

The only limits they can place on your consulting with legal counsel are to prevent your escape, and to set the date and time for the meeting. The prosecutor has to show how it is necessary for the investigation if they want to set the time and date, and it cannot interfere with your ability to prepare a defense.

These are the actual laws.

Now I'm not saying that the J-cops will volunteer this information to you in English, and judging by some cases I've read about they may push their luck and see how much they can interfere without getting called on it. They get away with this because most citizens are not aware of the laws. However if you request counsel and then get your counsel to provide you with bilingual English-Japanese copies of all the relevant laws relating to your case then you might find that the J-cops will be a LOT less pushy if they are faced with the prospect of someone standing up in court and rattling off a long list of the times the cops breached the criminal procedure act and asking for a mistrial on the basis of interference resulting in insufficient time to prepare a defense.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I don't think he admitted to something he didn't do out of fear for not being able to return home. I don't think there was any "unclear" footage at all...

I think he took the camera (for whatever reason), got caught and was scared sh*tless when taken in by the police. When they showed him footage of the accident, he had no option but to admit.

Now, back in Japan, this chickensh*t is trying to deny that he was guilty, beacause once back here, he hipes to cash in on the rivalry between the two countries, Japanese nationalism and the fact that nobody here can (or will) check the actual fact.

Ban this clown for life, I say.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

smithinjapan, if Tomito files a reinvestigation and ask to release the video tape, the Korean police will have no choice but to do so. But we all know Tomito and his lawyer will never do that because he would then have to go to trial in Korea - which he never had to do because he admitted guilt and paid the $1000 fine to the Korean police who basically let him off easy (a big mistake in my opinion which I said at that time), and the victimized owner of the camera did not wish to press charges against him, even asking the Japanese swimming organization not to ban him from swimming team. If he goes to trial and is found guilty, he will face jail time. Now if he's really interested in clearing his name, then this is what he should do. Unless he does this, there's nothing can be done from Japan nor the Japanese police can do anything. He has to follow the rules and procedures to get the video released to the public to clear his name. But he knows he can make brave noise and plead innocence and shout Korean conspiracy, all from the safe distance inside Japan - and know absolutely nothing bad can happen to him. He will try to fool and get as many anti-Korean Japanese people on his side to build a case for himself in an attempt to get some of his life back, knowing the truth can't be revealed unless he goes to Korea and appeal to reopen the case.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

He isn't someone who can't afford a camera.

For all we know, this guy could be a cleptomaniac.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Nobody here knows what really happened, but as most people are saying, his actions seem very strange. Why wait weeks on end to make this statement? To have enough time to think up of a plausible excuse? If you're innocent and you know you'll get into big trouble, then you protest your innocence immediately, and make a song and dance about it.

I'd love to see the video too. If it turns out that he really did steal it, his career will definitely be over. At least if he'd kept his mouth shut, he could have just wait a few months before resuming his career. Face-saving stunt? And with the current Kenkan anti-Korean sentiment, he's bound to get plenty of supporters and well-wishers.

Maybe true, the japanese police also use the same illegal tactics on foreigners often forcing a confession or keeping them locked up in a prison cell for a month.

Tomita learning from how foreigners are treated in Japan?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Tomita sounds and acts like typical Japanese who are involved in scandals or commit wrongdoings, this is to deny, deny and deny.

Um, Japan is one of the few countries I could think of that a person commits a crime then goes straight to the police admitting their wrongdoing. While this is happening, a person in your country is going through a long court process because they claim innocence with all evidence proving their guilt.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The tapes were viewed by Japanese Olympic officials after which they immediately released their own comments on the theft. The Japanese officials suspended him never said he didn't do it. Move on with your life.

6 ( +7 / -3 )

It's only anecdotal, of course, but his body language and denials sure look and sound like the university guys we catch cheating on exams.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I believe the guy

@gogogo

At a press conference yesterday, Japan Olympic Committee member Naoya Yanagiya said that upon being shown the CCTV video, members of the delegation of Japanese athletes immediately identified the person in the footage as Tomita. (Japanese quote from Sankei Sports "日本選手団関係者たちに動画を見せたところ、日本オリンピック委員会役員である柳谷直哉氏が、動画の中の人物が冨田であるとすぐに特定した」")

So @gogogo, do you think that Tomita is telling the truth, but JOC member Yanagiya is not?

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Knox HarringtonNOV. 07, 2014 - 09:29AM JST

For all we know, this guy could be a cleptomaniac.

That is my theory. He is mentally ill, can't stop stealing, but since he's ill, doesn't realize what he did was wrong, he really believes he's innocent and feel that the world is against him. Few smoking signs include internet rumors that he's been caught lying and stealing many times before, that he's a habitual liar. Then there are the comments made by the Japanese Olympic Committee immediately after the theft. They said that Tomita had some bad mental issues. What did they mean when they said he had mental problems? Where there is smoke, there is fire. What's interesting to see are the Japanese nationalists starting to rally around and defend him, accusing Korean conspiracy, and stoking the fan.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

typical japanese way of handling things.

admit - apologize - deny - apologize again - deny again - deny - deny - deny indefinitely...

and this is perfect time of reviving his swimming career back on track. blame koreans and people will follow.

1 ( +5 / -5 )

At this point, even if he didn't do it, he is guilty of cowardice in the face of pressure. Equally shameful an act.

4 ( +4 / -2 )

The video should be "leaked" for everyone to see. End this ridiculousness once and for all.

2 ( +4 / -1 )

Video can't be shown till any possible trial is over.

Not defending him but the public verdict usually is worse than the judicial one. 100% agree with my friends news should not become entertainment as practiced often NY the media.

Where people feel they are entitled to know it NOW.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I am not convinced he would do something like stealing a camera. He must have been framed by people out to discredit the Japanese team and I'm not Japanese. It does not take a genius to guess which country or countries these people are from.

-9 ( +1 / -9 )

I can't see a Japanese swimmer stealing a camera while in a competition representing his country. I think this was planted on him with the intention of shaming Japan's swim team and Japan. He has sponsorship. He isn't someone who can't afford a camera !!!

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

but the Damage cause by his act/nonact is already done.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What's interesting to see are the Japanese nationalists starting to rally around and defend him, accusing Korean conspiracy, and stoking the fan.

Papi,

Agreed. I get the feeling that Tomita is urged by someone to go out and deny this publicly, playing on just this anti-Korean sentiment that lurks heavy in the oyaji layers around here. In any case, he'll soon be portrayed as the poor Japanese victim in this case. Lid on, as per usual procedure.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

He has good reason to be skeptical of the police. They often do things in a very dodgy way.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If that is the case then he should be challenging the S. Korean authorities to hand over the video for all to see.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I am not convinced he would do something like stealing a camera. He must have been framed by people out to discredit the Japanese team

Then who are the Japanese Olympic Committee members who issued statements that they saw the video of him stealing it?

< http://gogotsu.com/archives/561 >

Are they trying to discredit their own Japanese team? OK, never mind, obviously they must be Korean spies planted in the JOC. (this is getting truly ludicrous, the level of defending this guy under overwhelming evidence just because he's Japanese). Of course, Japanese cannot possibly have any thieves. Crimes don't exist in Japan. Only foreigners commit crimes in Japan! Japanese never do those things!

2 ( +5 / -4 )

The JOC took the right decision - after viewing the footage of this criminal stealing the camera - in banning Tomita for 18 months. If he wants to appeal the criminal case or swimming ban, thats his prerogative (I bet he doesnt have the hide, however ).

He really is an embarrassment to all the great and honourable Japanese athletes in this nation.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@Knox

Agreed. I get the feeling that Tomita is urged by someone to go out and deny this publicly, playing on just this anti-Korean sentiment that lurks heavy in the oyaji layers around here.

I'd agree regarding the anti-Korean sentiment, but to be fair to Tomita, immediately after "admitting" what had happened aloud to reporters in Seoul, he muttered "I didn't do it" under his breath.

That makes it seem that he was under some kind of pressure to confess and get the heck out of there.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I'd agree regarding the anti-Korean sentiment, but to be fair to Tomita, immediately after "admitting" what had happened aloud to reporters in Seoul, he muttered "I didn't do it" under his breath.

luca,

First time I hear of this. Some source, perhaps? If he admits to stealing, only to mutter his innocence moments later he seems to have some mental issues. Which is it? Did he do it or not? I he incapable of understanding that, in the eyes of the law, admitting guilt means he's guilty? Maybe he should use his hiatus to brush up on common knowledge - seems he need some.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Tomita seems already toooooo late to say such a thing after he accepted guilt at the police if even someone put the camera in his bag.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Of course, Japanese cannot possibly have any thieves. Crimes don't exist in Japan. Only foreigners commit crimes in Japan! Japanese never do those things!

