crime

Men charged in Ghosn escape plot ask U.S. State Department to halt extradition

31 Comments
By David Shepardson and Nate Raymond

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© Thomson Reuters 2021.

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

31 Comments
Login to comment

I how the State Department does hat the extradition given no defendants in Japanese courts have a fair shot at proving their innocence.

-14 ( +7 / -21 )

*hope

-13 ( +6 / -19 )

if extradited, they faced the prospect of relentless interrogations and torture.*

Prospect? More like certainty

-2 ( +16 / -18 )

The State Department will not halt the extradition to Japan. If it does, the US will be have reneged on the Japan-US Extradition treaty. The US will lose all moral authority. Canada, which is in the process of extraditing Meng to US, will fine the US action to be outrageous, and find an excuse not to send Meng to US. The US knows this and therefore, it has no choice but to send the Taylors to Japan.

7 ( +21 / -14 )

Himari: That is quite the theory you have.

-2 ( +12 / -14 )

The letter suggested the charges "are explained by the government of Japan’s desire to save face, or at least to be perceived to be doing something to address their embarrassment." 

exactly. and to extract revenge.

-4 ( +14 / -18 )

Why should these people be above the law? They were guests in this country like other expats, and they abused the privilege by ruthlessly and relentlessly complaining their host on JT - I mean by breaking the law. Sorry forgot who I was thinking about for a moment there.

12 ( +21 / -9 )

What if the situation were reversed? Would Japan extradite them to the US?

Of course. The US would go ballistic if they didn't.

13 ( +18 / -5 )

HimariYamada

Japan and the US do not have an extradition treaty.

I can’t blame these guys for trying everything to avoid extradition. They’ll be thrown in solitary confinement in a Japanese jail indefinitely with no visitors, internet or newspapers and subjected to daily interrogations for hours on end with the aim of forcing a confession - just like Ghosn was.

-6 ( +15 / -21 )

Japan and the US do not have an extradition treaty.

They most certainly do.

https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/volume%201203/volume-1203-I-19228-English.pdf

18 ( +20 / -2 )

What if the situation were reversed? Would Japan extradite them to the US?

Of course. The US would go ballistic if they didn't.

*Japanese nationals who have been criminally charged by DOJ generally must choose between voluntarily submitting to American jurisdiction or remaining in Japan as a “fugitive” while avoiding international travel. *As of July 2016, there were an estimated 24 Japanese citizens living in Japan who had been indicted in the United States between 1990 and June 2016 on alleged “cartel” offenses.17

https://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=7d47070e-c949-4ddd-b0e4-546a569b373f

-8 ( +5 / -13 )

So many posters here are completely ignorant of the law but insist they know what’s going on.

-11 ( +6 / -17 )

I how the State Department does hat the extradition given no defendants in Japanese courts have a fair shot at proving their innocence.

Defendants should not

have to prove their innocence. They should be presumed innocent until proven guilty.

1 ( +12 / -11 )

A thorough reading shows that there has only been one instance when an extradition demand from the US was turned down by Japan.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Extraditions have been refused before for various reasons, but it isn't going to happen this time. The State Department has already approved the extradition, and the courts have already reviewed and approved it as well. There's no change in the circumstances, no change in the fact solution, nothing to substantiate a change of direction at this point.

At this point, their struggling against the inevitable probably does nothing except to worsen their position. They've never really denied that they did it, and their entire defence is based on it being legal for them to do it (even though they know is neither legal nor moral in their homeland). Since it is hard to believe whoever will become their judge in Japan doesn't watch TV or read the papers, the result of these futile appeals is likely to be to worsen his impression of them and dent whatever last minute claim to being repentant they might have been able to offer.

And, really, a little suggestion to the usual suspects: If you want to help those two even a little bit, you might want to try another strategy other than shooting all those usual insults. It's just vaguely possible the Judge will swim past here, and if he does, I don't see how those usual comments will cause anything other than a quiet rage in him, which might just bleed through into the sentence. He's only human. Humans get harsher when their insititution has just been insulted.

9 ( +16 / -7 )

Why should these people be above the law? They were guests in this country like other expats, and they abused the privilege by ruthlessly and relentlessly complaining their host on JT - I mean by breaking the law. Sorry forgot who I was thinking about for a moment there.

Absolutly correct. Just one little problem. Something has gone very wrong with the law in Japan. (The UN seem to think so too). One moral question I would ask is "Is it wrong to rescue hostages?".

-8 ( +8 / -16 )

Assuming the extradition goes through, the next development to look for is whether the Taylors are hit with additional charges when they arrive in Japan. The list could be extensive (filing a false customs declaration, providing false information to immigration officials, knowingly supplying an aircraft for criminal activity, and so on). Many of these possible charges carry maximum sentences which are either higher or as high as the 2 year max sentence of the charge they're being extradited on.

14 ( +16 / -2 )

Will the Turkish witnesses be extradited? Or Lebanese officials?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

" if extradited, they faced the prospect of relentless interrogations and torture."

If the shoe was on the other side, what would have happened?

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Like I said the SCOTUS wouldn't give them the time of day, and they didn't.

If what they did is "not a crime" in Japan then they will have no difficulty at all in being found innocent in the Japanese Court. These guys are tough, they can handle being treated the way others are. They are not like Ghosn. The Taylors may get an extension until they are vaccinated. But the writing is on the wall. Good thing they got paid enough to handle all these legal bills.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

The Taylors should allow the extradition to Japan get a very good Japanese attorney and when the judge ask how they plead all they have to say was "WE WHERE DRUNK". Case dismissed!!!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

"WE WHERE DRUNK". Case dismissed!!!

Yeah! What can go wrong?!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Or Lebanese officials?

Lebanon does not have an extradition treaty with Japan.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Keep barking criminals, Japan justice awaits.. Waaahahahahaaaaa !!..

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

They went for hight risk hight return, Unfortunately with all legal expenses involved the risk over weight return.. absolutely No sympathy!

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Whatever the facts, the US is being far more generous than Japan would be if the situation were reversed. Japan protects its own, extradition request or not. I don't see why the US should be so cooperative over a non-violent crime - except for purely political reasons.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Maybe the Taylor’s should have run their plan by the State Dept. before carrying it out...just to give them a heads up.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Japan's Human rights Ambassador Ueda 2013

-"Certainly Japan is not in the middle ages.... DON'T LAUGH!"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkoQjIBA_3U

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

They are weighing imprisonment and perceived torture in Japan versus living in exile in Lebanon or some remote area. Imminent prison break.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Please keep them in America.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

HimariYamada

...The US will lose all moral authority

Ha ha ha!

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites