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Toyota exec in Japan resigns over drug arrest

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Ok...did she split her gut too? Figures she would resign, but now what does the prosecutors office do? I'll bet slap on the wrist and send her packing home to the USA.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Very unfortunate indeed.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

If she were going to break the law, she surely would have imported more than a few tablets.

-10 ( +12 / -22 )

If she were going to break the law, she surely would have imported more than a few tablets

She did break the law.

27 ( +37 / -10 )

In less than two weeks in Japan, she set back women's AND foreigner causes back years. Well done.

23 ( +35 / -12 )

She did break the law. Excuse me. I should have said, "If she had intended to break the law..." Obviously they found drugs, and she said she imported them. My point was that her statement that she didn't believe she had imported narcotics is probably true. There are quite a few medicines that are legal in one country and not in another.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

Sayonara! She made a bad mistake not exercising due diligence.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Yes, it's spun to make her sound suspicious, but I guesss the old boys network is rubbing their hands at Japan Inc, theyve just got rid of another potentially meddlesome foreigner, a woman to boot !

1 ( +2 / -3 )

Yabaru, of course that's all she'll get. Mission complete. Prevented 'another' female from holding a high position in Japan.

-3 ( +8 / -12 )

"several tablets"

So, we're talking 3 or 4 pills.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

It's plain and simple. We are accountable for our choices. There will be consequences for those choices, both good and bad. Your choice determine your destiny. As you know it is often by our mistakes that we learn, if we deny our mistakes or fail to take responsibility we fail to learn and improve. Every mistake, every catastrophe is a life experience, part of your life story. Ms. Hamp still has a great future ahead of her .

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I'll accept all the bad points but I'm sticking to my guns. I've been here long enough to feel confident to say that had she been a guy, none of this would have hit the media. And she didn't "import" drugs. She shipped her medication to herself.

-6 ( +11 / -17 )

“We believe it will become clear that Ms Hamp did not intend to break the law… Ms Hamp is a dear colleague whom I trust,” Toyoda said.

Yeah right .. oxycodone is the rich man's heroin, and I absolutely cannot believe that she didn't know what she was doing. Nobody labels legitimate drugs as "necklace" and sends it to themselves via parcel.

If she were going to break the law, she surely would have imported more than a few tablets.

Even if this were Tylenol, it would still be illegal because she declared a drug as being something else. If this isn't drug smuggling then I don't what is.

Sorry but not buying one bit of her story. She was a top exec is one of the richest companies in the world. I am not buying that she is that stupid to have not known what she was dong is illegal. She definitely knew what she was doing, and only sorry that she got caught doing it.

And lastly, if the meds were legit, why not produce the prescription? At the very least, it would tell customs that she needed the drugs and also offset some of this media attention.

9 ( +15 / -6 )

why not produce the prescription?

Because nobody prescribed 50 of these extremely powerful pills...you need less than 10 after a painful procedure.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

Dear me. How ridiculous, that anyone should try and tie this to women's rights. If it had been a man, his gender wouldn't have been an issue at all. Not all men, right? Not all women either.

-1 ( +7 / -9 )

Let us take a look again. The defense is obviously readying to claim it was "Daddy" (likely they will say he is doddering etc.) who sent the packages to make it appear that Ms. Hamp is not the person importing the drug; apparently US law says using the Postal Service upon committing a felony to be a Federal offense. She'd be in big trouble if this were to be proven [handwriting analysis time]. The news article says, "The package, labelled 'necklaces', contained several small boxes, each holding accessories and several tablets, reports have said, adding that police suspect there had been an attempt to hide the drug." To be honest, a guy sending stuff but labeling them "necklaces" seems highly unlikely - assuming I didn't know what the content was, several small packages I'd say "accessories" or if pressed for details and specific for my daughter I may say "ribbons" but no way "necklaces" would come to mind... BTW several times several makes more than a dozen pills so probably not 3 or 4 pills.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Please?! Can somebody explain to me? She has not mailed the medicine to herself! Her father has done so. Why is she being held responsible for her father's action?! It can only be assumed that she would use the medicine but it has not reached her at all. Let me make an example: if somebody knows your address and mails similar prescription medicine to your address from abroad just to have you arrested, well, that is very easy now, isn't it?

-12 ( +5 / -17 )

"several tablets"

So, we're talking 3 or 4 pills.

Actually a total of 57 pills, divided between and hidden in a number of boxes within boxes.

http://mainichi.jp/graph/2015/06/25/20150625k0000m040135000c/003.html

her statement that she didn't believe she had imported narcotics is probably true.

When you believe your actions are above-board, you don't hide the stuff in false bottoms under junk (a high-flying executive with a major company importing 'toy necklaces'?) and 'forget' to mention the stuff on the import declaration form. If she believed there would be no problem bringing the stuff in, she would have left it all in the bottle it came in and posted it with a proper label on it.

it's spun to make her sound suspicious

Her actions were suspicious.

A person doesn't get to her position by being dumb or stupid or naive; she knew what she was doing, and what she was doing was trying to smuggle an illegal substance into the country.

24 ( +28 / -4 )

I sometimes find it shocking how easy it is to torpedo your own career with a small mistake, got to be careful,,,

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Ned: Excellent point.

Just like the woman principal was arrested at Sacred Heart International School for bringing in Pot, she will be found guilty, sentenced but suspended, taken to the airport and told never to come back again. Career finished.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

@nedinjapan"Can somebody explain to me?She has not mailed medicine to herself! Her father has done so. Why is she being held responsible for her father's action?"

Because she was top executive of US branch of Toyota. She tried to cheat custom and police officers of Japan. So, she can not be trustworthy anymore. Say "daddy" that smuggling drugs to foreign country is illegal.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

nedinjapan - She knew about it, had planned to take the drugs, and was thus arrested. It's not like the J-cops are total rubes and couldn't piece all that together.

Why she didn't just carry the drugs with a prescription is waaaay beyond me. Some "executive" she is.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

She's basically hooked on the pills and arranged for an illegal shipment labeled "jewellry" in which the 57 pills were packaged into a number of comparments around some actual cheap jewellry. Not very clever. Perhaps more suited to GM than Toyota!

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Hamp “said she did not believe she had imported narcotics when she was arrested”, a police official has said.

It was all split up and hidden, had she kept it in one bottle, maybe and a big maybe this defense could be used.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Hopefully her now going through cold turkey she can kick her drug habit, at least something good may come of this colossal mistake!

She is also lucky she is not some young person who isn't a Caucasian, she will likely get kicked out at some point.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I think her actions were suspicious and she broke the law. Nonetheless seems to me not such a big deal. Plenty of drugs you can get on prescription in Japan that you can't even take into other countries like the US (Rohypnol?/). so she will do her 21 days and then they will send her home. Shame for her as she could clearly have done well at toyotoa as their most senior gaijin female......

2 ( +5 / -3 )

She was an idiot for pulling this stunt, but I feel bad for her.

Can you imagine being arrested in a foreign country that can hold you for 20+ days in jail, WITHDRAWING FROM OPIATES while in jail, and then losing your job and being disgraced in the international press?

Should we put her on suicide watch?

4 ( +5 / -2 )

Ms. Julie Hamp in concealing the Oxycodone within a package, then labelling 'necklaces', is complicit to the act of importing a controlled substance without permission or a physicians prescription, the resignation was inevitable.

Hold your hands up, as a Head of Global Public Relation, it insulting the intelligence of judicial system of Japan pretending otherwise.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Don't put her on antidepressants - probably get hooked on that too! Doesn't she have a husband who can support her... rather than just a doting dad who's willing to take the dive for his daughter, feign that he is doddering and do time in the Federal penitentiary? I truly feel sorry for him; now if he needs a good son-in-law who can also straighten up his daughter...

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Yet another foreign exec doing something to make us all look bad and give locals more reason not to globalize their boards.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Liberals always breaking law...but 57 tablets is not that heaven fall on earth it is small cheating....

-14 ( +0 / -14 )

Excuse me?! How can you Prove that was Her Intent?! Legal evidence is different from layman's assumptions. She Did Not mail the medicine! She was at the receiving point but the Post office captured the medicine in their Routine check. How can they prove she Planned or Ordered the mailing of the medicine? My point is that legally, you cannot prove that, and it is not even a street drug. She could have avoided all this if she had her father travel to japan with the medicine. Nobody would check the Presciption drugs her father would bring in.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

I call BS. She can't claim to have not known better when she was clearly trying to and conceal the drugs within the package. Then, mislabeling it. If her father had sent it to her, I have strong doubts that she didn't know about it. At the very least, she had to have been aware for taking a strong drug into another country was not allowed which is why she was trying to be sneaky. She got caught, and now she has to pay the very steep consequences.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

@Ned

Please?! Can somebody explain to me? She has not mailed the medicine to herself! Her father has done so. Why is she being held responsible for her father's action?!

The police believe that she and her father are working together in a joint criminal enterprise to import the drugs into Japan. So it doesn't just depend on who physically sent the package, as long as she had some part in the planned crime. Imagine that we agree to burgle a house and I wait in the car as the getaway driver while you go inside. As long as we are working together with a common purpose, we will both be burglars even though I have never entered the property.

But you're right that if somebody simply sends you drugs in the mail without your knowledge, then the situation is different because you are not working together to commit any crime.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

ha, oxycodone is a prescription drug in the usa as well, when you couple the fact that to get the drug in the US the father would have to go to his doctor and get a prescription- there is no way you would mistake the drug for an aspirin

on top of that this is an executive- not a 15 year old high school drop out, and the method to cover up the drug- in separate containers to try to conceal the scent from drug dogs- sorry , this is a long standing user.

it is a good thing the arrest was made, perhaps proper treatment will take place and she will be able to come to grips with the issue

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I think she is innocent because if she had had intent she would have hid the drugs in a bodily orifice.

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

Julie Hamp, resigned , which is not a direct admission of guilt, and due process is not complete, so innocent until proven guilty. Julie Hamp needed the oxycodone to quote ease problems with her knees, what possessed Ms Hamp not to seek the advice of a Doctor?...

2 ( +3 / -1 )

praack Oxycodone is esily available online in the US. My guerss is she didn't go to a doctor here (or there) as she doesn't actually have any real medical problem but likes the buzz you can get off of Oxycodone.....

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Should we put her on suicide watch?

Repatriation watch.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

AIMS Our public forums include many differing opinions and experiences. You are certain to find opinions that you disagree with and some that you may find offensive. Our aim at all times is to provide a place where the maximum discussion can take place, even if it offends some people.

We try to be as fair as we can when moderating but in a large community of users, with many different viewpoints, there will always be some people that will not be happy with our moderation policies. While we regret that this happens, please realize that we cannot suit all of the people all of the time and have to make decisions based on what is best for the forum overall.

This is all a load of tosh really, as I've had every post this morning deleted. Due to the mods being vindictive little guttersnipes

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Seems a bit harsh for "several" tablets. Maybe there is more to this than we know.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@nedinjapan

First of all, why wouldn't she be guilty? Are you implying that her father mailed her the drugs to deliberately try to frame her for possession? Why else would he mail her the drugs?

Secondly, she admitted that the drugs were hers and that she intended on using them when she said that she was "using them for her knees". If her father mailed her the drugs without her knowing about it, or without her asking him to do it, wouldn't it have made more sense for her to completely deny ownership of the drugs?

Those were HER drugs, there is no debate about it; she's even admitted to that. Whether her father is equally guilty is left up to the courts to decide, but there is no way she can completely deny responsibility, when she has already admitted ownership and intent of use.

Lastly, she resigned from Toyota. That should be the biggest clue. If she truly was innocent of this crime, then why did she resign, especially when the CEO has stated that he supports her fully? She knows she's guilty, so she's resigned because she knows that there is no chance of returning to her cozy little execute office at work anytime soon.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Oh c'mon people! She was given a choice. Resign or be fired! There is no way they were ever gonna let her keep her job.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

How did her father get a Rx for more than 50 pills? Most one can get at one time is 10.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

She is an addict, pill popper. It will come out later when she returns to USA. Many CEOs and top corporate people are addicted to drugs, from Hollywood to car firms.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I think she is innocent because if she had had intent she would have hid the drugs in a bodily orifice.

Reckless - With that streetwise guile, you must have watched a lot of Matlock.

Many CEOs and top corporate people are addicted to drugs, from Hollywood to car firms.

Danny Bloom - when Im not yelling at kids to get off my lawn, I say the same thing.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

For the sake of wider social awareness, I hope the authorities throw the book at her and prosecute to the full extent of the law. Although that sounds harsh, in the long run it is probably better than the usual slap over the wrist and deportation. This is Japan, and rightly and wrongly, its laws should be respected and enforced, irrespective of whether somebody is some poor schmuck English teacher or here on an expat gig. Indeed, would similar behavior be allowed in the US? As at least one person pointed out above, transporting a quantity of opiates over state lines in the US would get you a date in court.

Again, the worst thing Japan could do would be to not prosecute this woman because it sends the wrong message.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

You have to wonder how much back ground investigation major manufacturers actually do before they hire someone at that level of position. Shoot, I have to take a drug test for a mediocre job and a company like Toyota hires drug addicts without screening their back ground or even a pee test.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Ned - How of much of the article did you not understand? She already said the stuff was for her bad knees.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

In Japan workers are not screened for drugs and alcohol.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Jalapeno, I think the point is that she is not receving proper Legal Defense. From the start, she was shown as Guilty for "having prescription medicine mailed to her"? She did not mail, and she had not received the mail and not used the medicine yet! The only law broken, is the law of sending Prescription medicine by postal mail! This is the legal fact! But here in Japan, "accusation" is equal to "guilt". They put her in 23 days of detention without a case and make her accept that she would use the medicine, she ordered its mailing, ... without a lawyer representing her to be able to put a "legal defense". Are we living in North Korea where assumptions and pressure can take the place of the right of people to defend themselves based on "legal skills"?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I think she is innocent because if she had had intent she would have hid the drugs in a bodily orifice.

Ignoring the fact that this is not very good logic whatsoever, even if you were right, it would only mean she didn't didn't intentionally break the law. It wouldn't mean she was innocent of the crime itself. Regardless of her intent, her actions were illegal, and that is what would determine guilt or innocence, her intent wouldn't be the determining factor.

You have to wonder how much back ground investigation major manufacturers actually do before they hire someone at that level of position.

