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Uniqlo appoints green Doraemon as Global Sustainability Ambassador

24 Comments

Global apparel retailer Uniqlo on Monday announces that it has appointed Doraemon as its Global Sustainability Ambassador. The name of the green model of the internationally beloved blue Japanese manga and anime character is “Doraemon Sustainability Mode.” Presented with the Uniqlo logo also rendered in green, he will help convey the many ways in which Uniqlo materializes its sustainability message of “Changing our future through the power of clothing”.

“We are delighted to partner with Doraemon,” said Koji Yanai, Group Senior Executive Officer, Fast Retailing. “Over the past two decades, Uniqlo has undertaken numerous sustainability initiatives through business to contribute to a better, more sustainable world. We believe that the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, social transformations, and evolving consumer attitudes make it more important than ever to collaborate with customers and other stakeholders in driving positive social change.”

Doraemon hails from Japan and has become beloved by people of all ages, all around the world. As Uniqlo Global Sustainability Ambassador, Doraemon, who has traveled back in time, will help create a better future for the world by presenting the brand’s sustainability initiatives in fun and easily understandable ways. Rendering Doraemon and the Uniqlo logo green underscores the company’s determination to accelerate its sustainability efforts. Doraemon Sustainability Mode will feature in Uniqlo stores around the world, the brand websites, and other channels.

“As a LifeWear Special Ambassador, I am very happy to be involved in Uniqlo’s sustainability efforts. I too wish to learn together with everyone else and contribute, even if a few steps at a time, to a sustainable environment and society,” said Japanese actress Haruka Ayase.

Doraemon joins Ayase and Uniqlo Global Brand Ambassadors Roger Federer, Kei Nishikori, Shingo Kunieda, Gordon Reid, Ayumu Hirano and Adam Scott in taking UNIQLO's sustainability initiatives forward. The six Uniqlo Global Brand Ambassadors will also contribute to these endeavors through sport and by wearing everyday apparel incorporating environmentally friendly materials.

Source: Fast Retailing

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24 Comments
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Talk about trivializing a serious issue.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

It’s obvious marketing through ‘virtue signaling’ - and, most of us are tired of it. This is not ‘Entertainment’.

Paraphrased for brevity: “Uniqlo (has) contributed to a better, more sustainable world. WE believe that the impact of the pandemic, social transformations, and evolving attitudes make it more important to collaborate with stakeholders in driving positive social change.

The ‘source’ of this ‘promotional mix’ of news & advertising is Fast Retailing Co., Ltd. (株式会社ファーストリテイリング, Kabushiki Kaisha Fāsuto Riteiringu) is a public Japanese retail holding company; its primary subsidiary Uniqlo, owns several other brands, including GU.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

He looks like a cheerful oyaji.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Now they can push prices up again.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I do not think Doraemon is very well known outside Asia. Dragonball or Mario would be a better choice.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Doraemon has powers like a “leprechaun” and now, colors to match.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Great news for Toyama where he originated.

UNIQLO has cheap good design clothes, but their sizes don’t fit me!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Doraemon the greenwasher.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Sustainability???!!!! Start by reducing the use of plastic here.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Using a cute anime character does not invalidate the truth:

Uniqlo sells Chinese made clothes which contributes to China being the #1 polluter.

These clothes are made by slave labor.

The amount of plastic Uniqlo rips through in a year is abhorrent.

But the cute character invalidates all this like magic.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

and Water .... you cant even begin to imagine ... how much water they destroy ..

kyushubillToday 10:57 am JST

Using a cute anime character does not invalidate the truth:

Uniqlo sells Chinese made clothes which contributes to China being the #1 polluter.

These clothes are made by slave labor.

The amount of plastic Uniqlo rips through in a year is abhorrent.

But the cute character invalidates all this like magic.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Oh, how cute.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Last year, Uniqlo/GU were collecting “used clothes” butcan we imagine that would be possible anymore?

Of course, with safety protocols, IF they could reinstate the program,

would everyone prefer a discount, or, better yet,

a donation to help clean up environmental issues?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My goodness - how utterly silly.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The greener the label....rofl No, in fact there is such an indescribable massive overproduction, the closets of all people are already more than full, the same for the stores , triggered by low corona sales, and the whole business destroys intentionally tons of new clothes and other fashion accessories on a daily base, just to keep the prices , delivery chains and the whole industry in general further running. It’s a mess, but definitely not green at all....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

thepersoniamnowToday  08:11 am JST

He looks like a cheerful oyaji.

Boku DayoToday  12:51 pm JST

Oh, how cute.

Sort of a green Tony the Tiger.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Recently, we have been buying clothing items, light pullovers, made from recycled PET bottles. 60% recycled plastic and 40% wool. They are actually very nice to wear.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Recently, we have been buying clothing items, light pullovers, made from recycled PET bottles. 60% recycled plastic and 40% wool. They are actually very nice to wear.

Which brand?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Don't know without checking. We buy them in an Aeon store.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

snowymountainhellToday  07:57 am JST

It’s obvious marketing through ‘virtue signaling’ - and, most of us are tired of it. This is not ‘Entertainment’.

Paraphrased for brevity: “Uniqlo (has) contributed to a better, more sustainable world. WE believe that the impact of the pandemic, social transformations, and evolving attitudes make it more important to collaborate with stakeholders in driving positive social change.”

Stuff like this makes me groan. Meaningless puffery they can feel good about while doing business with the biggest and most blatant polluter of all, China.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

So what makes them better than Zara and the likes of “pronto moda” or fast fashion ?

Only the maskot in green?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

.

BigYenToday  07:43 am JST

Talk about trivializing a serious issue.

.

True. how absolutely banal. . . .though

this fixation on these caricatures reflect the immature & superficial dimension of the modern J mind, IMO

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The larger sizes in Uniqlo need to be ordered online.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So, the entire Gouda family won’t find their sizes ’in store’? @zichi 12:19a. A&F’s CEO had a terrible attitude that “larger, ’foreign’ sizes are ‘not welcome’ in their stores and shouldn’t be wearing their brands.

We’re, almost, certain ‘FaSt Retailing’ brands don’t have such an attitude, considering their CEO Koji Yanai’s pledge above: “...through business, contribute to a better world. We believe the impact of social transformations & evolving consumer attitudes make it more important than ever to collaborate with customers in driving positive social change.”

So, yes, larger sizes for Takeshi “Gian”, Jiako, Mrs. and Mr. can be found ‘online’. (Got a Great “Spring Coat” and Rain coat this year!) -

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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