crime

Yakuza membership lowest since 1992, police say

21 Comments

Yakuza membership is at its lowest since anti-gang legislation was introduced in 1992, police say.

Police estimate that the current number, including associate members, was around 73,000 at the end of last year, which they claim is down roughly 8,300 on the previous year's figure, the National Police Agency said in a report released to media.

The announcement follows the news that reported cases of shoplifting by yakuza members are on the rise, prompting police and the government to conjecture that recent crackdowns on organized crime are cutting off previously reliable sources of yakuza funding.

"It appears they're having trouble paying their bills and making ends meet," a police spokesperson was quoted as saying, TBS reported.

Although cases of theft and shoplifting by gang members are on the increase, acquisition of money by intimidation is thought to be decreasing, police said.

© Japan Today

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

21 Comments
Login to comment

“It appears they’re having trouble paying their bills and making ends meet,” a police spokesperson was quoted as saying, TBS reported.

doesn't seem the work of organized crime like Yakuza, most likely ordinary people (jobless homeless) etc..

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Yakuza membership is at its lowest since anti-gang legislation was introduced in 1992, police announced this week.

How would that be determined?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Yakuza membership is suffering like Sumo. Young people are simply realizing there are other usually better options available.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Farmboy - Probably through a survey of police asking if they have Yakuza connections.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@Farmboy - Like most things, I'm pretty sure there is a registry somewhere. It is almost April, time for the new incoming Yakuza to start there Sempai/Kohai training.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Maybe they need a new campaign to get with the program - discount membership fee with a New Member's gift of dark sunglasses; a cute and friendly cartoon character temporary tattoo sticker; and a point card system ("Extort 10, get one free!!")

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Maria

Maybe they need a new campaign to get with the program

Shouldn't the government step in? This is indeed a travesty of Japanese traditions, isn't it? Maybe an AKB48 poster?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Aaah schucks more of Japans traditional culture on the wane........

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Perhaps the discrepancy in numbers can be rectified by taking a census of people newly hired by the numerous yakuza front companies.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Ha, "only" 73.000!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Farmboy They go door to door and just ask them to tick a box yes or no. lol But seriously i wonder the same thing.

I sad it before, that crime was going to increase with the crackdown. These guys are getting desperate. Like the saying goes...its gonna get worse before it gets better. My question is will it stop when the crackdown gets too close to public officials with yakuza ties or is this just the yakuza's way of cleaning house trying to make a more streamline yakuza.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Maybe they just count the real estate companies, especially the ones with a lot of tattooed employees that are missing pinkies. I agree with some14some - I find it hard to believe many yakuza are shoplifting. It's.... dishonest.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

borscht - Poster slogan: YKZ47

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

how do they take census on Yakuza members?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I read somewhere that Japan has had a lower birth-rate for years. Could it just be that the number is down but the percentage of young Yakuza remains the same?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Yakuza membership is at its lowest since anti-gang legislation was introduced in 1992, police announced this week.

How would that be determined?

The police are looking in their "gift" envelopes from "concerned citizens" and finding the amounts are lower than previous envelopes. Ergo, the number of "concerned citizens" must be decreasing.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The Yakuza has gone white collar and it's just not as appealing anymore. Perhaps they should start selling iPads instead.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The gangs probably mail in their membership lists annually, with addresses, phone numbers, family members, bank accounts. The police respond by ignoring every name on the list to concentrate on more dangerous individuals, like bicycle-riding foreigners.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

borschtMAR. 19, 2012 - 09:26AM JST

Maria Maybe they need a new campaign to get with the program Shouldn't the government step in? This is indeed a travesty of Japanese traditions, isn't it? Maybe an AKB48 poster?

My first thought, AKB48 could help. They sell everything. I saw a commercial this weekend with AKB'ers passing some candy from mouth to mouth. Much better seen than it sounds. Don't know what the candy was, other than it was white.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Soldave: maybe YKZ893 is more convincing :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

lol is this real they should do this in america

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites