entertainment

Ashley Judd talks about mental health after mother's death

6 Comments
By The Associated Press

Ashley Judd encouraged people to seek help for their mental health and talked about her grieving process after the loss of her mother, country star Naomi Judd.

In an interview aired on “Good Morning America” on Thursday, the movie star said she wanted to address her mother's struggle with depression. Judd said she was with her mother at her home in Tennessee on the day Naomi died on April 30.

Judd also encouraged anyone who was having thoughts of harming themselves to reach out to The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

Naomi Judd died at the age of 76, a day before she was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame with her duo partner and daughter Wynonna Judd. In a statement provided to The Associated Press, the family said they had lost her to “the disease of mental illness.”

“When we’re talking about mental illness, it’s very important, and to be clear and to make the distinction between our loved one and the disease," Judd said in the interview. "It lies. It’s savage. And, you know, my mother, our mother, couldn’t hang on until she was inducted into the Hall of Fame by her peers. I mean, that is the level of catastrophe of what was going on inside of her because the barrier between — the regard in which they held her couldn’t penetrate into her heart. And the lie that the disease told her was so convincing.”

Ashley Judd said that her mother shot herself with a gun, but asked for privacy on other details of the death. Naomi Judd wrote openly about her depression and anxiety in her memoir “River of Time" and daughter Ashley said it was because of this that she cherished every moment she spent with her mother.

“I really accepted the love my mother was capable of giving me because I knew she was fragile,” Judd said. “So when I walked around the back of their house and came in the kitchen door and she said, ‘There’s my darling, there’s my baby.’ And she lit up. I savored those moments.”

Naomi and Wynonna Judd scored 14 No. 1 songs in a career that spanned nearly three decades. The red-headed duo combined the traditional Appalachian sounds of bluegrass with polished pop stylings, scoring hit after hit in the 1980s. Wynonna led the duo with her powerful vocals, while Naomi provided harmonies and stylish looks on stage.

The Judds released six studio albums and an EP between 1984 and 1991 and won nine Country Music Association Awards and seven from the Academy of Country Music. They earned a total of five Grammy Awards together on hits like “Why Not Me” and “Give A Little Love,” and Naomi earned a sixth Grammy for writing “Love Can Build a Bridge.”

If you or someone you know in Japan are having suicidal thoughts, you can get help. Click here for more info.

© Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

6 Comments
Login to comment

Such a lifelong ordeal and heartbreaking ending to what many fans imagined was Naomi’s glorious life. Let’s hope the Judd sisters continue to nurture each other and find solace in knowing their mom gave so love much to her fans as well. Rest In Peace, Naomi Judd.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

"Mother's death" is a strange way to say suicide.

-10 ( +0 / -10 )

She's considerably aged. I didn't recognize her at all.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

snowymountainhellToday  09:01 am JST

Such a lifelong ordeal and heartbreaking ending to what many fans imagined was Naomi’s glorious life. Let’s hope the Judd sisters continue to nurture each other and find solace in knowing their mom gave so love much to her fans as well. Rest In Peace, Naomi Judd.

Depression destroys. On Christmas Eve 2016, my old college GF lost her battle with bipolar depression. i saw in the funeral home a home video of her life. Later in her life I could see the hurt and pain in her beautiful brown eyes and like the time when we dated, I was helpless. I wanted so bad to 'enter' that film during the later periods of time and take her away. Take her by the hand and make everything alright for her. But just like in the 90s, I wasn't able to and I knew it. I couldn't ease her pain then and I sure can't now. And even now it makes me cry sometimes.

It's a serious condition that needs more attention than it does get. Suicide is not an answer. It hurts.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Depression is definitely something that we need to help with as a society and culture, and not stigmatize the people or just tell them they'll be fine later. Encourage them to talk, always, if not to you or other loved ones or friends, then a professional. And THAT, too, needs to be normalized here -- it is not a sign of weakness to reach out when you need help. You end up with people bottling it up and putting on a brave face, then without warning they have killed themselves, or tried. Heck, Japan is no stranger to this; in a matter of six days we had Hiroyuki Watanabe and then Ryuhei Ueshima commit suicide, not to mention all the other celebrities that have also done so this year alone. And yet, we see the contrary to making it more acceptable to discuss suicide or people with suicidal thoughts, and seeking help. Need proof? Not a single article about either celebrity dying that I can find on his site, despite both being immensely popular, and the deaths of both being a shock. Ms. Judd is mentioned, I'm assuming, because it is not domestic and is therefore "safer" to talk about for the few that wish to offer an opinion.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

You end up with people bottling it up and putting on a brave face, then without warning they have killed themselves, or tried. Heck, Japan is no stranger to this; in a matter of six days we had Hiroyuki Watanabe and then Ryuhei Ueshima commit suicide, not to mention all the other celebrities that have also done so this year alone. And yet, we see the contrary to making it more acceptable to discuss suicide or people with suicidal thoughts, and seeking help. Need proof? Not a single article about either celebrity dying that I can find on his site, despite both being immensely popular, and the deaths of both being a shock. Ms. Judd is mentioned, I'm assuming, because it is not domestic and is therefore "safer" to talk about for the few that wish to offer an opinion.

You're probably right on that one. Hiroyuki Watanabe and Ryuhei Ueshima as far as I know are celebrities in Japan only where the Judds have had international fame and so have Soundgarden. And let's not forget Nirvana.

Big difference. The problem here in the US is that there'll be 'pity parties' and such and then some boorish ignorant cretins will blabber and sass off about these people being 'weak' or 'couldn't handle fame' or 'couldn't handle life' or some other arrogant crap. And the ignorance goes on and on.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites