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Miyazaki says he's retiring because he can't keep up the pace

18 Comments
By Elaine Kurtenbach

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18 Comments
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Thanks Miyazaki. Love what you did!

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Truly the end of a legend. I heard in other news that he may still make much shorter films at some point, just no longer features. That's a nice thought, as it's hard to imagine the world of animation without him.

And is "Spirited Away" really a critique on modern industrialization? I never got that at all.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I know him and most of the Gibhli stuff we will get his fingers dirty soon.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

And is "Spirited Away" really a critique on modern industrialization? I never got that at all

Yeah. that sounds more like Mononoke Hime.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Miyazaki is very eco friendly.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Thanks for giving the magic of Totoro & Gigi (Kiki's cat) to my little girls' life.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

He was truly the greatest. It's sad to think that all the movies by him now will be the only ones (barring any future projects he might churn out), but for the small number of films, he's definitely changed the world a lot. I just hope Ghibli can continue with his vision as long as possible.

Spirited Away is by far the best of his films and is definitely my favorite film of all time. It transcends animation and creates such a unique world with such real characters. The thing that puzzles me a lot is that there isn't much Spirited Away merchandise and if you've been to the Ghibli Museum, it's as if the film was never made. In the room with the sketches from past movie, Spirited Away's concept art is mysteriously absent and there is a lack of anything of much substance concerning it in the museum, despite it being their most globally well-known. To be frank, having been to the Ghibli Museum 5 times in the past two years, it should more accurately be called the "Totoro Museum". I do love a lot of the original content in the museum, but I think an overhaul of some of the exhibits is in order.

Also, slight correction, but wasn't the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923?

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Where's his "gaman" spirit? Just joking, he's a great man.

“There’s an end to everything,” he said. “It’s best not to wait to retire when one is already in a decline.”

I'm hoping the Japanese original was worded more tactfully. As it is it sounds like Miyazaki's well over the hill and should have retired years ago. What a disrespectful comment.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

DaveAllTheWay: "Yeah. that sounds more like Mononoke Hime."

That's what I was thinking, too, but then they talk about Princess Mononoke later. Weird.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Yes, Great Kanto Earthquake was 1923.

Both Mononoke and Spirited Away have those themes (recall the River God as a potent image/example). Actually, variations on this, sometimes subtle sometimes not so subtle, are woven into much of his work (Nausicaa anyone?)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@cadmium Read that quote one more time carefully. It implies that Miyazaki is NOT in decline yet. It's actually a subtle compliment.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Miyazaki is very true to himself. He's admitting that age-wise, he can't keep up with the times; although working 7-8 hours a day, and taking Saturdays off is no slouch. Admire him for his honesty, and not being ego-centric.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And is "Spirited Away" really a critique on modern industrialization? I never got that at all.

Spirited Away is an amazing film, the best Miyazaki Film, imo.

In parts it's very clearly a criticism of industrialisation and the resultant environmental pollution - the part where Chihiro attends to the Polluted River Spirit, cleanses it in the bath and pulls out all of the rubbish that is clogging it is one. So is the enslavement of Haku - another River Spirit.

Kaonashi creates a commentary on greed and corruption linked to commerce, as does the transformation of her parents into pigs in the dilapidated fairground - symbolic of Economic Bubble Japan.

It's such a clever film.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@jumpultimatestars: I think it's the word "already" that bugs me in that quote. I take the comment to mean "It’s best not to wait to retire when one is already in a decline (like Miyazaki is)", i.e. that Miyazaki is in a decline, and it's best for other people not to wait as long as Miyazaki to retire.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Both Mononoke and Spirited Away have those themes (recall the River God as a potent image/example). Actually, variations on this, sometimes subtle sometimes not so subtle, are woven into much of his work (Nausicaa anyone?)

Nausicaa is so much more blatant about it though.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Miyazaki-sama, arigatou gozaimashita!!!!! Anime wa subarashii desu!!!!

Sorry, I'm a Japanese speaker in training. Don't mean to annoy anyone here. :(

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Among other things, he plans to work on his Ghibli Museum, where he says the exhibits need refreshing

Agree, it is a good museum but needs a little more excitement especially for kids. Also they need to make it a little more foreign visitor friendly as everything is in just Japanese and tickets are hard to buy.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Nausicaa is so much more blatant about it though.

Indeed. That one was a 'not so subtle' :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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