crime

Top court orders retrial of ex-nurse aide convicted in 2003 murder

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But the high court pointed to the possibility of a natural death, adding that Nishiyama's confession has changed so many times that her statements may not be based on her experience. The high court also said she may have made a false confession after she started to feel for her investigator.

Perhaps yet another case of a false / coerced confession because of Japan's detention and interrogation system.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Looks like another case of forced confession and false conviction that ruined an innocent person’s life.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

My question is by what authority did she have the right to remove the respirator in the first place? She was an assistant, not a nurse, so she had no authority to remove it on her own. which makes her very culpable in his death, whether he died by natural causes or otherwise, and the respirator could have been reinserted as well.

She served her time.

There is a hell of a lot missing from this article about the circumstances surrounding the "removal" of the tube and how long afterwards the patient actually died.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Big surprise......NOT!

When will Japan bring its band of THUGS, known at times as prosecutors, under some form of control.

They clearly are left to do WHATEVER to WHOEVER they please!!

Personally, I think Japan is SO BAD with ""confessions" that they should NO LONGER be admissible in courts!

Prosecution MUST make their case in a court of LAW....

What a novel concept....well it IS in Japan!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

My question is by what authority did she have the right to remove the respirator in the first place? She was an assistant, not a nurse, so she had no authority to remove it on her own. which makes her very culpable in his death, whether he died by natural causes or otherwise, and the respirator could have been reinserted as well.

If I understand well, there is doubt she removed the respirator at all.

The patient may have died of natural causes, and the police then accused her and coerced her to confess she did remove the respirator. Which wouldn't be that surprising in Japan.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

@GW. Not all prosecutes are bad. It is the rotten eggs in the police station. My prosecutor for jaywalking even admitted to me it was a waste of her time, my time and police time. The only good thing that came out of it was I signed a confession (in Japanese which I could not read), and was released after 7 hours. I told I would be detained for 48 hours if I didn’t sign. 7 hours is better than 48 hours and the prosecutor even apologized to me. No fine.

12 years if your innocent...omg

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

My prosecutor for jaywalking even admitted to me it was a waste of her time, my time and police time. 

I for one would love to hear the prosecutors story on this one. You have stated this story a number of times here, and it is incredulous to believe that any cops or prosecutors would take anyone to court for a jaywalking offense.

There is a HELL of a lot more to THIS story too!

The only good thing that came out of it was I signed a confession (in Japanese which I could not read), and was released after 7 hours. I told I would be detained for 48 hours if I didn’t sign. 7 hours is better than 48 hours and the prosecutor even apologized to me. No fine.

You call being found guilty of a crime a "good thing"?

I was nailed for driving without a valid license, way back, long story.....which is a hell of a lot worse than jaywalking here, never went to court, detained only for processing, paid close to 300,00 fine a couple of weeks later, and that was it.

SOmething is fishy about the jaywalking story here!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

When will Japan bring its band of THUGS, known at times as prosecutors, under some form of control.

Maybe the prosecutors office at Kasumigaseki should be renamed "New Kenpetai Headquarters".

But the problem also lies with judges, who just rubber stamp whatever the prosecutor says. They must start developing minds of their own.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Yubaru is right. A CNA has no business removing a ventilator. That would be for a doctor, RN, or Respiratory Therapist to do.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The male patient was found dead at a hospital room on May 22, 2003.

What day was the tube removed? Also why didn't anyone reinsert it?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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