crime

Tattooist fined for operating without medical certification

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15 Comments
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Piecing ears are in the same boat in Japan. Unless you do it yourself only licensed doctors are allowed to do it by law. Pretty weird if you ask me.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

Very silly that it even went to court.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

@sensei258 Genuinely curious: Have you ever, in fact, been to a tattoo studio in Japan? They are not sharing needles and using the ink from ballpoint pens, as if it were a scene from a movie about life in prison.

And yes: by this logic what makes it different than getting a piercing?

Just like restaurants and supermarkets have governing departments to ensure sanitary conditions, do the same with tattoo studios. But don't infringe on the livelihoods of these artists and those who want tattoos.

I would suspect people supporting this decision merely don't like the idea of a tattoo.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

I don't know about a "medical" certification, but I think some sort would be a good idea. There's a lot of blood involved in tattooing, and withour proper sterilization of equipment, diseases like hepatitis and HIV could be spread between customers

5 ( +9 / -4 )

This is just another example of the inherit bias and discrimination that Japan is rampant with, most foreigners don't experience it till they live here, the conservative older generation in Japan are responsible for making laws and enforcing views that are not only based on no evidence but are in fact discriminatory.

With respect; there is bias in every country. Depending on where you find yourself; it may seem ridiculous. But it is not as widespread as you make it out to be.

Certainly my tattoos do not cause univeral grief in Japan and more onsens have made no fuss about them than those that did. And even then, it was just a question of covering them up after I enquired.

I'm sorry you are not enjoying your time here. Try and focus on the positives of this warm and welcoming country.

Remember that ignorant people in many countries sneer at tattoos.

And good luck with the new tattoo!

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Who brought this to court?

What can you do in Japan without having to get someone's special permission?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Maybe after 2020, when the nation sees the influx of gaijin with tattoos, this age-old bias against them may finally start to fade.

There will be a big influx of people with tattoos in 2019 for the Rugby World Cup, as well.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

"I will continue to fight at a high court to restore my life," he said.

Good for him! Maybe after 2020, when the nation sees the influx of gaijin with tattoos, this age-old bias against them may finally start to fade.

Koike's new "Hope" party promises to bring changes to take Japan into the modern age. I wish them success.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I'm not allowed one cause when I'm old, I can't have a MRI or CT scan.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Well damn the man!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

No matter how nice and friendly the tattooist, no matter how clean his studio, no matter how well-sterilised his needles are, there is little to no monitoring or regulation of the pigments and chemicals used, and none are approved for injection into the skin for cosmetic purposes.

The chemicals used in tattoos can include industrial pigments originally produced for use in car paints, printer toner and writing inks.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/3074647.stm

https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm048919.htm

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Hey jackass - needles are "tossed or autoclaved" after use. Just as cross contamination best practices are followed. Cables and tools are wrapped in plastic prior to each use, as well as sterilized. Artists use tattoos inks which are made solely to be used for tattooing. It's obvious you are prejudiced against tattooing, we get it. But you're speaking out of the side of your mouth on this issue.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I have two very large tattoo's which can never be covered. With that said I really enjoyed my time in Tokyo and will return many times before I die. I have no urge to use an Onsen and my time living on a ship will hopefully be the last naked man I encounter. I realize tattoo's are looked down upon and there are no regulations in Japan, or inspections for safety. I can't imagine why anyone would want to be a tattoo artist in Japan when they know it is against the law.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@sensei258 Genuinely curious: Have you ever, in fact, been to a tattoo studio in Japan? They are not sharing needles and using the ink from ballpoint pens, as if it were a scene from a movie about life in prison.

No I haven't, in fact, been to a Japanese tattoo parlor. But that doesn't change the fact that tattooing causes bleeding, thus contaminating the equipment and increasing the possibility of contagion. Needles should be tossed or steam-sterilized after use.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

As someone who recently started getting my first tattoo in Osaka I can say with first hand experience that the artist are friendly and very accommodating.

The studio I am going to is clean, and all the equipment is put through stringent cleaning processes, the shop also had signs up saying they can refuse to tattoo you if they believe you to be part of an organised crime syndicate.

If someone got tattooed and had an allergic reaction, i don't see how that responsibility falls on the artist, if your conscious of the fact that you have a preexisting allergy or condition you shouldn't be getting tattooed in the first place, and like any body art it comes with certain risks which you should consider before doing it.

This is just another example of the inherit bias and discrimination that Japan is rampant with, most foreigners don't experience it till they live here, the conservative older generation in Japan are responsible for making laws and enforcing views that are not only based on no evidence but are in fact discriminatory.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

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