Vinyl music is enjoying a renaissance. Photo: Wikipedia
entertainment

Rebirth of vinyl propelled by diversification of music platforms

14 Comments
By Takaki Tominaga

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

14 Comments
Login to comment

Analog produces a more pleasant sound than the 1s and 0s of digital.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Yes, now I need to show this article to my wife that other people do listen to vinyl still. She is trying to toss out my records.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Still got all my vinyl and very grateful that i do.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

In 2016, 799,000 vinyl records were sold in Japan, up 21 percent from the previous year and eightfold from 2009, with revenue of 1.45 billion yen ($13.05 million), according to data released by the Recording Industry Association of Japan.

These figures don't tell the real story as they only concern themselves with new vinyl sales. Anyone familiar with record stores will know that it's rare to find one that focuses on new vinyl: most sell predominantly secondhand albums, and stores that sell no new vinyl at all are far easier to find than stores in which even half the stock is new.

Record buyers who are serious about music are basically obliged to look at secondhand sources in addition to new. There is a huge supply, particularly in relation to the number of people actually buying, and many albums that can be found easily will never be available new.

The article is a bit misleading in that respect, because it gives the impression that new pressing plants are new turntable products are at the forefront of a rebirth. In fact, while the new vinyl market may be growing (but note the absolutely tiny number of vinyl units sold - less than a million in a country of 120 million), it is driven by the fact that while new records disappeared almost completely a few years back, continued ownership of records didn't, and nor did the secondhand market. And there was always new playback equipment readily available. Without all that, there would be no revival at all.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Forget about the vinyls, Nagaoka the company that were marketing the needles are already out of business and are only selling the ones that were in storage.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Lots of 2nd-hand Vinyl stores around, same with Needles (might need to hit a high-end store Vs BIC Camera/etc.

Still reckon Vinyl has the best Sound Vs the cleaned up/sterile CD sound.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Forget about the vinyls, Nagaoka the company that were marketing the needles are already out of business and are only selling the ones that were in storage.

That's irrelevant for any record player that doesn't require a specific manufacturer's stylus (you probably mean cartridges anyway). In other words, most players. The only difficulty I've ever encountered in fitting a cartridge to an arm was finding a short headshell for a Japanese player, which took some hunting, and I eventually bought from outside Japan. The cartridge and stylus were never an issue, and are not for most players.

This is one reason why record players from the 1960s and even from the 1950s are still in use today. Even "broken" players are often easily brought back into working order. An advantage of older units, some of which can be picked up for pocket change, is that many of them were once pricey products with workmanship to match. Something that probably doesn't apply to the player in the picture above, which looks less like a real player and more like a machine for buggering up records.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Something that probably doesn't apply to the player in the picture above, which looks less like a real player and more like a machine for buggering up records.

It looks like a Numark USB one designed to convert records to MP3 files. So indeed, "buggering up records".

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I love records and still buy them but so many sound like crap or are too quiet these days because the mastering is done by people who don't know how to master for vinyl (which is different than cds). Looks like Sony may recognize this and is bringing in older engineers to teach the CD mastering techs how to do it properly.

Also, you have to sort of wonder with new records what the point is unless the bands record to tape. If they record digitally (like so many metal bands recently) and press to vinyl that "warmth" everyone seems to love kind of goes out the window.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If music is recorded at fully analog studio, then it sounds much better even after digitization. This is why old albums sound so good and natural, they are just recorded properly from the beginning. I also love vinyl and even bought a new AT turntable model last year.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

DJ's are a big driving force for Vinyl too come back.

Myself got over 500 45's and around 700 LP, love them some I got over 40yrs ago.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@ Triring

"Forget about the vinyls, Nagaoka the company that were marketing the needles are already out of business and are only selling the ones that were in storage."

loads of good needles around depends on ya decks though.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I brought my records from home ( and packed my turntable for the plane, too).  Remember AAD? Now it will be reversed to DDA.  That's so ridiculous.  Tom waits recorded a double album completely analog from the start.  But even Neil Young gave up on analog recording.  It's too expensive and time consuming. And you gotta be a real old artist to endeavour it...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Well as a nostalgia entertainment it is okay but vinyls are too prone to fungus, mold and dust attack, let alone scratches that produces very annoyance sound rendering the record useless. By far I would prefer magnetic reel-to-reel tape.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites