entertainment

Drama and exhibition portray lives of Japanese women in UK

7 Comments
By William Hollingworth

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

7 Comments
Login to comment

These so called “Immediate stereotypes” I have never heard of in the UK, so am a little suspicious as to their origin?

10 ( +10 / -0 )

I'm curious about how Japanese people get on in the UK so I'll have to see if any of this is online.

I'm a little surprised at the ideal mother-type stereotypes mentioned and would have expected more something on a much lower level, that is, Japanese being mistaken for Chinese and receiving anti-Chinese sentiment, especially in the 1960s and 1970s.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Japanese being mistaken for Chinese and receiving anti-Chinese sentiment, especially in the 1960s and 1970s.

It's still happening now, with the violence directed at anyone looking remotely East Asian in the UK, and not to mention, worst of all, USA.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

It's still happening now, with the violence directed at anyone looking remotely East Asian in the UK, and not to mention, worst of all, USA.

I have many friends that are Japanese that live in Los Angeles and they love it. They tell me Americans are very nice to them.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

British Royal tea and biscuits made Japanese love for the Britain.

I tell u, it's not really good though.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

q: a kind of "third" space.

That's quite common for anyone who emigrates. The first generation have to deal with the loss of what they left behind - family, friends, the places they grew up, language and culture - and their persistent otherness to the locals in their new country. Some cultural gaps are wider than others, and some differences (race, accent) are more obvious than others (local terms and phrases, cultural references).

Social media and Zoom may have changed things a little. Japanese people are relatively thin on the ground in the UK. Immigration from other parts of the world is far more common. Being more 'exotic' may reduce the amount of antagonism a migrant faces. There will still be stereotyping because it is hardwired into how people deal with the world around them. It is not always negative or abusive, although it may become irritating quite rapidly.

I would guess you can become quite vulnerable to things beyond your control. Being Russian, even if you despise Putin, can't be easy right now for emigrants and those studying abroad. Prejudice is all too easily ignited.

There is a certain amount of luck involved. If you were a female teenage Aussie emigrating to the UK in the late 80s when Kylie Minogue was appearing in 'Neighbours', you could expect to be very popular indeed at your new school. But if you were a Japanese guy who stepped off the plane when 'Tenko' was being broadcast, your luck was out.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Interesting exhibition, I have seen a lot being written about people in general or women in particular after they leave Japan to make a new life overseas, but mostly it is done from the Japanese perspective, it would be interesting to see the stories being told from the side of the adopting country and see how they compare.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites