crime

Death penalty sought for man over 2019 Kyoto Animation arson-murders

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Yep, 100% he needs to go

5 ( +8 / -3 )

He brought a terrifying finality to 36 innocent victims, and finality to their family's happiness, for what ??

In the prosecutor's words, the defendant's "degree of disregard for life is profound", his motive "completely irrational", and his behaviour "utterly selfish", demonstrate that in reality, he has brought about his own finality.

There is not a single valid or rational reason available as to why he should escape the ultimate penalty.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Rupert Spira

Today 07:38 pm JST

AlongfortherideToday 06:47 pm JST

> Yep, 100% he needs to go

> If you had the same circumstances in life. The same background and series of events leading up to what he did, you would have done the same thing.

> Think about that for a little longer than you normally would

Every person reacts different in situations.

36 lifes are gone and you don't think does family want him to have a life with food from tax payers?

He had a choice and he choice the wrong thing.

Sorry but I'm for death penalty in this case

10 ( +13 / -3 )

Burning alive 36 innocent souls. Almost impossible to comprehend the evil behind it.

This animal - when he hopefully hangs - will be getting off incredibly lightly. No tears will be shed for him - just his victims.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Reason 1 - it is immoral, barbaric and illegal to kill another human being.

Wrong, wrong and legally completely wrong.

The worst, most heinous crimes deserve the ultimate punishment.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

I'm not a millionaire but I'm willing to bet a million dollars that he'll get the death penalty.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

The death penalty is not right; it is wrong on so many levels.

If I were to take a life, I would prefer to end the lives of as many people as possible to ensure a quicker resolution.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

If the judge does hand down the death penalty (which will probably happen by Japan's rubber stamping judges), just get on with it and do it. Japan's legal system is so sadistic and cruel, he will probably spend decades on death row.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

demanded the death penalty *for* ( whats his name again ? the "mass murderer" ) who sent Kyoto Animation Co. up in flames trapping and burning 36 people alive!

Stop kid gloving this guy. BE SERIOUS.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I'm against the death penalty on principal (too many innocents executed and the blood is on society's hands) but give me a gun and I could take this guy out behind the barn and blow his brains out. That studio put out some of the finest anime shows ever and those people died horrible deaths. Put the onus on me alone and I could do it. And I wouldn't lose a minute's sleep.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

If you had the same circumstances in life. The same background and series of events leading up to what he did, you would have done the same thing.

What circumstances would they be? I'd like to think I (and most people) wouldn't burn to death 36 people because I suspected the animation studio they were working for lifted a scene from one of my rejected novels.

I would prefer to end the lives of as many people as possible to ensure a quicker resolution

That kind of sounds like what Mr. Aoba did.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Deserves death penalty..

Deserves Japanese gallows..

2 ( +5 / -3 )

There's no reason to keep this guy alive. In this case a death sentence is correct.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

That's a very wise decision. People in the US have been put to death for less.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

For once, I will agree with the Japan Today “hang ‘‘em high” brigade who demand the death penalty for all sorts of crimes

This guy deserves to die, without a doubt.

Sick, twisted piece of dirt that he is.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Japan is as backwards as Texas with respect to the death penalty.

Besides, in this case, life in prison would be the harsher sentence.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

He went and bought the gasoline for the attack, that proves intent and premeditation, if he was medically incompetent and incapable of thinking, surely he would not have done this tragic event. I do not agree with the death penalty, but it exists.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

No, there is no free-will - it's an illusion. Everything we do is the result of everything that happened before it, our environment, our culture, our family and our genes. Neurologists and other societies can find no central area of the brain that controls.

Very funny, you still live in the dark age?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Rupert SpiraToday 06:27 am JST

No, there is no free-will - it's an illusion. Everything we do is the result of everything that happened before it, our environment, our culture, our family and our genes. Neurologists and other societies can find no central area of the brain that controls.

If we advance that path to its logical conclusion, we'd be back to heavy punishments and maybe even bring back the "cruel" punishments. If there's no free will at all, then there's no longer a need to distinguish between cases when it exists and when it doesn't. In that case, no one is really guilty, but because we still need to reduce crime and all society can do is drive-up the "counter-pressure" to maximize the chance of people, even those in the worst objective circumstances, will not end up choosing crime as a result of "environment, culture, family and genes".

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Rupert, do heinous crimes like this not make you angry?

They certainly make me (and, I would imagine most normal people) angry.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Rupert SpiraToday 04:44 pm JST

Punishment is not a deterrent to crime in most cases. This has been well-established for decades.

First, that means sometimes it is. Second, if we can't count on deterrence, this STILL puts the weight on increasing punishments - we can now only incapacitate known malefactors, either by lengthy prison sentences, or the more economic course of capital punishments. They might not be guilty as they will in a system that assumes free will, and in a system that assumes they don't they are nothing but a product, but a malefactor they still are. However they got rotten, if they can't be fixed, they must be neutralized.

The point is, you might think your arguments call for lighter punishments, but I'd argue they conclude in advocating for the inverse.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Rupert SpiraToday 05:40 pm JST

What would I have to feel angry about?

Well, for one, it is pretty thankless job being an animator or a struggling artist. And then they go and get murdered before they make it big.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Rupert SpiraToday 06:19 pm JST

What's to be angry about? That is sad.

I think we grew up in different cultures and environments.

For me, I have a soft spot for artists as they are just trying to make life livable for the rest of us. It's just like if somebody had shot up a room full of kids.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Rupert.

For what it’s worth, a tragic accident would make me sad.

A deliberate act of extreme and horrific violence, war crimes, violence against women and children - these things make me angry.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

And, a final point which probably explains things best to you.

I feel sad for the victims and their families while at the same time I feel real anger towards the perpetrator of this terrible crime.

I think it is very common to experience both emotions at the same time in cases like this.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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