Calm down, paps. Nobody is saying that. Personally I'm not going to judge the guy until I see the evidence, but everyone I have spoken to in Japan is "akireteru" with this guy.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

This issue is personal and should not drag the two countries into whatever misunderstanding. Let the court decides based on evidences. If the athlete is lying he should go to jail, but if Korean police cannot prove that this man stole the camera, then truth must be revealed here.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

What a weasel! Before, I thought he was just stupid, but now I am disgusted. Instead of standing up and say, I did somethings stupid, he comes with this fairy tale. Yuck.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

If he admits to stealing, only to mutter his innocence moments later he seems to have some mental issues.

He first claimed his innocence at the press conference at Kimpo airport, right before he left for Japan. That made everyone scratch their heads. But that doesn't prove anything, because by that time, the Korean police already let him go without trial, the fine was already paid, the JOC had already practically disowned him, including JOC ordering other Japanese to stay away from Tomito (can they really do this?), and there were already much commotion going on in Japan. I can see exactly what he was thinking. This was getting out of hand, and he knew his career was in jeopardy, so he had to stand up and say he didn't do it. But how convenient.... he does this when the books are already closed on him and the case was deemed closed. Why didn't he then stay and launch an appeal?

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

@Knox

Sorry, no source to hand. I read it first in the Shukan Shinchou, but I'm fairly sure it was on YahooJapan, too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Mark: the JOC immediately banned him AFTER seeing the evidence and saying it was Tomita. So, are they lying, or is he? The Korean authorities obviously proved it, only Tomita is the one now, a month later, denying it. He is a coward on top of a liar. I repeat: ban him for life.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

I find the whole story fishy, he 1st admitted to it and paid the fine.

Granted the suspension hurts his professional career, but par for the course.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So I think Korean Polices should release Video which they used accused him.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@EthanWilber

"Tomita sounds and acts like typical Japanese who are involved in scandals or commit wrongdoings, this is to deny, deny and deny." I agree 1000%

Always the punk azz excuse, I don't remember, I was drunk, I wanted to see what it was like: adjuration, nix, and refutal, the classic methodology, when caught, in hopes that THEIR system will understand and sympathize-and cut some leeway, and it selectively does. No wonder the world thinks their a joke. In the US they would be put in check with the quickness...

3 ( +4 / -1 )

A middle aged Asian man in his forty's bumps tomita from behind, grabs his arm, opens his bag wide open, and then drops a big black something into his bag. Any normal situation would make anyone peek inside to see what was dropped into the bag, right? Anyone except Tomita that is. When he found the camera in his bag, why didn't he turn it over to someone in authority? Instead he takes it to his apartment and claims that he was going to leave it there. I mean come on.. this guy's story has more holes in it, anyone who believes in his story must really desperately want him to be innocent enough to give this much benefit of doubt. I mean, his story is so laughably funny, how can anyone take him seriously?

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Humans are thinking species and we come with excellent excuses. Let give this guy what he asked for, justice in his own country. It's either going to make him or break him.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I 'd like to propose JOC should let atheletes travel overseas alone for a few months before they participate in their first internanational game,in order to cultivate their spirit of independence.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The first poster in this thread nailed it: Tomita's excuse for not doing it is worse than his earlier confession for why he did. As I noted above, his post-confession denials remind me of the kind of thing students say when caught cheating on exams and then later denying that they initially admitted guilt. Even his body language is similar. It's like they think if they remain firm in their denials and keep giving short, clipped answers, then no matter how strong the evidence against them we'll have to believe their stories.

4 ( +4 / -1 )

I find the whole story fishy, he 1st admitted to it and paid the fine.

It seems that it was JOC who paid the fine without his consent, and later they sent him the bill. JOC is acting strange too. The whole thing seems unprofessional.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

It seems that it was JOC who paid the fine...

Source for that?

So I had to head over to YouTube and watch this "press conference"... Seems like an orchestrated event, put together by vested interests, perhaps the lawyer. I think this will work just fine over here. People can always squeeze out a "they don't understand us", and if repeated endlessly (which it will be) the non-critical, non-foreign speaking masses will believe what they are told. This me it's clear that this guy did what he is accused of - there is absolutely no reason for "framing" this guy to get back at Japan, as some posters seem to suggest. Had Tomita been a stand-up guy, he would have admitted to what he did and dealt with the reaction. After that, he could have tried to make his comeback. Now he just comes across as an immature, stealing little punk.

-2 ( +2 / -5 )

I have the feeling he would have used the "I was drunk, and didn't know what I was doing" excuse if he were not at a sporting event where drug testing was likely done.

2 ( +3 / -2 )

An exchange of one kilogram camera-like 'pins' with an unidentified shadowy figure, eh? Sounds completely believable. Not. This guy is a liar extraordinaire. All he needs to do now is blabber incoherently about how it wasn't his fault and how he was just trying to help Japan be successful. He'll be in some prime minister's cabinet in the near future.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The story itself is somewhat believable considering people went as far as changing the air flow in the arenas to make certain teams lose at badminton. Also some Japanese do some incredibly stupid things overseas (one of my wife's friends paid $2000 for a compact digital camera after losing hers..).

However I don't believe him in this case and think he is just desperate to get out of his ban.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

he could have release his statement of not being guilty just days or weeks after returning from s/korea. this amount of time probably gave him the chance to think of ways to deny this act.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

It seems that it was JOC who paid the fine...

Source for that?

The lawyer showed a blowup copy of the bill from JOC at the conference.

camera-like 'pins'

He didn't say he thought it was pins, he said it's common to recieve things like pins and uniforms, etc at international events.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Hahahaha! Tomita let me think on this a bit.................................eh...........na don't believe ya sorry!

Him & his lawyer look pretty stupid trotting out this lame "garbage or pins" theory LOL!! Pathetic!

If you got something REAL let us know or shut the hell up!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

“I thought it was rubbish,”

That's what I thought after watching this ham-acted performance. Five raspberries out of five from me.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Why hasn't the video been released again?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

After the yesterday’s press conference of Tomita Naoya's explanation, many people who watched his explanation became to believe that Tomita Naoya didn't steal a Korean journalist's camera. Many people became to know he was intentionally accused of stealing by South Korean Police. Because Tomita Naoya's explanation was very clear and very detailed, so many people think his explanation was enough to be worthy of belief.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

he could have release his statement of not being guilty just days or weeks after returning from s/korea.

I don't know. This is an important thing. I would want to prepare well myself such as finding a good lawyer and let him investigate and prepare for the conference..

Most of us have no experience of being a suspect in another country at a young age with no knowledge of legal right, and being threatened "if you admit, you can go home" or "if you dispute, you go thru long legal battle". I don't know how many of us have guts to not admit.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

let us look at this so called evidence and it might or might not be backed up with a lie detector test.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Love how you actually defend this guy's actions. As if it wasn't obvious he's a damned liar and thief. Just goes to show what kind of expressions some people's blind nationalism can take. Because don't come and tell me you would have defended a Chinese or Korean coming up with the same lame-ass excuse after doing the same things Tomita-kun did. No chance.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

The only person that can initiate to release the video is Tomita. And that is why his lawyer is so confident in telling the public that such footage do not exist or Tomita never was shown such footage because they have no intention of shooting their own foot. The lawyer also was witty enough to claim the JOC member that saw the footage with Tomita didn't see the 'actual' footage because technically it wasn't; they saw it on a smart phone that recorded the footage (surely what was well prepared to fool many but not all).

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I would like to klnow where the heck was his manager during this problem, and why didn't the Japanese Sports Association or who ever was in charge of these Japanese athletes help this kid? Just like Japan, guilty until proven innocent. No common sense, the sponsor who pulled their support before all the facts were in, needs to get a life!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Then who are the Japanese Olympic Committee members who issued statements that they saw the video of him stealing it?

They issued statements to say that they had identified him in the video, but at no time did they actually say they saw him steal the camera.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Then who are the Japanese Olympic Committee members who issued statements that they saw the video of him stealing it?

Bureaucrats. When a bureaucracy is faced with a scandal like this, they have to make a fast decision on limited information. Broadly they can decide to defend him or cut him loose.

If they defend him, they risk facts and kuuki turning out he is indefensible (I think Jiken wanted to defend Obokata, but eventually decided she's indefensible). Even if it turns out he is innocent, there will be many Koreans that would be unwilling to accept that. Further, while it is sorted out, the South Koreans, having already played their card, would find it hard to retract and Tomito would likely be incited and kept under some form of detention for time that might compare to his incarceration had he been proved guilty in trial..

If they don't defend him, they risk something like this. The Japanese right-wingers will blast the JoC regardless of what the truth is. On the other hand, dumping him will limit their worst possible loss (this is always an appealing idea to a bureaucrat). Further, if they lower their heads, it is quite likely the SKs will let the guy go, so in a sense this is a good deal for the guy too.

And in any case, having selected one direction they'd find it hard to change.

I won't make any decisions as to whether the guy is innocent or guilty. But these are factors to consider.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

innocent until proven guilty,,, he who hasn't sinned throw the first stone

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

And it just goes to show you how much reliance we can put on "confessions". So Japan's police with all your (ahem) coercive techniques - take note

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Readers, this discussion has nothing to do with Japan's police. Please stay on topic.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

innocent until proven guilty,,

He was caught on video, identified, then fined, deported, and then suspended - now the books are all closed on this case. Sounds like already proven guilty to me. Just because he does the whining press conference after the facts, doesn't change the outcome of the events.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@Papi

Too easy. There's nothing simple about this "crime" I couldn't care less if he were Japanese, English or American, but this isn't any kind of simple open-and-shut case.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I'm still pretty suspicious of this guy, but this part has me wondering:

“It’s true I confessed to Korean police but I regret doing that. I was scared about how long it would take before they allowed me to go back to Japan.”

I know that this case isn't about the Japanese police, but you have to wonder what would give Tomita this idea. It couldn't have been the behavior of the police in the land of his birth, now could it?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Korean officials were nice to let Japanese view video beforehand. Tomita argues like any thieves who don't know existence of eyes in the sky.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Too late now buddy.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

His explanation was in detail and natural. I think he is innocent. I hope he continues fighting against JOC and SK. I'm glad to hear that his family is supporting him.

Korean officials were nice to let Japanese view video beforehand.

To accuse somebody a thief, it is a common procedure to show "evidence"

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

To accuse somebody a thief, it is a common procedure to show "evidence"

They did - to the JOC. Are you calling the JOC liars?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Professional cameras are heavy. If someone pushed inside of his bag, he would fall on floor? JOC could watch video. Who ould supply his name? I have feeling he is an experienced thief in Japan or wherever he visits. Just my suspicion,

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Too easy. There's nothing simple about this "crime" I couldn't care less if he were Japanese, English or American, but this isn't any kind of simple open-and-shut case.

lucabrasi, there's nothing stopping Tomita from launching a request to Korean police to reopen the case. Why isn't he doing that, if he's got irrefutable evidence and he's convinced the videos are no good? The fact that he's not appealing his case, speaks volumes about his motives. He knows that as long as the case is closed, he can mouth off from his home in the other side of the sea.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Next step is to pressure a JOC official into resigning - this is why the lawyer is necessary despite there being no court case against Tomita in Japan - the lawyer is to represent Tomita at the Kangaroo shame court where the JOC official is accused of treason.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Wow. Just wow. Is it normal in Japan to backtrack and deny something if it leads them to public shame?

This is the impression I get from following Japanese news..and of its politicians. And it's hard to believe this considering my impression that Japan was a developed and respectable country. I still like Japan but it's disappointing to see it again and again

0 ( +2 / -2 )

He was mainly found guilty based on a video.... lets see the video!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Papi2013

Why isn't he doing that, if he's got irrefutable evidence and he's convinced the videos are no good?

Because technically even if he does that and the video turns out to be indeed a PoS, the SK police can still have something of a bone to stand on by claiming he is identified by the JOC (that's the price paid by both him and JOC for their decision to quickly sell him down the river) and also by the fact the camera was, one way or another, found in his bag. They might also somehow "find" appropriate witnesses to reinforce their case. These are things he has to consider.

If we take the scenario that his story is true, Papi2013, how much faith would you place in any country's police to give you a fair re-opening?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

JOC is a corrupt organization to begin with. When they fly, they use executive class for themselves and economy for athletes. (I don't know now)

If the video does not show his stealing , JOC should have talked to Tomita privately without SK police or hired a SK lawyer.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

tinawatanabe: "If the video does not show his stealing , JOC should have talked to Tomita privately without SK police or hired a SK lawyer."

The thing is, the video clearly does show him stealing the camera, and his admittance after the JOC saw it and banned him, as well as his subsequent excuses, prove that. He is pathetic, and so are those that defend him and blame everyone else.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Kazuaki Shimazaki, what possible motives would JOC have to accuse Tomito of thievery?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

@Papi2013

I'm not sure, but just the responses of this thread and the previous one (when it was reported he confessed) may give you some insights as to the possibilities. In particular, count how many commentators blasted Tomito, praised the JOC for cutting him loose, or both - though it isn't like he has been convicted yet.

This is what the Japanese call kuuki and the term "social atmosphere" is likely to work with Americans as well. When considering a response, regardless of the facts you ignore kuuki at your peril.

I'm not saying that's necessarily what happened. But it is a motive.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Video and fingerprints are all presented as evidence now. Until final verdict, we will not be able to see video.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

what possible motives would JOC have to accuse Tomito of thievery?

To avoid being accused of poor handling of the situation, then JOC top would have to take the responsibility. The lawyer at the conference said he could not reached to the JOC official who actually saw the video for questioning.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

JOC is not accuser. /JOC is one type of witnesses to identify the thief on video. So, JOC identified Tomita, the thief on video.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Maybe my heart was weak,” he added, tears rolling down his cheeks. well he should be on a national swimming team if thats the case, time to quit and become a politician.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Whoever supporting him shoulf teach how security cameras are used so that he will stop stealing ianywhere. JOC does not need a thief in its team. There are many Japanese excellent swimmers who are not a thief.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

What amuses me most in JT’s forum is that it does not matter how scandalous and shameless Japanese nationals who violate the laws or commit fraud were, there are still some predictable people defending wrondoers blindly or use radicular excuses to make a case for them , regardless.

Here is the thing Tomita did something terrible wrong, he knew it ,and his attorney knew it. The time to spent for splitting hair won’t save his skin in the end. In hindsight, Obokata’s drama acts did not make any deference even though Japanophiles here tried every possible angles to guard her so called “innocence”.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Of course it is possible that the video image was not 100% clear, or that the actual moment of theft was obscured in some way. Perhaps the JOC official reasoned that the individual had to be Tomita ASSUMING that it was actually a member of the uniformed Japanese swimming team, and not a look-alike in disguise who was as part of an brilliant and elaborate Korean plot.

Likely? Not really. And then there is Tomita's oh-so-weak-kneed behavior in the face of the "enemy".

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Most of us have no experience of being a suspect in another country at a young age with no knowledge of legal right, and being threatened "if you admit, you can go home" or "if you dispute, you go thru long legal battle". I don't know how many of us have guts to not admit.

I think you will find some of the people on this forum DO - in Japan. Me included. So tell me Tina Watanabe - does the same standard apply in reverse?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I must admit confusion at the frequent characterization offered above that Japanese don't take responsibility for wrong-doing.

I'm talking about the people in general here, and not those in positions of power.

I've lived on this rock for my fair share, done so on different continents and have had the fortune to get to know a wide variety of lands and peoples. IMO, out of all major industrial nations*, no other place is populated with a people more concerned with honesty when it comes to performance of duty. This emphasis on right conduct comes with the inevitable need to make amends when that trust is violated.

Swedes, Danes and Finns, Norwegians, Swiss, Aussies and Kiwis, Canadians, Singaporeans and Costa Ricans rate high and higher in my book as well. But they are small/ mid-sized.
0 ( +0 / -0 )

@tinawatanabe ... Most of us have no experience of being a suspect in another country at a young age with no knowledge of legal right, and being threatened "if you admit, you can go home" or "if you dispute, you go thru long legal battle". I don't know how many of us have guts to not admit.

After being hit from behind by a motorcycle on Aomei kaido, flying through the air, knocking off the wing mirror of a car with my shoulder, and lying unconscious in the gutter with my bicycle for unknown time, I regained consciousness and saw a policeman and the motorcyclist happily chatting away ignoring me completely. Later, I was requested to go the police station to fill out a form. The same policeman asked me to write a description of the accident, which I did. He looked at it, crumpled it up, and threw it in the wastebasket. He filled out a new form himself and told me sign it. ...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

CraigHicks, I'm glad that you were OK in the terrible accident. Didn't the police call an ambulance for you?

About the police officer filling out the form himself, I have a similar experience with the police. In my case, the officer filled it out from the beginning.

Some clerical mistakes could evlove into an unexpected outcome, so I wanted to be careful judging Tomita's case. But I noticed one thing, If I assume he is a kleptmaniac, then everything I thought strange could be explained.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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