entertainment

Hip-hop turns 40 -- and its parents are beaming with pride

17 Comments
By Leo Mouren

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17 Comments
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Sad thing is that precious few rap artists are worth listening to at all anymore. I've never been big into hip hop, but when I do it has to have meaning, or just be a pleasure to hear. What I've heard from modern rappers lately has literally felt like it was killing my brain cells, and inspiring hard blatant ignorance and utter stupidity.

Unlike jazz and blues which still is a pleasure to listen to from the majority of artists out there.

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HonestDictatorToday 07:36 am JSTSad thing is that precious few rap artists are worth listening to at all anymore. I've never been big into hip hop, but when I do it has to have meaning, or just be a pleasure to hear. What I've heard from modern rappers lately has literally felt like it was killing my brain cells, and inspiring hard blatant ignorance and utter stupidity.

I barely remember when Melle Mel and Run-DMC and such were predominant in hip-hop. They did have something to say - and it was fun to listen to too. The Fat Boys were a bit funny too. When 2 Live Cru and NWA came around it all went downhill and most rappers today are so banal and they have virtually nothing to say. It's just crime, filthy sex, dope, ego and violence for many of them. The early rappers didn't sample so much background music either, it was played so really it was 'rap-rock'.

Jazz and blues artists don't sample, they play. They're original. That's what make most of their music a pleasure to listen to. Even more since most jazz is instrumental.

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Blues, jazz, rock n roll, hip hop we have a lot to thank America for. They pioneered the game! Hip hop is now truly a global phenomenon . Sounds good in Japanese too, especially when it’s real. Gives a voice to those with somethin to say, and dang when it’s done well it sounds so good!

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Can't believe it has been that long.

I remember listening to FEN in the late '70s when I was in elementary school and fell in love with Chic! Just such awesome music, pre-rap.

Then was back in the U.S. for a few years in middle school. And I remember the first time I was when I heard Rapper's Delight and saw that video!! It was just awesome!! And, of course, we all worked to memorize the lyrics!!

And also hearing Blondie's "Rapture", which included a little rap bit.

And we were off to the races!!

Sugarhill Gang followed up Rapper's Delight with Apache, another great tune!!

And then there was Frankie Smith's legendary "Double Dutch Bus" a year later.

And then it was just such a great few years in the music scene.....

-- Grandmaster Flash and "White Lines"...

-- Break dancing....

-- Boom boxes....

-- And so many fresh, cool artists.....

And, of course, mid '80s we got Run DMC, which took it to another level!!

So much to celebrate and to remember!!!

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Beat street breakdown...

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Actually, Hip Hop was coined as a culture by the Universal Zulu Nation in 1974, so it turned 40 in 2014. The Sugarhill Gang's "Rappers Delight" song was just a catapult exposing the art of rap to mainstream America, and the world, years after the culture was already flourishing in the inner city.

The majority of existing rap fans at that time HATED that song, because it was a disco record, with rappers on it... And most rappers hated disco. If you notice, there were no other major breakthrough disco rap records that came out besides what the Sugarhill Gang released. The genre of rap was far from disco, as disco clubs generally didn't tolerate rappers, breakdancing, and graffiti culture, which makes up 3/4 of hip hop culture.

Everything else being released by hip hop pioneers immediately before AND after that song was either electro-funk or boom bap rap, both of which were embraced by the inner-city youth for their rebellious and non-flashy approach. However, since mainstream society loved the Rapper's Delight song, having never heard anything else like it yet, it blew up, and thus is undoubtedly an important part of the history of hip hop culture.

For those in the comments expressing how terrible the music is today, I take it you're a mainstream listener, one who only heard what the corporate record labels release and pay to have aired on tv and radio. Actual fans of hip hop culture know there is plethora of great, intelligent, witty, and creative rappers still releasing fun and inspiring hip hop music.

If you leave it up to the record industry to shove what they want down your throat then yes, you can be easily fooled into believing hip hop is trash. Very similar to peope who eat Taco Bell and actually believe that it's Mexican food... Then they give their opinions about Mexican food based on their experiences at Taco Bell. Don't be that person.

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I was one of those kids in the early eighties break dancing. That's what hip hop was at first. It was more about break dancing and graffiti art. The emcee came later. When it did, my parents and adults in general were repulsed by it. God I cherish those days: no commericial rap and no sub-genres; just the bloodsport of lyricism and djs scratching. Nowadays, the three pillars of hip hop are all dead on the surface: no one dances creatively; they just twerk; djs don't use vinyl and are clawless; white bohemians jave taken over graffiti; and you can just forget about lyricism. Such a revolutionary genre of music it was; what a beautiful culture created by inner city new york kids that shook the world. All I listen to these days are the late seventies-early eighties south bronx rap. These songs live with me forever: it's just good fun. That's the problem today. Hip hop isnt fun anymore; it's melancholy. The point of hip hop in the beginning was to put down the gun, and instead kill your enemy on the mic. Now it's put down the mic and pick up the gun.

And if you consider 2pac or biggie as the greatest rappers, you don't have the faintest clue.

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Actual fans of hip hop culture know there is plethora of great, intelligent, witty, and creative rappers still releasing fun and inspiring hip hop music.

I doubt that. And why should someone have to dig to the middle of the earth for hip hop. That's why I love the golden era. Every newly released album was originally dope, and you could cop a cassette at sam goody.

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I saved it all if anybody ever wants to throw an Ol'Skool party. I literally have all these jams and more safely here in Japan. Just tell me where the party is at.

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Sad thing is that precious few rap artists are worth listening to at all anymore.

It's like that with all genres now. Let's face it, music went out with the 80s and 90s.

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Hip hop is older than forty. That record is forty but no one knew who the Sugarhill Gang were in my South Bronx neighborhood. However, we were already listening to Grandmaster Flash, Spoonie Gee, Kurtis Blow and the Treacherous Three among others. They just had not yet put their stuff on wax. By the way, skme say King Tim III by the Fatback Band was first.

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I love Jazz and Blues, but that neourone killer music, no thanks..

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It's officially oldies music.

I'm ready for something new.

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Earliest hip hop was more innovative:

https://youtu.be/sYWQpXnNEPM

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I sometimes wish I could jump in a time machine back to 1994 when hip hop was at its best particularly East Coast. I am from the West but leaned more towards East Coast hip hop.

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Actual fans of hip hop culture know there is plethora of great, intelligent, witty, and creative rappers still releasing fun and inspiring hip hop music.

Yes, for sure here are few I like.

Clean when kids are in the car.

Nick Cannon, Common, Will Smith, Chamillionaire, Lupe Fiasco Lil, Mama, A tribe Called Quest, Queen Latifah, Mase, K-Naan, Talib Kweli, Run DMC,

For the not so clean and in the car alone.

Cypress Hill. RBX, Method Man, Red Man, Obtrice, Jay-Z, Beastie Boys, I could go on.

All time favorite right here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjgsNc6qlHE

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

By the way, skme say King Tim III by the Fatback Band was first.

I've heard that Kurtis Blow put out 'Christmas Rapping' even before Sugarhill Gang put out 'Rapper's Delight'.

ATruth&SoulFeb. 4 11:59 am JSTActually, Hip Hop was coined as a culture by the Universal Zulu Nation in 1974, so it turned 40 in 2014. The Sugarhill Gang's "Rappers Delight" song was just a catapult exposing the art of rap to mainstream America, and the world, years after the culture was already flourishing in the inner city.

And I read that DJ Kool Herc started it up with Jamaican style toasting in 1974.

SlickdrifterFeb. 5 04:17 pm JSTActual fans of hip hop culture know there is plethora of great, intelligent, witty, and creative rappers still releasing fun and inspiring hip hop music.

When I was in military boot camp in the mid 80s, we had rappers in our unit who'd make up raps on the spot and they'd rap about events happening at the recruit training center that day. It was spontaneous, instant, and other rappers joined it - and it was mostly clean. No violent or X-rated crap here.

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