crime

Woman arrested for starving to death husband who had dementia

12 Comments

Police in Takatsuki, Osaka Prefecture, said Sunday they have arrested a 73-year-old woman on suspicion of killing her 76-year-old bedridden husband, who had dementia, by starving him to death.

Police quoted the woman, Nobuko Tamekiyo, as saying she was worn out from caring for her husband Yoshiaki, Fuji TV reported.

The woman visited the police station at around 7 a.m. Saturday and said her husband was dead at home. Police went to the scene and found Yoshiaki lying on his bed, already dead.

Police said Tamekiyo told them she was stressed out from looking after husband and had stopped feeding him from late April. She said she thought he would die but did not want to see him in bedridden and suffering from dementia anymore.

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12 Comments
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Another sad story, and even sadder still, is this is becoming more and more common, and will continue.

Where is all the Japanese care and hospitality for family? Right only when they are healthy, and it doesnt infringe on their precious work time!

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Yes she was stressed, yes it was a sad situation, but Yes, it is still murder. Her actions resulted in his death. But, she's old and no judge would ever put her in jail, so that makes it all okay.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

that's just so both terrible and sad.  The worst part for me is that I'm actually starting to get used to hearing these kinds of stories.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Yes, it is still murder. Her actions resulted in his death. But, she's old and no judge would ever put her in jail, so that makes it all okay.

Hopefully the prosecutors will see this case as a case of euthanasia, in Japanese it is called 安楽死

Anraku shi.

I worked in a hospital for many years, and saw countless numbers of patients who were in a vegetative state, no chance of recovery, legally brain dead, but because of the Japanese belief that while the heart is still beating the person is considered "alive", there is little that can be done to allow them to pass away peacefully.

I've dealt with having to watch both of my in-laws pass away and have had to make the decision, with my wife, to not allow any invasive actions to keep them alive.

You can not know the emotions and heartache that goes into making a decision like that, unless you have been there. Your comment sounds crass, but I will bet you any money it was the hardest decision that woman ever had to make in her life.

It is not easy to starve someone to death, particularly a loved one. She has been punished enough.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

"Where is all the Japanese care and hospitality for family? Right only when they are healthy, and it doesnt infringe on their precious work time!"

Based on your experience, wouldn't you say this is more of a problem in families w/out the means to do any better? I'm surrounded by pretty affluent Japanese who simply hire the needed caretakers--day homes, home helpers, and ultimately nursing homes when the time comes. But I admit my perspective is skewed. For those in/near poverty, I imagine social welfare or their small pensions is enough for rent or food but not much else. What most amazes me is when I see 75 year olds caring for their parents in their 90s. My mother in law is basically bedridden and it's challenging enough for us in our 40s, and we have money.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

such a sad ending. i don't blame her at all, imagine 73 years old to take care a dementia

person, it is impossible and hard work for her mentally and physically. japan really need to have more funding to care for the old age people. there are quite a bit of old people

sleep on the street too, it hurts.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

another good reason not to get married. if you end up on welfare at least the government will not starve you.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

I had a similar situation until recently, but we were able find an old people's home and she is surviving(and us) quite well and her dementia is not worsening much. Still find the tv remote in her shoe, or important staff files under her bed, but what I'm trying to say, is if we weren't lucky, (I experienced the effects of a primary carer) then it is the families responsibility. It is hard and interferes with your life. I don't agree with what she did, but I fully understand her stress.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I don't think she took any morbid joy in what she did.

Probably is ready to go with him, the way she feels.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

another good reason not to get married. if you end up on welfare at least the government will not starve you.

Sorry, I passed on this thread because of the games being played on it, but this is just damn ignorance talking.

How do you know THEY weren't on welfare? Marriage has nothing to do with what happened!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Cold!

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

From where I come from (U.S.), as measly as health care is here, some states offer social workers and nurses to come to your home several times a week to help take care of patients on the brink of dying. The intent here is, "better to have them cared for and die at home." It saves the state a lot of money, but the caregivers go through hell to watch over their loved ones fade away. It's like receiving hospice care at home. Many elders choose not to receive nutrition, and just die peacefully. If Japan had such system in place, the poor woman doesn't have to be charged for murder.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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