crime

U.S. puts yakuza figures, companies on sanctions blacklist

28 Comments
By Yosjhikazu Tsuno

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© 2018 AFP

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28 Comments
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Japan how about doing the same....

23 ( +25 / -2 )

When the Japanese government finally gets around to outlawing membership to Yakuza organizations things MIGHT change. But since they are not illegal groups, and the government having little interest in pushing this issue, things wont change.

All the government wants, as it seems to me, is for the Yakuza to stay under the radar, and not have any of their activities spill over into the public eye, when they would have to take "official" action!

13 ( +13 / -0 )

The Treasury Departmemt levelling sanctions is a fairly good indication that something should be done domestically. Treasury doesn't bother with two-bit criminals.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

It’s good to see someone standing up to these ingrates. Come to think of it, it has been a few years since the Japanese cops have done a token raid on the Yamaguchi Gumi HQ. We must about due for another one soon.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Someone has too Japan's government obviously can not.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

@kobe. Maybe because there is a connection between ldp and yaks? Ever wondered who is trying to clean up Fukushima? ¥8000 a day?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

USA should sanction Japan for proven annual abduction of kids with foreign fathers

2 ( +5 / -3 )

"Why is the US doing this? Why doesn't the Japanese Government do this?"

The simple answer is the Japanese government and the Yakuza are quite heavily tied together.

If you look at any of English university published textbooks on organized crime in Japan, you will find that many former prominent politicians in the country came from Yakuza families throughout the 20th century. Yakuza members are not exactly what you see in the movies.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Nothing like this will ever happen in Japan, because the yakuza are too ingrained into Japanese society. In fact, some "retired" yakuza leaders have even gone on to hold the highest posts in the Japanese government.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Frozen assets aren't enough, but it is a start. Now we just need to catch them in a country willing to extridite them to the USA for trials and if found guilty, seize those assets like they do with any other criminal.

Sadly, the seizures are usually kept by the department doing the work, instead of going towards other public services.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

When the Japanese government finally gets around to outlawing membership to Yakuza.

Haven't you heard? The biggest yakuza are in Kasumigaseki.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Private citizens, unrelated to government policy are now getting "sanctioned", this is getting hilarious.

The policy these private citizens are running afoul of is the policy against criminal activity.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Goodlucktoyou, in Japan it is against the law to do business with the yakuza. In the case of Fukushima clearup, actually in other cases, too, there are yakuza-run subcontractors doing the work. If they sign a document for the contractor above them saying they are not yakuza, the contractor is legally covered.

"But the said they were not yakuza."

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why is the US doing this? Why doesn't the Japanese Government do this?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The US has a whole government industry of putting sanctions on all sorts of people/companies/organisations/countries.  And they actually change very little.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Japan how about doing the same....

And mess with the countries culture, me thinks not!

I wish the article hinted at some assets seized stateside or elsewhere to gauge if this is effective or just a warning for these yaks to not venture out of Japan!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

does this mean no more liver transplants in USA for known yakuza members? http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2009/11/did-yakuza-boss-pay-million-dollars-for.html

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Private citizens, unrelated to government policy are now getting "sanctioned", this is getting hilarious.

Who is not sanctioned these days?

Israelis, who are heavily involved in "sexual exploitation, weapons smuggling, and extortion". I guess the yakuza was competing against the Israelis, who have a stranglehold on US policy.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

On the one hand, you might think that the reason the government doesn't just shut these yakuza groups down is that they must have lots of very comprimizing information on politicians and bureaucrats. At the same time, you need a place to send unruly youths where they will be subject to severe discipline, and that is the yakuza groups.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It would seem that President Trump does more for the decent, honest, hardworking taxpayers of Japan, than Japans own government does.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Trump's admin is doing this because Abe asked for it, and thus keeps his hands clean.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Given the Trump family's connections to organized crime in the US and throughout the world, 

What you suggest is insulting for organized crime.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why this, now? The yakuza had their heyday in the late '80's and early '90's...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Given the Trump family's connections to organized crime in the US and throughout the world, it could be Mueller's uncovered Trump's links in Japan, too. Casinos?

-2 ( +8 / -10 )

Given the Trump family's connections to organized crime in the US and throughout the world

Fake news

-2 ( +10 / -12 )

The yakuza were closely connected to Abe's grandpa, but they also had (still have?) close ties with the CIA and FBI. I wonder whether the Trump admin is applying pressure on the yakuza to influence Japanese government policy, or perhaps decrease the yakuza's influence in China or North Korea.

I don't know why the Trump admin is doing this, but I doubt very much it's because of a concern for sexual exploitation, weapons smuggling, and extortion.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Get em, and please report their nationality.

I have a feeling that they will have roots from other countries

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Private citizens, unrelated to government policy are now getting "sanctioned", this is getting hilarious.

Who is not sanctioned these days?

-14 ( +1 / -15 )

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