Japan Today
entertainment

Actor Sam Neill reveals blood cancer diagnosis

15 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© 2023 AFP

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

15 Comments
Login to comment

Hang in there Sam! I have visited your little stall at the end of your driveway many times in Central. A stunning property

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Sad, sad news.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

As a cancer survivor, my sympathy goes out to all suffering from it.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

"Blood cancer" is a terribly unspecific term that may be used on purpose by Neil to avoid having too close a focus on the diagnosis, but judging from how he talks about the disease it would be safe to assume it is serious enough to expect it will become the cause of his death.

At least he seems to be taking the situation well and getting something positive in the middle of his personal tragedy, hope he can still enjoy his life and maybe even experience a recovery.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Looks like blood cancer is a very specific term according to the experts. Get well Sam.

The three main types of blood cancer

https://www.cancercenter.com/blood-cancers

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

The type doctors know the most about is called Hodgkin's lymphoma (or Hodgkin's disease). (All others are called non-Hodgkin lymphoma.) It's the most common form of blood cancer in adults, accounting for over half of all diagnosed blood cancer cases.

"Jurassic Park" star Sam Neill revealed that while he was on tour promoting "Jurassic World Dominion" last year, he was also battling stage 3 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Neill said he is in remission now, though he still faces "dark days" and difficult challenges, like losing his hair during his first round of chemotherapy — a treatment he still receives, though his tumors have gone away.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Looks like blood cancer is a very specific term according to the experts. Get well Sam.

No, "blood cancer" is not an unspecific term.

Both accounts are incorrect of course "blood cancer" is a very unspecific term, it does not even say what kind of the many different types of blood cancer he is talking about, compared with a proper diagnosis it is a clearly unspecific term, obviously used on purpose instead of the actual diagnosis. Each type of cancer of blood tissue has different prognosis and risks, even at the same stage.

Judging from what is written in the article, it is not only safe to assume, as you note, but it is exactly. what he assumes.

One thing is what he assumes, another is what everybody else would, specially medical professionals. "Possibly dying" from the disease is very different from having that as the medical prognosis, it is likely but not something certain without knoing more details.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Sam's tweets about his life on the farm in New Zealand are a delight. Looks like he has really been enjoying life out there. Hopes he gets back to good health soon.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

The only cancer Sam Neill is concerned about is the one he has.

stage III adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Cancer is found (1) in groups of lymph nodes both above and below the diaphragm; or (2) in lymph nodes above the diaphragm and in the spleen.

https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/stage-iii-adult-non-hodgkin-lymphoma

During my cancer op, several lymph nodes were removed.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

wallaceToday  08:44 am JST

The only cancer Sam Neill is concerned about is the one he has.

Exactly. And his blood cancer is very specific, according to the medical experts.

And obviously his quote he is "possibly dying" comes from his medical diagnosis informed to him by his medical experts.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Exactly. And his blood cancer is very specific, according to the medical experts.

Obviously, what is not specific at all is the term "blood cancer",

And obviously his quote he is "possibly dying" comes from his medical diagnosis informed to him by his medical experts

Quote where in the article this is written, this can be his personal conclusion, for a stage III non-Hodgkin lymphoma the 5 year survival rates can still be good enough to be optimistic. Unless you can present details about the diagnosis (obviously much more specific than it just being "blood cancer") you are just making an assumption not supported by the available information.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Obviously, what is not specific at all is the term "blood cancer",

Of course the term wouldn't be specific if you have no medical background.

So for you, Yale Medicine's website answers that basic question:

"What is blood cancer?

Cancer is caused by a dysfunction in cellular growth and behavior. In a healthy body, new white blood cells are regularly generated to replace old, dying ones. The excessive production of white blood cells in the bone marrow leads to blood cancers. "

https://www.yalemedicine.org/conditions/blood-cancers

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Of course the term wouldn't be specific if you have no medical background.

The term is not specific for everybody, specially those that understand a real diagnostic, if you think this is an specific term what is the survival rate for this specific health problem?

So for you, Yale Medicine's website answers that basic question:

What is the point of bringing a reference that actually contradict your claim? precisely because the term include several "blood cancers" (as in plural) is why it is not specific.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Anyone who read the content of the link (or my above post) sees this specific use of a medical term by Yale Medicine, which proves you completely wrong again:

If the term includes many different kinds of cancers, each with widely different treatments, prognosis, etc. That means your link actually proved the term is not specific but the opposite. That is what anybody that can read even the quote can easily confirm.

The definition made by Yale Medicine is a perfectly valid source to disprove your claim, even if you try to misrepresnt it as if it was saying the opposite of what it actually says.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites