entertainment

Olivia de Havilland, Oscar-winning actress, dies at 104

14 Comments
By HILLEL ITALIE and THOMAS ADAMSON

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14 Comments
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Born in Tokyo during the First World War. Wow, thats something I never expected. She lived through 2 Global pandemics. RIP

7 ( +8 / -1 )

No neither did I. Apparently her father left them for the Japanese housekeeper.. and became a Go master

8 ( +8 / -0 )

A very long life.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

A fine actor. "The Heiress" is a great film.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

As mentioned, born in Tokyo to British parents in 1916, became a US citizen in 1941, lived in France since 1956, last married to a Frenchman. Wrote a best-selling book, "Every Frenchman has one," a comedic account of her efforts to acclimate to French culture.

I was amazed to read that her sister was also an Academy Award winner; Joan Fontaine. Maybe acting was in their genetic makeup?

A fascinating person, one who made the world a better place.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

A wonderful actress.

RIP

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Ms De Havilland was indeed a great actress, but just to prove that even the best actors can make bad movie choices she was also in The Swarm, also starring Richard Chamberlain, which regularly and with good reason makes any list of the Worst Movies of All Time. In that movie, she was stung to death by killer bees - dead, forced to lie on the floor covered by thousands of the insects, she didn't even move a muscle when one of them broke off from the rest and tried to crawl up her nose.

“What made me proud when I went to the rushes,” she said, like a craftsman in any field pleased by doing well at her craft. “is that I didn't move;could see the bee that was entering my nostril, but I didn't move; there was no sign of breathing.”

There you go. What a trouper. RIP.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I enjoyed Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I’m sad to hear it.

Of course, 104 is a long life but I always wondered how longer she might go.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Wow, 104, well done her. Right now, given my health problems, I'll be lucky to make half that.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

She was a lovely lady and a great actress.

so sorry she has departed. thanks for the article.

However a note: the movie did NOT glorify Slavery it told the story as it was then, not the edited "corrected" modern remake of history. Had to correct that she herself was very practical about that issue...and knew history was what it was when it happened.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

The movie featuring Olivia de Havilland as Melanie is the reason Hattie McDaniel ( "Mammy” in Gone with the Wind) became the first African-American to win an Academy Award. Perhaps the movie is of some importance to Black culture.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Apparently her father left them for the Japanese housekeeper.

It seems it was not quite that simple. Olivia's mother Lilian and father Walter met in Japan. She convinced him to leave Japan and the plan was to go back to Britain. The reason for leaving was the health of the daughters as apparently both were not doing too well. Olivia got tonsillitis on the way. So they stopped in San Francisco to treat her but then her little sister got pneumonia. Then it seem Lilian unilaterally decided they would stay in California. It was then that the father, Walter, went back to Japan and got together with the housekeeper. Its obvious by his becoming a Go master that the guy had deep connections to Japan and it must have been hard enough obeying his wife and deciding to go back to Britain. But to then be expected to suddenly forget Britain and just be told to root down in California? Its a bridge too far. He must have felt more like a pet than a husband.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

She was both a UK and US citizen, hence the Damehood from the Queen.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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