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With K-pop back in U.S. spotlight, Korean-American stars take hope

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JimizoAug. 14 11:22 am JSTK-pop is okay.

The music snobs love to sneer. They are so predictable.

Snobs used to sneer at ABBA but Lemmy of Motorhead and Dave Grohl (Nirvana/Foo Fighters) likes them, and ABBA influenced quite a number of euro-/techno-/hi NRG bands and now are respected.

I remember also when I was in HS the band RUSH was HATED by critics. They were derided as a 'poor man's Led Zep' or worse. Rock snobs trashed them all the time, and they esp. panned the voice of Geddy Lee. The last few times I saw RUSH the crowd consisted of people of every age, race, color, fans of various styles - hard rock junkies, metalheads, grungsters, punks, proggers. They are short-hair, long-hair, mohawks, skinheads, mulletheads, spiked hair and more. And RUSH now is finally getting the critical respect that they deserve.

ABBA and RUSH are both in the R'N'R HOF and they deserve it. Duran Duran used to get panned but critics like them too. So you never can tell.  

0 ( +0 / -0 )

K-pop is okay.

The music snobs love to sneer. They are so predictable.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

WakarimasenAug. 13 01:48 pm JSTThe "class" behind him don't look like they are learning anything. K Pop may fade but lots of other "fads" out of Asia have caught on in US and Europe. Karaoke, various Asian cuisines, upskirting, anime, manga, and many others.

Next month I'm going to see the lady J-punk trio Shonen Knife again. The anime/manga/cosplay type crowd often comes to a Shonen Knife show. They style themselves like the Ramones along with inspirations of sci-fy, the Beach Boys, girl group harmonies and Japanese culture features such as their movies for their lyrical themes. Kurt Cobain was a big fan of them and they are fun. They have quite a following in the USA.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not that they suck (Kpop does, other Korean stuff is actually quite good) but the days of Boy Bands isn't what it used to be (thank God).

Totally right. K-pop is pop slop but there's some good K-rock out there. Last year I went to a punk/noise rock show featuring 5 bands - 2 American, 1 Korean, 1 Russian and 1 Greek. The K-punk band was '57' (pronounced as 'oh chill'). They are an outstanding male guitar/female drum duo in the mold of White Stripes but they are loud, exciting, innovative - they totally awed everyone in the club! Language wasn't really an issue, the guitarist made some serious shredding, vibrating, etc. and the drummer was fierce - she splintered a drumstick from her slamming!  57 is categorized as K-rock, K-punk. K-noise (like Sonic Youth) with the 'K' = 'Korean' but it really means 'KICK-ASS'! 57 is WICKED! They will rock your socks off, guaranteed.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Just as the idiotic "Gangnam Style" signified the beginning of nothing (the Asian equivalent of the "Macarina"), there has been no surge in the popularity of K-pop in the U.S. K-pop may be huge amongst the Korean diaspora here, but it stops there.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The Koreans in America are the best kind. High-achieving Ivy League intellects.

Elitists. I'd sooner doff my cap to a decent, hard-working store clerk than some frat boy from Harvard etc.

K-pop is universal, let the snobs sneer whilst the rest of us dance.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

The "class" behind him don't look like they are learning anything.  K Pop may fade but lots of other "fads" out of Asia have caught on in US and Europe.  Karaoke, various Asian cuisines, upskirting, anime, manga, and many others.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

“They told me it’s difficult for people who are Caucasian or black or Latino to feel that way toward an Asian person,”

and yet Asians all around the world consume American media. Pathetic.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Take a look at the peeps behind him. LOL!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I know a majority of us here embrace Korea and feel sorrow over the hardships they faced during WWII. However, though they work hard in promoting their entertainment industry and products to Western countries, there are still many who keep their culture closed to other countries.

I grew up in Los Angeles where we have a large Korean population and even Koreatown district. There are still many Korean families who forbid their children to marry or even date outside their ethnicity. Doing this may risk them being thrown out of the family. My best friend was Korean as well as 3 of my caucasian friends faced these issues. It might be a minor thing for many here but I think if Korea wants to be fully embraced, they should have more of a open heart towards non-Koreans.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

The Koreans in America are the best kind. High-achieving Ivy League intellects.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Gangnam Style was a one hit wonder, Psy failed to make any gains with the following songs he made and one included Snoop Dogg.  Tens of thousands of fans is just a tiny blip, it doesn't mean US fans are jumping on this wave.  The Korean wave will crash and recede on the wave breaker that is the American music industry and not get far on these shores.  Not that they suck (Kpop does, other Korean stuff is actually quite good) but the days of Boy Bands isn't what it used to be (thank God).  If they even want a chance to be heard, they better do it in English.  Unfortunately most Americans don't like to listen to non-English songs.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

I live in Southern Cal, and I have noticed a big increase in the number of Korean immigrants to the area. Fine with me, as they seem to be mostly hard working and friendly. One of my bosses was an escapee from from North Korea, back when I was still working, and he was very commendable. As for K pop, I am too out of touch to understand it, but got to give credit to their dancing and singing credentials....first rate. I am very impressed with Asian skills in film and TV productions. A lot of American productions have gotten their cue from Korean and Japanese origins. Japan's "The Seven Samurai," by Kurosawa, has been a big influence on movie making the world over. Also, the Japanese version of "Shall We Dance" got a couple of American remakes into production. IMO, the originals of both movies are by far the best. The Korean TV melodrama "The Good Doctor" was remade last year in America, and I think it was the number one melodrama on our TV. A key to its success, IMO, is that they brought over several of the Koreans behind the camera to be the artistic inspiration. Still, the Korean original was better. Am a big fan of Korean TV and film. Of course, most of it is not remarkable, but the amount of truly outstanding productions is amazing. Have seen and enjoyed a few Japanese, Chinese, and Taiwanese TV productions, but am surprised that there are not more of them that make a splash. I suspect that the lack of artistic freedom in China holds back their achievements.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

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