crime

Man sentenced to death for killing 19 disabled people at care facility

61 Comments
By Kiyoshi Takenaka

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© Thomson Reuters 2020.

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61 Comments
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That photo. A crowd gathered for a non-essential reason, no social distancing being practiced. Bloody hell.

18 ( +24 / -6 )

This part was included by the BBC in its report on this sentence and seems relevant to help explain this monster’s views:

The attack has also raised the issue of how disabled people are treated in Japan.

*The identities of most of those killed have not been revealed by their families, reportedly *because they do not want to reveal they had a disabled relative.

23 ( +28 / -5 )

I am not in favour of the death penalty, but in this case I think its a suitable punishment.

3 ( +14 / -11 )

Fantastic! The only bad thing about Japans death penalty is how long it takes. But still, that's a great result.

2 ( +16 / -14 )

serves him right

7 ( +13 / -6 )

Better than 20 years ago. I know several families who I visit have severe disabled children which they don't hide away even when I visit but too many families try to hide their disabled from their communities and no one talks about them.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Support or opposition to the death penalty is never selective. Yes or no but no gray areas.

15 ( +16 / -1 )

Mary Jane used by the defense as the reason for his mental state. Gimme a break. But back to the topic, good for this guy, the sentences is just, absolutely no remorse on his part.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

He will be on so-called death row for the next 10-15 years just like Asahara was, and all at us taxpayers expense .

Hang him now !

1 ( +13 / -12 )

Killing him is no doubt what he wants.

He has had his voice heard, his notoriety has caused outrage, and by dying he probably achieves his own twisted favoured version of ultimate infamy.

Don't give him what he wants.

At the age of 30 a sentence until death - 30, 40, 50, 60 + years - would be more appropriate for him to reflect on his failed cause.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

Good verdict!

I just wish he had used the shame of most of the families in hiding their disabled relatives names as part of his defence. Showing that even the relative don’t really accept that the disabled in Japan have the same rights as others.

Lets hope Japan can learn to not hide in out the way facilities and be ashamed of their less than perfect citizens.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Excellent news, and the only possible sentence. This animal has shown no remorse and has lost his right to live in any society.

Rest in Peace to the poor innocent victims.

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

He got what he actually was asking for in the very beginning. How long will he be waiting since he wont be appealing.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I'm generally against the death penalty, but it's hard to disagree with this outcome.

-1 ( +9 / -10 )

Like all other media news, they need to present a supplemental information as well.

Not just like a man who thought he needed to kill disables for the society was sentenced to death..

We also need to know like his life, skill, or childhood, chronological order.

He has a drawing skill maybe because his mother, Mari Uemastu , was a cartoonist drawing scary comic books.

See the president Trump that he drew.

https://matome.naver.jp/odai/2152630726192050801

His mom and dad were in a bad relation and his dad, a teacher, left home.

So much to think about.

What made him that way?

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Chip Star, “*The identities of most of those killed have not been revealed by their families, reportedly *because they do not want to reveal they had a disabled relative.”

Reportedly? Did they interview all the families? Were they queried as to their individual and specific reasons for not wanting to reveal such information? How much of this is speculation? If such detailed information is available I’d be interested in reading it. Let us know if you have a link, please.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Sooner the sentence is carried out the better ...monster.

Japanese society needs to do a serious reflection on itself and how it looks / treats those with disabilities. May this horrible tragedy be a catalyst for some meaningful change.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Those that support the death penalty must be looking for retribution because it does not serve as a deterrent. If it did serve as a deterrent, there wouldn’t be any crimes in places like China and North Korea.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Educator: My apologies for not having provided the link.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Well, I suppose creeps like this are the reason some countries have the death penalty. However, this loon is not really a violent murderer. He is a delusional nutcase who believes he was doing society a favor.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

"Grandpappy told my pappy, ' back in my day, son, a man had to answer for the wicked that he done.'. Get all the rope in Texas find a tall oak tree, round up all the bad boys, hang them high in the street, for all the people to see."

........... Willie Nelson.

Amen.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Hopefully, the families will have some kind of peace now.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

It’s disturbing how many people are cheering another killing that will happen.

8 ( +17 / -9 )

Good news !!..

0 ( +7 / -7 )

It’s disturbing how many people are cheering another killing that will happen

The World is currently in an absolute uproar and yet you are worried about this guy? Please list the benefits of keeping this guy alive instead of focusing how other people feel.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Good result. this is what the death penalty is for. Should be used for pedophiles also.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

Justice should be swift. The decision has been made. There is no reason at all to keep him hanging around. Waste of taxpayer money apart from anything else. What's the betting that, the next time he comes around, he will be disabled!

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Great news. Good example for every mean hearted people.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Instead of the death penalty and have taxpayers pay for his three squares and a cot for years, make him take care of paperwork from people with disabled relatives. One day, he may see the light. All of us are on earth for a short time, no matter whether we are 100% or 10%.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

The hanging will be the easy part for him. Wait 'till he meets his maker. I wouldn't like to be in his shoes then.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Uematsu is an evil man and the verdict will undoubtedly bring closure to many. But also, "family shame" over disabled people must be addressed in Japan. There's nothing no be ashamed of.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The World is currently in an absolute uproar and yet you are worried about this guy?

No, and this is not a logical inference from my post.

Please list the benefits of keeping this guy alive instead of focusing how other people feel.

The only benefit is it is not another killing.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

I have been opposed to capital punishment for 60 years and the majority of countries no longer support. Nothing has changed my views.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

He is sick. Sick people need to be studied to help understand and prevent similar sickness in the future.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

It’s disturbing how many people are cheering another killing that will happen.

I have sympathy for stray dogs and cats that get put down for nothing but roaming the streets ...this guy is pure evil and deserves the rope. Would you be so forgiving if he murdered your family member?

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Patrick Kimura-Macke:

He is sick. Sick people need to be studied to help understand and prevent similar sickness in the future.

He is not sick. He did it rationally and willingly. He simply has a different opinion in dealing with the disabled. It does not appear that many people agree with his opinion, but I am not confident. Sometimes millions of people willingly follow a disgusting idea in dealing with a specific group of human being.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

It’s disturbing how many people are cheering another killing that will happen.

Very.

You have to wonder what drives people to entertain fantasies about killing people. And, for some, on a daily basis.

It's clear that the killer is disturbed and should be put away for life.

But why continue the barbarism of killing people who don't fit into society?

1 ( +5 / -4 )

What do China, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam, Iraq, Pakistan, Iran, Egypt, Somalia, the US, and Japan all have in common?

In 2018 all these countries executed more than 10 people.

Pretty exalted company for Japan and the US. Capital punishment is a barbaric anachronism which has no place in modern civilized countries.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

 Capital punishment is a barbaric anachronism which has no place in modern civilized countries.

Indeed. It always amazes me when certain types admonish other peoples in the world for their "stone age" methods, and yet they themselves, are often found howling for vengeance and retribution like something out of a religious text.

The killer acted out a brutal fantasy and had zero regard for his victims. Of course such a hideous massacre of innocents is going to cause outrage and grief. But I would question those who want to enact (or have the state carry out) an equally brutal fantasy under the guise of "justice" onto the perpetrator.

These murders say a lot about Japanese society and those of us who call it home. It's worth more than a knee jerk reaction to such an atrocity, it's worth considering what causes such dark moments and how they can be prevented from happening again.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Mat he rot in hell.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

T H's reasoning is irrefutable. To acquaint oneself with the history of state-sponsored executions around the world in all their barbaric detail would make any reasonable human being's stomach turn. Merely to read of the cruelties perpetrated by organized killing is a profoundly distressing experience and makes one ashamed to be a member of the same species.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Funny how people easily fall into his own hate world by calling him "sick". He's sane, he's pure evil, nothing else. As for the death sentence itself, I respect Japan's legal system.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

If it did serve as a deterrent, there wouldn’t be any crimes in places like China and North Korea.

You may have to change up on your examples there. China has one of the lowest homicide rates in the World and North Korean crime is not made public.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It's interesting how some people consider the death penalty as closure for the families of the victims. This means, the death penalty is nothing but a government sanctioned revenge killing. Death is a release from punishment. The murderer's suffering ends on his death, but the suffering of victims will last the rest of their lives. Being locked in a small cell for the rest of their lives with no civil liberties is a punishment.

One of my cousins was killed by a drunk driver. The driver was sentenced to 20 years in prison. I'm glad he spent the majority of the rest of his life in prison.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

had diminished capacity at the time of the incident due to marijuana use. 

good riddance! You’d think AT LEAST a highly educated lawyer wouldn’t be so sheltered!!!!!! Come on people, do some research!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

We used to exile people back in the day.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Fantastic! The only bad thing about Japans death penalty is how long it takes. 

The law states that the death penalty will be carried out after six months if there are no appeals. The reason death penalties take so long is because all appeals must undergo due process. However, since this guy has claimed that he will not make any appeals, the sentence should be fairly soon.

In an interview after the verdict, “I’ll admit, I am quite tired of this whole ordeal. I don’t blame the judges. They are just doing their job as the law requires. I have no intention to make any appeals. But having “death row inmate” on my resume, that’s pretty crazy, isn’t it?”

“I would also like to say that marijuana is necessary for world peace. When you are unable to communicate your thoughts, you are as good as dead.”

https://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20200317-00000002-kana-soci

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I have sympathy for stray dogs and cats that get put down for nothing but roaming the streets ...this guy is pure evil and deserves the rope.

Uh, okay.

Would you be so forgiving if he murdered your family member?

Me being forgiving is not a logical inference from my post.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

You may have to change up on your examples there. China has one of the lowest homicide rates in the World and North Korean crime is not made public.

Good thing I said crime and not murder, or you may have a valid point. Not to mention we can’t trust the stats from China.

We do know, however, that crime still exists in China and North Korea despite the death penalty being doled out quite excessively in both countries.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Satoshi Uematsu stood on the shoulders of monsters. The Holocaust got started with the Nazi state murdering so-called "useless eaters:" namely the physically and mentally handicapped. The Nazis were influenced by the eugenics movement and by the works of Thomas Malthus. Malthus who hated helping poor people because they would only increase the "surplus population." This idea is directly responsible for Ireland's so-called potato famine (1848-50). The only difference between Hitler and Uematsu is that the latter did it on his own initiative.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

jeancolmarToday 09:03 am JST

Satoshi Uematsu stood on the shoulders of monsters. The Holocaust got started with the Nazi state murdering so-called "useless eaters:" namely the physically and mentally handicapped. The Nazis were influenced by the eugenics movement and by the works of Thomas Malthus. Malthus who hated helping poor people because they would only increase the "surplus population." This idea is directly responsible for Ireland's so-called potato famine (1848-50). The only difference between Hitler and Uematsu is that the latter did it on his own initiative.

Various media are reporting that Uematsu claimed to have been influenced by the Nazis:

"Uematsu, 30, told medical staff and officials that he was influenced by the ideas of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, whose killings of disabled people were seen as intended to improve the perceived master race."

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/satoshi-uematsu-mass-killing-19-disabled-people-japan-sentenced-to-hang-today-2020-03-16/

Japanese media reported on it in 2016:

""The ideas of Hitler came to me two weeks ago," he was quoted as saying. The Nazi government implemented a forced euthanasia program for the congenitally disabled, referred to by the Third Reich as "useless eaters" and "life unworthy of life."

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20160729/p2a/00m/0na/001000c

This aspect of Uematsu's crimes seems to have been erased from all the accounts of his recent trial that I've read. I wonder if there's any particular reason for this.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Would you be so forgiving if he murdered your family member?

Me being forgiving is not a logical inference from my post.

Fair enough , I,m happy to admit that some of my personal choices and opinions are formed by emotion rather than logical reasoning. This being one of them. Agree to disagree.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I can understand the desire for justice, but the death penalty should be abolished. There's no evidence that it does anything to deter violent crime, and there is ample evidence that innocent people have been convicted and executed, and that this will continue until the death penalty is abolished. Furthermore, the argument that it is generally wrong but acceptable in some cases is unsound.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If we go by the rational that the death penalty should be abolished because it is not a deterrent then we probably should abolish all punishments for all crimes.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

ianToday 01:37 pm JST

If we go by the rational that the death penalty should be abolished because it is not a deterrent then we probably should abolish all punishments for all crimes.

Could you elaborate on that a little please. You know, just to add some clarity to the discussion.

It's a little over my head as it is.

If we focus just on the topic at hand - the death penalty is a deterrent - I'd surely say no. In fact as recent as today the criminal Uematsu has said the decision was as he expected (wanted) and he will not appeal even if his lawyers do.

One could speculate - with a good dash of rationality - that he committed such a large scale horrendous atrocity and turned himself directly in, knowing full well he will die thanks to the death penalty.

Some deterrent.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It means the death penalty is not a deterrent, as are all the penalties for other crimes.

They do not deter because normally, the people who commit crimes do not expect to be caught

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

So it's not appropriate to justify abolishing it on the ground of not being a deterrent.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

So it's not appropriate to justify abolishing it on the ground of not being a deterrent.

Indeed. It would be like justifying it on the grounds that it is a deterrent.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

it's not appropriate to justify abolishing it on the ground of not being a deterrent.

The one compelling reason for abolishing the death penalty, or for not having it in the first place, is that it turns the ordinary citizen into a cold-bloodied killer. It's done in our name, using our tax money. It's barbaric.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The late and great Indian leader, Mahatma Gandhi, once said, “An eye for an eye will make the whole world blind.” The Death Penalty Should be abolished because it constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. The Death Penalty Should be abolished because there is no evidence it will reduce crime rates. The Death Penalty Prevents Exoneration. Failing to Abolish the Death Penalty is a waste of money. The Death Penalty has a disparate impact on minorities. The Death Penalty Causes Socio-Economic Discrimination. The Death Penalty is State Sanctioned Revenge. The Death Penalty is State Sanctioned Revenge.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

So it's not appropriate to justify abolishing it on the ground of not being a deterrent.

Indeed. It would be like justifying it on the grounds that it is a deterrent

Precisely.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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