From what I've read, it doesn't appear she was a new hire, she was simply transferred to Japan for her new position. She may very well have started using these pills after she was hired. And if she had a prescription, she was likely using them legally, so a drug test in the US wouldn't have mattered, while in Japan they do not do drug tests.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The lesson to be learnt is not to employ American yuppies - chances are they'll be on something!

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Why didn't she go to the local doctor and get these tablets on prescription? I think she come unstuck when they were sent as necklaces it looks like it was a deliberate move to import these tablets. silly woman, now she lost her job.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

but now what does the prosecutors office do? I'll bet slap on the wrist and send her packing home to the USA. no different when there are scandals with Japanese staff in J companies. deep bow, apologise, business as usual

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Toyota must be reeling from the bad publicity, but also a little relieved to be rid of a top executive with a drug problem

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Dear me. How ridiculous, that anyone should try and tie this to women's rights. If it had been a man, his gender wouldn't have been an issue at all. Not all men, right? Not all women either.

Maria - Do you honestly believe the geriatrics that run Japan will be so open minded?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

without a lawyer representing her to be able to put a "legal defense". Are we living in North Korea where assumptions and pressure can take the place of the right of people to defend themselves based on "legal skills"?

Japan is no North Korea. You are entitled to retain lawyers during the investigation. Don't worry, I think Toyota and US Embassy are helping her.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

She will need to admit to her crime, apologise for her wrongful behaviour and then she'll be allowed to go back to America.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@LBW2010

"Can you imagine being arrested in a foreign country that can hold you for 20+ days in jail"

Hmm, how about the USA? For example, its Guantanamo prison - some prisoners have been there for over twelve years (see Wikipedia) without trial.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

She will need to admit to her crime, apologise for her wrongful behaviour and then she'll be allowed to go back to America.

I'm not so sure. She may need to spend some time in jail because this is not possession of drug but smuggling.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I'm not so sure. She may need to spend some time in jail because this is not possession of drug but smuggling.

Probably not and just like the recent case of an American/Canadian women who moved from Korea to Japan to take up a teaching job but was caught with banned prescription drugs from her doctor mother. She was arrested but had the charges dropped and returned home.

Japan needs to be strong to show punishment but not too weak that others are encouraged. These were prescription drugs and not narcotics although made from opium and for personal use. She has already lost her well earning employment.

"Can you imagine being arrested in a foreign country that can hold you for 20+ days in jail"

Well recently I discovered there are 80,000 convicts kept in strict solitary confinement, some for many decades and I was shocked the country was the leader of the free world and also how many are in prison for life for possession of small amounts but three strikes and your out?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

She may need to spend some time in jail because this is not possession of drug but smuggling.

They will have her for possession as well. When drugs are shipped, they deliver them, and when the person takes possession they arrest them.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

All this big news over her and very little will happen. The authorities just want to show "the world" what they can do and marvel over the fact that they can keep people in custody for 23 days without an indictment. She will be released and sent home back to the United States. End of story - forgotten.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Oxycondone is one of THE most-abused prescription drugs out there--that's why there are extremely strict rules in place on its dispensing to users (I know that my medical provider only allows pickup of oxycondone prescriptions in person at a pharmacy).

Julie Hamp should have mentioned her pain issues to the people at Toyota--they could have arranged for legal pickup of oxycondone from a Japanese pharmacy in the Nagoya area (where I believe most Toyota executives live and work).

3 ( +3 / -0 )

What is the attraction to this story to get so many comments I just don't understand. Why do so many care what happens or doesn't happen to this lady.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

A developed society holds its citizens innocent until proven otherwise. Here they are Assuming she is guilty of Drug Abuse, Smuggling, ... which is mind blowing. Apparently this is a society somewhere between the cruelty of North Korea and respect to autonomy seen in advanced nations. It is still sad there is little sympathy to the Accused. Yes, she should have her father deliver her prescription drugs rather than sending it through a mailing service. Take green tea for your headache lady, this is Japan ...

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

This is so depressing... Pour me another double scotch!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Julie, forget the japanese and go work for GM, Ford, Fiat, VW, Mercedes, BMW, Renault. I think you will be well received in these companies and these countries (USA, Italy, Germany, France) will not bully you because of some stupid pain pills.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

The authorities just want to show "the world" what they can do

No. The authorities are just doing their jobs.

and marvel over the fact that they can keep people in custody for 23 days without an indictment.

How many days in your country? Those number of days are deducted from the jail time.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

This is a health problem. She needs treatment. At least she wasn't falling down drunk in the street like some people. Drug addiction and alcoholism are health problems. People just need help. Prison time is a waste of money and effort.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@ nedinjapan "A developed society holds its citizens innocent until proven otherwise. Here they are Assuming she is guilty of Drug Abuse, Smuggling, ... which is mind blowing....... Yes, she should have her father deliver her prescription drugs rather than sending it through a mailing service...."

In most countries the police arrest people on the assumption that they have committed a crime, do they not? She has not yet gone to trial nor been convicted, therefore she is legally presumed innocent at this point. But that doesn't mean she won't be questioned, investigated. You seem to be assuming that she had a prescription. Based on what?

@ FernandoUchiyama "....these countries (USA, Italy, Germany, France) will not bully you because of some stupid pain pills."

She's not been bullied, she's been arrested. People with prescription drugs but without a prescription get arrested in other countries too.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

One thing not often mentioned: the package declared on the outside as "jewelry" in it, which had the pills not in a clearly marked bottle, but interspersed in nooks and crannies throughout the goods, didn't actually have "real" jewelry in it. It was fake/plastic/toy jewelry... something no well paid / high power executive would ever wear in public or private or for work. She doesn't have any children, so it wasn't for her.

Why would you import toy plastic jewelry?

One reason is so that when a parcel goes through the x-ray at postal customs, it appears that the contents of the package match the description on the EMS customs label.

For somebody that claims to have not known or not intended to break the law, her actions sure look like somebody that understood the finer art of "smuggling techniques."

I'm sure that's just an incredible coincidence, of course.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

This is a good example for folks to make good "cultural" and "litigation" checks before going to Japan or any other country. From the prospective of an American like me, this seems to be a crazy thing that the Japanese authorities did. But it doesn't seem that way either to the Japanese or the expats living there. Live, learn and don't do what this person did ; I'll always say.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I don't know why an educated, powerful women would resort to having pain killers forbidden in Japan sent to her. And hidden among fake jewelry at that. Even in the States, no doctor would prescribe 50 tablets at once. She must be well connected to have gotten so much at one time. Why didn't she just go through proper procedure in bringing these drugs into Japan?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Most of you think this is not your problem and she did some wrong to deserve this but let me tell you what is happening to all of us, including Japanese nationals. This is an example of "criminalization" of non-criminal personal issues. It gives the ruling authorities the power to look into our personal lives. Here we are talking about a successful business woman having recently travelled to Japan for her job, who has difficulty communicating her health issues to Japanese doctors, having asked her FATHER to get her a strong pain medication (that is available by prescription) and her father being worried but not being a smuggler does a very naive packing of the tablets he can send to his daughter. Now you are Criminalizing this case which means you do not know who Smugglers are, what Drugs are and How much drug is being abused in Tokyo and Nagoya ... I hope she goes back to an advanced democratic country and never returns to this place till we all become deserving of such professionals. I am not buying another Toyota from the managers who sold her out to the police ...

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

This is an example of "criminalization" of non-criminal personal issues.

Maybe that's why Japan ranks one of the lowest in the number of criminals.

It gives the ruling authorities the power to look into our personal lives.

If you are a criminal suspect, yes.

Now you are Criminalizing this case which means you do not know who Smugglers are, what Drugs are and How much drug is being abused in Tokyo and Nagoya ...

How much drug is being abused in Tokyo and Nagoya? All the more reason Japan should be strict about the drugs.

I am not buying another Toyota from the managers who sold her out to the police ...

Toyota did not fire her. She resigned maybe for the legal strategy.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Ned - so if someone were to ask their father to mail them marijuana, and they had a prescription in their home country, would you feel the same?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

If she had pain and needed pain killers she should have tried acupuncture instead of pill popping and works even when pills fail.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Strangerland; thanks, you said it! No, marijuana is not a prescription drug in the US or Japan. The difference here is that this is a prescription drug for pain in the US.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

No, marijuana is not a prescription drug in the US or Japan

It is in the US. Not in all states, but in many of them.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Tinawatanabe; you should worry about police behavior in your country. Just last month police stopped to check my driver's license and then asked me who was the lady with me in the car? She was my niece but I was surprised that they even asked. Why did they stop me? Probably it had something to do with my sunglasses! Well, I simply was let go after showing them all my IDs (residence, work, drivers license). This is about limits of personal freedom. So much for stories of agents following you in North Korea! This American lady is not a drug smuggler, is not a drug addict, and does not deserve such treatment. She might be taking the pain medication for her menses for one! I wish I were her lawyer and would provide the Japanese media with a deserving public response!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@ned

This American lady is not a drug smuggler, is not a drug addict,

Going by the facts as they've been portrayed so far, she's actually both.

However, I'd agree she's being treated incredibly harshly. She needs medical treatment, not a prison sentence.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@lucabrasi

However, I'd agree she's being treated incredibly harshly.

She has been treated no more harshly than anyone else. She's in a detention center while the police and public prosecutor investigate her and that happens with every person arrested and detained. I'm guessing before long she'll be back home in the States and will probably never leave it again.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Lucabrasi, A drug smuggler sells or passes on the drug to sellers. a drug addict smokes or sniffs and does not have a serious job as an international manager. Yes, you can Criminalize many various activities by setting a Blind Overall law that covers good and bad people altogether.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

A drug smuggler sells or passes on the drug to sellers. a drug addict smokes or sniffs

No. A smuggler moves stuff illegally into or out of a country. A drug smuggler moves drugs illegally into or out of a country. An addict is physically or mentally dependent on a particular substance and unable to stop taking it without incurring adverse effects. A drug addict is physically or mentally dependent on a drug or drugs and unable to stop taking it/them without incurring adverse effects.

Sounds like Ms Hamp to a T.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

A drug smuggler sells or passes on the drug to sellers

A drug smuggler smuggles drugs. The end user is irrelevant as to whether or not the drugs were smuggled, and therefore the person who transports them is a smuggler regardless of whether or not they use them or sell them.

a drug addict smokes or sniffs and does not have a serious job as an international manager

You're incorrect on this as well. Drug addiction is indifferent to social class. There have been many cases of people in high profile positions who were hiding an addiction.

Luca was correct in his original comment that it appears she was likely both a smuggler and an addict.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@zichi

Agree completely. She doesn't deserve special treatment because of her nationality or job. I rather meant that all drug addicts need to be treated medically and with compassion, whether in Japan, Europe or wherever. Nobody should be locked up for what is, essentially, a disease.

@ned

Can't agree. By any dictionary definition she smuggled drugs and is claearly an addict. The fact that the pills were for her own use doesn't negate the smuggling factor. The fact that she's a high-flying businesswoman doesn't mean she's not addicted to a drug.

Still, best of luck to her. I've been in a very similar place....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

OK guys. You make scientific definitions now? Half the world is addict to coffee or tea or cigarettes! Haven't you seen an actual addict in your life? College students abuse more prescription drugs before-after their exams these days! Put them all in jail? Yes, I see your use of science ...

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@ned

Not scientific. Legal.

I'd readily agree that the laws are contradictory and inconsistent, but they're still the laws....

Let's hope for a bit of enlightened change.... : )

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Back on topic please.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

nedinjapan

Just last month police stopped to check my driver's license and then asked me who was the lady with me in the car?

What's wrong with that?

This is about limits of personal freedom.

You probably looked suspicious to him. He is doing his job.

This American lady is not a drug smuggler, is not a drug addict

Don't worry. They won't indict her if that is the case.

and does not deserve such treatment.

She deserves being investigated.

I wish I were her lawyer and would provide the Japanese media with a deserving public response!

From the way you talk, I think she would refuse.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Just let me tell you I am not much upset as I am amazed by this situation. If there were SMART comedians in this country like Jon Stewart, Bill Maher, ... (not those clowns smacking the crotches of one another) we could all have a laugh about this thing having reached to such a level of national security! John Oliver has a program "How is this still a thing?" That applies very well to your justification of 23 days of detention for Receiving prescription pain-killers from one's father after arriving in Japan for a month?! I am just wondering what is going on in her brain now: what did you think when you were offered this position in "Japan"? No wonder she has resigned. She must have had enough of the interrogation where they are asking her about the schools she went to, her brothers and sisters and other relatives and just intrude into her life like she was a born criminal for Receiving pain medication from her dad ... Go back home lady. God saved you from wasting a lifetime here and realizing what was going on after all that.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@ned

Yep. Agree with every word of that.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What's wrong with that? You probably looked suspicious to him. He is doing his job.

You see. This the problem. Here officially formally and publicly agree that People can be judged suspicious because of their Looks!

From the way you talk, I think she would refuse. Another interesting observation. Yes, in "dictatorships" defense is based on Accepting the Accusation and Apologizing. There is no room for actually defending yourself. That upsets the court establishment.

As I am not a Japanese, I will be happy to see Julie Hamp leave here and return to a deserving society. I am only upset if my friends ask me about this and I have to say: well, it is Asia, but still quite exotic sometimes!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

nedinjapan

When I was in USA, my friends were stopped by the police or when walking, the police car slowed down along with my friend as if my friends were suspicous.

So it is OK for foreigners in US but not OK for Americans in Japan?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Ned - I think that the communication discrepancy is coming down to the difference between 'the way things are' and 'the way things should be'.

The way things should be - an addict who smuggles drugs for personal use into the country should not be subjected to imprisonment, but rather receive treatment for addiction (before maybe being deported for smuggling the drugs).

The way things are - an addict who smuggles drugs for personal use into the country is thrown in jail, interrogated, and forced to go through withdrawal while being imprisoned.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Discounting that the cop was just checking you out (an entirely separate topic), you can agree that racial profiling is horrible anywhere. Driving while African-American or biking while Chinese in Japan--neither should draw a cop's attention unless they are observed committing a crime.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Tinawatanabe

I promise you the number of illegal intrusions against Julie Hamp's life has been much higher than her illegal act of getting painkillers. They are now treating her like a natural born criminal who brought shame to her employer Toyota! No part of her personal life is immune from questioning and if she does not want to tell them about her very personal information, she will be further accused of withholding information! If you like your country, you need to start trying to change that. You deserve your almost democratic constitution to US occupation. Not respecting Julie Hamp's rights will end up in a lack of respect to Japanese citizens. That is Karma.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

If this exec is not smart enough to let lackeys get these drugs in to the country the she isn't high enough on the corruption ladder :P

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The way things are - an addict who smuggles drugs for personal use into the country is thrown in jail, interrogated, and forced to go through withdrawal while being imprisoned.

You can request a doctor and if you are showing signs of withdrawal the police will call a doctor.

So far the only events for Julie Hamp is being caught with banned prescription drugs, arrested and detained in a police detention center and at the end the public prosecutor will have to decide whether to proceed or not.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I promise you the number of illegal intrusions against Julie Hamp's life has been much higher than her illegal act of getting painkillers.

I'm sure she retains several competent lawyers, and they are protecting her right.

They are now treating her like a natural born criminal who brought shame to her employer Toyota!

I don't think the police care about Toyota's shame.

No part of her personal life is immune from questioning and if she does not want to tell them about her very personal information, she will be further accused of withholding information!

No. The suspects are informed that they have the right to remain silent and anything they say may be used as evidence.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

@nedinjapan

Here we are talking about a successful business woman having recently travelled to Japan for her job,

She hadn't just travelled hers, she was setting up a household as she was going to be living and working here.

who has difficulty communicating her health issues to Japanese doctors,

We are not talking about a poor, uneducated, undocumented immigrant with no access to resources or health insurance. Hamp was a highly paid high executive in a major corporation. She would certainly have had access to company translators and interpreters. If they couldn't help her, or she didn't want their help with personal matters, she could have arranged for someone through the concierge at her expensive hotel for instance. She also would have had health insurance coverage through her employer or could afford to go to one of the hospitals or clinics in Tokyo that cater to wealthy expats with English speaking doctors. She certainly could have afforded to pay for any services necessary to communicate her "needs."

having asked her FATHER to get her a strong pain medication (that is available by prescription)

Yes, this is a medication available by prescription, to those who actually HAVE a prescription.

I am not buying another Toyota from the managers who sold her out to the police ...

Toyota did not sell her out. She was caught by a random search of incoming parcels that had nothing whatsoever to do with Toyota.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I do not know why so many people jump to the defense of Julie Hamp. She broke the law by importing a drug that is available by prescription in Japan. In the USA it is also only available by prescription because it is an opiate similar to morphine and has some very serious side effects; it is generally used only for very severe pain. It is also addictive. It was not her prescription; the pills were sent to her by her father and apparently an attempt was made to hide them.

Ignorance of the law is no excuse, and if she needed a painkiller I am sure she could have gone to a doctor in Japan. She was not fired; she resigned. To attempt to link this to "woman's rights" and alleging that there are "illegal intrusions into Julie Hamp's personal life" is beyond ludicrous.

Another poster said "A developed society holds its citizens innocent until proven otherwise." Well, since Hamp admitted she broke the law, doesn't that pretty much prove that she is not innocent? Let this be a lesson to all foreigners living in Japan-do not attempt to smuggle your drugs by mail

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Idiot

0 ( +1 / -1 )

to A Realist I wish you knew the realities of police work in Japan. I had a friend who was interrogated for driving at 90 km/h in a wide national road that most drivers drive at 80 to 100 all day long but has one of those mouse traps! He had to go for the routine interrogation. They asked him questions about his personal life such as his ex-wife and having been told he could be silent in fact they would insist to get an answer anytime he showed reluctance to answer, such as to mention his ex-wife's name that had no relation to the incident. My friend being a psychologist realized they were intimidating questions similar to what is by gangs harassing a man to get full obedience. You can guess what is happening to Julie Hamp. If we still have gangs on the streets, if we have bully problems at school and work, if ... it is because of this "Intimidation Culture" that that "Any accused is guilty till he/she can prove innocence". Legally speaking, Julie Hamp could challenge all accusations against her in this case but the first recommendation a Japanese lawyer would provide her is that she must accept guilt, apologize, resign to save Toyota from embarrassment, and Tolerate the torturous treatment.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@nedinjapan

If Hamp actually was coerced into a false confession then perhaps when she is eventually released and returns to the USA she will write a blog or a book and tell us all about it. With her PR skills it should be easy. I think she is probably guilty but I would be interested in hearing her side of the story someday.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You can hear her side of the story at the court if indicted.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@nedinjapan and the rest of hamp backers:

1) while police tactics in Japan may be heavy handed, it still does not change the fact that he broke the low. He got caught, tough luck.

Same with Julie Hamp. She broke the law and got caught. Stupid law? Doesn't deserve jail time? Yes, I would agree, but that does not mean she shouldn't have to face the consequences.

Furthermore, she didn't have a US prescription for the drugs; even if she were in America, she still would be arrested. Why do you insist on defending her?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

OK, let me suggest a Test: Let's assume Julie Hamp is guilty of Smuggling Drugs into Japan. Thus she got drugs from her accomplice in the US who Smuggled the drugs by trying to hide them into a fake necklace box. So he is at least as guilty, and probably guiltier than her. Why not ask the US to extradite him on Drug Smuggling charges? ........ Now you see how ridiculous this sounds. Any court in the US can have a laugh about this: oh, crazy Japanese hahaha. Even here they know very well how this sounds because in fact they know this is no crime. Now let me tell you how a Developed country would deal with this issue: Take the painkillers. Send a letter you need to prove with a doctor's letter and prescription that you medically need this, and if not, you must pay a fine of 20,000 yen. This would be the cost of checking the box, processing the letter and paperwork. Period.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

umm read my name. I use to take oxycodon and hydrocodon its a pain relief narcotic prescribed by doctors in the USA and big pharama created a different kind of heroin to relieve chronic pain but not cause respiratory failure at a given dose. So do not get all excited about this.

Every pharmaceutical drug has the goods and bads side effects and most drugs engineer by BIG Pharam especially psychiatric psychotropic meds are more addictive than heroin and thats how they get rich. Big phara is called a Lega Drug Dealer of the FDA.

For those who know nothing about the pharmaceutical industry should not be tripping because who created HEORIN?? The USA Pharmaceutical company called BAYER! so take a chill pill and relax.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

How did her father get a Rx for more than 50 pills? Most one can get at one time is 10.

Even in the States, no doctor would prescribe 50 tablets at once.

Neither of these comments (and actually a whole bunch of others) is remotely correct. A family member received a prescription for Oxycodone following surgery in 2014 of 70 tablets (of which she only needed about 25 and the rest were returned to the pharmacy for disposal.)

Oxycondone is one of THE most-abused prescription drugs out there--that's why there are extremely strict rules in place on its dispensing to users (I know that my medical provider only allows pickup of oxycondone prescriptions in person at a pharmacy).

Well then, given that this drug is often prescribed as a second-line painkiller after morphine for people post-surgery who can barely move let alone pop out to the pharmacy to pick up their prescription your medical provider is either a moron, or acting in a case by case scenario for people with chronic vs acute pain.

I also can't believe the number of people defending this woman. Its really very simple - if you have chronic knee pain, you take oxycodone for it and your doctor has prescribed it to you for that purpose, you bring it in to Japan with a clearly labeled bottle, a prescription and a letter from your doctor. Although honestly anyone needing something as strong as oxycodone for a chronic knee problem is going to be obviously limping and in pain to start with. But she didn't do this, did she? She arranged for it to be sent to her (or sent it herself) hidden inside a package labeled as toy necklaces. Who does that if what they are doing is all above board and they have nothing to hide?! I'll answer - someone who DOESNT have a prescription, DOESNT have medical permission to take them, and DOESNT want anyone else to know about it. She obviously doesnt have a prescription, otherwise she would have produced it by now and most of all this would have gone away.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

She's clearly a drug addict. She clearly needs medical help. Let her go, and go into hospital, forcibly if necessary.

Sometimes you have to be cruel to be kind. But prison or any kind of judicial treatment is ridiculous....

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The Public Prosecutor has decided not to charge her. Within days she'll be back in the States.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Sorry but not buying one bit of her story. She was a top exec is one of the richest companies in the world. I am not buying that she is that stupid to have not known what she was dong is illegal. She definitely knew what she was doing, and only sorry that she got caught doing it.

Agree.

That she did not intend to break the law is crap. She should have known that oxycodyne is illegal in Japan, otherwise why she hid it?, and even if she didn't know that it is illegal, it was not allowed to send it by mail, so she hid them to bypass a regulation.

3 or 4 pills would have been an "honest mistake", 57 pills hidden in several boxes with different labels is not.

She needed those pills and she asked her father to send them to her, it is ridiculous that her father was only the one in the wrong and she innocent.

"How can they prove she Planned or Ordered the mailing of the medicine?"

They don't need to, They ask her directly about the pills, she said they were for her.

From the start, she was shown as Guilty for "having prescription medicine mailed to her"? She did not mail, and she had not received the mail and not used the medicine yet! The only law broken, is the law of sending Prescription medicine by postal mail! This is the legal fact!

I'm guessing you are having problems with the phrase and its interpretation. "To have something done", like this case "having prescription medicine mailed to her", means that she intended the action directly and it was her idea. Even though she is not making it herself, for example, when you said "Have the house painted", means that you have another person who does a service for you, but you are the owner of the idea/action.

I had a friend who was interrogated for driving at 90 km/h in a wide national road that most drivers drive at 80 to 100 all day long but has one of those mouse traps!

It seems this one is universal, as in one of classes at the university, the professor (a judge) told us a case where a person was ticketed for going against traffic in a short driveway, her defense? "but everybody does it", and the judge said, "just because everybody does it it doesn't mean it is right (or in this case, "legal")

.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

One package was intercepted. How many others were sent and not intercepted?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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