crime

Verdict due Friday in MtGox bitcoin embezzlement case

17 Comments
By Miwa Suzuki

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© 2019 AFP

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17 Comments
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I sometimes misplace my glasses or keys. I never misplace my wallet - particularly, say, if it had 200,00 bitcoins in it. Kind of a reason one entrusts assets is that they will not be misplaced. Good luck with your defense.

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Moderator why did you delete my posts in this thread? should I report you again for deleting peoples freedom to express opinon?

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The guy is an idiot who doesn't understand coding or the law.

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@Reckless That part really stuck out for me too. It suggests that the burden of proof is on the wrong side.

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The amount stolen is close to a BIllion dollars in todays current valuation also.

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Mark is clearly guilty, he stold the money into a usb drive and went to a foreign bank account with it.

How can it be 'hacked' that large sum of money is very easy to track, if it was a 100 yen for example, it would not sound alarm bells..

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Was he "high flying"??  Also, I don't remember outrage at his treatment back in the day along the lines of the current furore over Ghosn.

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@Kenji Fujimori:

According to the infallible source of knowledge Wikipedia "McCaleb sold the site to French developer Mark Karpelès, who was living in Japan, in March 2011, saying 'to really make mtgox what it has the potential to be would require more time than I have right now. So I’ve decided to pass the torch to someone better able to take the site to the next level.'"

It was a jury rigged, half-arsed system in the first place to exchange fantasy based cards! Furthermore, looking at the picture of Karpeles, it was sold to a nitwit. I think it is very plausible he was simply duped and bitcoin owners NEVER should have entrusted such valuable items to him. Think of it this way, if you had had 20,000 dollars in cash a few years ago, would you have given it to Karpeles for "safe-keeping"?

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Reckless

Yep, though nothing can be proven that he stole the bit coins, but it is quite logical and obvious that he did, lawyers will blab 'hacked' and other catchphrases so he can be innocent. He also did not spend a day in jail for stealing close to a billion dollars, yet the judicial system here imprisons Carlos Ghosn who IS innocent.

Karpeles will be found 'innocent' cause the hacked bs will just be stated. Karpeles is playing the invisible man card, 'oh yeah it was hacked' while he laughs all the way to the bank..

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Kenji Fujimori, “He also did not spend a day in jail for stealing close to a billion dollars, yet the judicial system here imprisons Carlos Ghosn who IS innocent.”

Karpeles has not been found guilty yet. Did you not notice the article tells us the verdict will be in tomorrow? He did however already spend nearly a year in detention before getting out on bail (also in the article as well as being previously well-known), far longer than Ghosn.

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Hypothetically speaking let's say Japan finds him innocent, and he leaves and moves to Switzerland and pulls the USB drive out of his arse and now has access to billions of dollars in bitcoins. Would any jurisdiction be able to get him?

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@Kenji Fujimori: Mark is clearly guilty, he stold the money into a usb drive and went to a foreign bank account with it.

I would hesitate to agree with you. All the money in the world would not tempt me if I had to spend 10 years or even 10 weeks in a Japanese prison. This guy was clearly out of his league as a manager which is very common in startups.

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Reckless

How exactly is how out of his league? He is the first to start the crypto exchange, before local copycats. So he knows the ins and outs on how to steal and manipulate things. Crypto is just liquid at the end of the day, so it's way easier then say physical cash and because it's 'new' and hardly much regulations, he's found a niche to fudge things quite well..

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Yep, though nothing can be proven that he stole the bit coins, but it is quite logical and obvious that he did

Not necessarily. From the sounds of it, he was not a good business owner, and not very organized. Ever since the start he's come across to me more as incompetent more than nefarious.

lawyers will blab 'hacked' and other catchphrases so he can be innocent.

Or maybe he was hacked, and is innocent.

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"His defense counsel needs a high level of evidence to win an innocent verdict," he told AFP.

This quote is the problem! The defendant does not have to prove anything!!! He may have a really bad Friday or a really good Friday.

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I hope the verdict explains the reasoning of the judgement based on the laws. Too often in Japan, the reasons how the judgement was arrived at based on the law is not clearly understood.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Another test for J Justice. Pass or Fail? If he is innocent either way the truth will eventually come out, and miscarriages of justice revealed. Hope the court can not blunder this one too.

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