crime

Woman arrested over murder of common-law husband

10 Comments

Police in Yokohama said Sunday they have arrested a 61-year-old woman on suspicion of killing her 70-year-old common-law husband.

According to police, Iseko Niyama went to a police station at around 5:40 a.m. Saturday and said she might have killed her common-law husband, Fuji TV reported. Police went to her apartment and found the body of Hiroshi Norii, lying in a futon.

Police quoted Niyama as saying she had suffocated Norii, who had been bed-ridden for several months, by covering his nose and mouth with a blanket at around 3 a.m. Police said the victim was already dead when they arrived.

Niyama told police she had become worn out from looking after Norii.

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10 Comments
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how long until we read a very similar story?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Just change the names, dates and place and repeat the scenario over and over again. The regularity of family murder in Japan has me confused as to how Japan keeps plugging such a statistically low murder rate. My guess is, their statistics are fudged and only include violent murders and not family murders

Question: Is it really necessary to include ‘common-law’ in the description of her husband? This has popped up a few times recently. He is (was) her husband, right? Is there such a thing as an uncommon-law husband?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Sad story.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I understand that some people are just plain tired out from caring for people. But why does killing them seem to be the first answer that comes to mind? How about having them transported to the hospital for some reason, then go away or simply refuse to take them back. It would be the hospital's responsibility to find a safe place to discharge the patient to. Tell them you're unable to care for them.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

The regularity of family murder in Japan has me confused as to how Japan keeps plugging such a statistically low murder rate. My guess is, their statistics are fudged and only include violent murders and not family murders

Well, no. Te statistics are actual counts of actual murders. Whereas you belief that Japan has an extraordinary family murder rate comes from tabloid news aimed at creating that impression. Most such family murders in the US, for example, don't make the national news even.

Take a break from the news - it creates a misleading impression of the world.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Like I have said here a MILLION times do YOU wanna grow old in Japan, THIS is the future for far far far too too many!!

THIS is Japan's way of dealing with old folks, let they take each other out,...…..cheaper that way....

What a MESS this country is becoming!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

. But why does killing them seem to be the first answer that comes to mind?

Because these people are at their wits end. They have lost their wits and act out of desperation.

I certainly hope I don't become a burden on anyone like her husband became. Personally, I would rather die...just hopefully in a more pleasant way than being suffocated.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Hmm. Explains why they never officially married.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Like I have said here a MILLION times do YOU wanna grow old in Japan, THIS is the future for far far far too too many!!

You know someplace better to grow old? And how is it better exactly? Growing old and infirm is an indignity wherever you are, and I have heard plenty of horror stories in Europe and the US.

Easy to understand why some old folks insist on staying alone in their shack in the mountains or woods rather than coming in to live in a care home or with relatives. They may die earlier that way, but at least they go out on their own terms and not dependent or a burden on others.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

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