entertainment

Gov't, 7 broadcasters make joint effort to promote TV formats in overseas markets

11 Comments

Seven Japanese broadcasters, Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK), Nippon Television Network Corporation (NTV), TV Asahi Corporation (TV Asahi), Tokyo Broadcasting System Television, Inc (TBS), TV Tokyo Corporation (TV Tokyo), Fuji Television Network Inc, (Fuji TV), and Asahi Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), and the Japanese government (Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications / Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) will make a joint effort to promote Japanese TV formats in overseas markets by holding an All-Japan event, “TREASURE BOX JAPAN ~ NEW FORMATS DINNER” on Oct 7 in Cannes, France.

The world’s largest international content market, MIPCOM, is held in Cannes every October. This year on the eve of its opening day, a VIP Gala Dinner will introduce the newest and most spectacular Japanese TV formats. The dinner, co-hosted by the Japanese government and TV broadcasters, will include 120 top personnel representing major TV stations and production companies from around the world.

During the event, all of the seven Japanese broadcasters will present their best program concepts, including those from their variety/entertainment shows, in an exciting video presentation. Innovative and original ideas are abundant in Japanese TV formats and those in the TV industry who have been exposed to them call Japan “an unexcavated gold mine.” By presenting the formats directly to the executives of the companies worldwide participating in MIPCOM, the seven broadcasters hope to boost their results at the MIPCOM content market which starts the next day.

The title of the Gala, “TREASURE BOX JAPAN,” conveys the image of the abundance of hidden gems just waiting to be discovered by opening a treasure trove of Japanese content and formats.

Japanese broadcasters have been attending MIPCOM individually since the 1980s, but their activities so far have never been united into an all-Japan effort. Content companies from South Korea and China have been enhancing their exports through the national policy efforts of their governments in the past few years. The Japanese Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications and Ministry of Economy are also both active in promoting content sales to the international market. The Japanese broadcasters came up with this unique approach, focusing on the strength of Japanese content – innovation and creativity.

Treasure Box Japan will be the first joint effort of the Japanese government and the broadcasters of Japan to promote their entertainment content and formats in the international market. The event will also feature a performance by “SIRO-A”, a group from Sendai presenting their techno comedy routine that is gaining popularity world wide.

The Japanese broadcasters plan to continue their cooperative efforts in the future. In the past, the location of their booths at the Mipcom market were scattered throughout the venue, but they plan to move their booths closer together at upcoming markets, creating a “Japan Village,” in the hope of making a stronger presence for content and formats produced in Japan.

© Japan Today

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Innovative and original ideas are abundant in Japanese TV formats

Is that the "room full of half-wits shouting" format or the "oishi / umai" food eating format? I don't think they have any other formats here.

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“TREASURE BOX JAPAN,” conveys the image of the abundance of hidden gems just waiting to be discovered by opening a treasure trove of Japanese content and formats.

That's right. Watching celebrities play air hockey, guess the price of menu items, and try oishii food are some of the 'hidden gem' formats that will entertain the world for decades.

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Haha. Do you think anyone would watch this inanity. Total garbage pit on J-TV.

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Great ! I miss Japanese tv ! I am looking forward to watch the Japanese broadcatstings in Italy too !!

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So Japanese really can't do anything if they are not in groups. Sad.

Japanese TV has an abundance of pretty crappy TV but there are some gems:

• Before After with Tokoro George on Sundays is not Half bad. Quite watchable. • There was a show a few years back (forgot name, maybe still around?) with a guy, wearing a hat and glasses walking around in Tokyo, visiting local restaurants, chatting with punters and eating and drinking lots of good stuff. • Many nature or travel programs are really good. As long as they let the locals talk and don't put Japanese voiceovers, all is good.

I don't think Japanese TV is that sellable abroad, though. Much of it is just to damn silly or just plain weird.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The Koreans have made huge inroads in TV and entertainment in Asia. The Japanese see this and say, "We must do the same thing." The problem is that the Japanese don't realize how awful most of their programming, acting and screenwriting really are.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

nice one japan!! ganbatte,,,

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The Koreans have made huge inroads in TV and entertainment in Asia. The Japanese see this and say, "We must do the same thing." The problem is that the Japanese don't realize how awful most of their programming, acting and screenwriting really are.

except Koreans have done this with dramas, which Japan does 10x better. if you're trying to say that Korean dramas have good acting or screenwriting then I feel sorry for your taste levels.

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@lachatamber

except Koreans have done this with dramas, which Japan does 10x better.

I spoke with someone in Vietnam who said a Japanese TV drama was aired there for a while. Everyone hated it because the some of the characters acted really loudly and stupidly, in a way that Vietnamese find annoying and embarrassing, apparently. Meanwhile the most popular shows in VN tend to be Korean, whose characters, I assume, tend to be more natural and credible.

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I spoke with someone in Vietnam

your source is one person who lives in Vietnam that you don't even know? umm..

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@lachatamber

your source is one person who lives in Vietnam that you don't even know? umm..

Wrong. Someone I do know, who witnessed the situation first hand, and explained it to me. You got a problem with that? Who is your "source"?

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