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Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts dies at 80

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By JILL LAWLESS and GREGORY KATZ

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Thank you Mr Watts, for your great work in this world.

21 ( +21 / -0 )

I've got a two-hour practice session scheduled for this afternoon. Will work on my paradiddles in tribute to one of my drumming heroes. RIP, Mr. Watts..

11 ( +11 / -0 )

The end of an era. Without Charlie, there is no Rolling Stones. Rest in peace.

17 ( +17 / -0 )

RIP Avuncular Charlie Watts, the best dressed man in rock and roll . Years ago while doing low budget traveling I heard a tale from a fellow traveller who'd run into him at an airport luggage carousel somewhere in Europe, and Mr. Watts while tending to his own bags, still had the decency to spend a few moments and chat. 

I had always thought he would be the last Stone standing. His drumming drove the world's best-ever rock and roll band.

15 ( +15 / -0 )

There never was a better drummer, there never was a cooler guy. He was the calm and beating heart of the Stones, the anchor for all the flash and drama happening around him. A committed musician, band member and true professional. And in the middle of all that craziness that is/was the Stones, he stayed married to the same woman for 57 years, which goes to show what kind of a man he was. I dunno how the Stones survive the loss of this man. RIP Charlie.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

I listened to Paint it Black today in memory. Hell of a drumbeat for that time.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Rock and Roll lives where drummers and bass players breathe. Thank You, Mr. Watts

10 ( +10 / -0 )

A true legend and the end of an era. The Rolling Stones really started the day he joined the band.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

The end of the Stones, it's about time..

Everything has its end..

Rest in Peace..

And for the others, rest in retirement..

-14 ( +2 / -16 )

Great Photograph

Good bye and thanks for all the beats.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Well, now when we hear thunder, we'll know one of those helping to make it...sad news for many Boomers...

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Awesome guy, great band. He will be missed.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

The news of his death momentarily blew Afghanistan from my mind; just hours before while driving I was listening to his drumming on "Sticky Fingers". Charlie always got the respect he deserved and the Stones won't roll any more without him. From one of his obits I learned of his strange hobby of collecting cars which is par for the kind of English eccentricity money can buy. A good bloke - RIP.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I like the stones but not a BIG fan. I used to drum in rock and Cajun-Zydeco bands, but I’d could never put Mr. Watts up there with Keith moon, G. baker, Bill Ward(B Sabbath) Neil Pert, Roger Taylor(Queen). Steady, reliable, very talented YES. But “one of the greatest”? I could be wrong, and I’m sure the stones fans will let me hear it.

Anyone couldn’t ask for a better life. Congratulations Mr. Watt, you are in the history books for the rest of humanity.

-12 ( +0 / -12 )

Sad news but we all knew that we would be soon start losing the Stones, time catches us all eventually...

Thanks for the great music, you will be missed!

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Legend.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Married to the same woman since 1964 when he could have easily had multiple 'upgrades'. Says a lot about him.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Saw the Stones in Seattle a while back. He was the main focus for long periods of time during the 3 hour concert. Great drummer.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

I like the stones but not a BIG fan. I used to drum in rock and Cajun-Zydeco bands, but I’d could never put Mr. Watts up there with Keith moon, G. baker, Bill Ward(B Sabbath) Neil Pert, Roger Taylor(Queen). Steady, reliable, very talented YES. But “one of the greatest”? I could be wrong, and I’m sure the stones fans will let me hear it.

You're looking for musicalonanismdiscussoin.com.

And if you're going to include Rush's dearly departed drummer in that list, get his name right.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

What a legend. RIP.

(I wouldn't say his playing was "muscular". It was more an understated sophistication happy to stay at the back)

7 ( +7 / -0 )

None of us are getting any younger, but his death caught me by surprise. From "not going on tour this year" to checking out permanently is one helluva jump. Still, rest in peace.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

And if you're going to include Rush's dearly departed drummer in that list, get his name right.

I’m probably one of the biggest RUSH fans in Japan. I did get his name right, it was just mispeeled.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Thanks for the memories.

Rest In Peace.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Love the fourth picture. Who here is old enough to remember when skinny leather ties were all the rage?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

concerned citizen:

Married to the same woman since 1964 when he could have easily had multiple 'upgrades'. Says a lot about him.

I agree. Don't know why anyone would down-vote you. That's what I call love, dedication and loyalty. A big contrast to both Mick and Jerry. I wonder whether the cancer just got to be too much in the end.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Hope the Stones will finish their American tour. I think Charlie would have wanted that.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Cool guy, great drummer. Loved his unpretentious manner. While Mick was pouting and strutting he looked like he thought Mick was being a bit of a knob.

@Fizzbit

Charlie Watts didn’t do 20-minute drum solos with huge kits with the Stones because that’s not what they did. He did have the ability to turn his hand to a variety of styles. He once said that drumming for the Stones was his ‘day job’ as he pursued other musical projects. Excellent musician according to his peers.

One of the coolest dressers I’ve seen.

Class act.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

This is such sad news beyond belief. I first saw the Rolling Stones on the 'Bridges to Babylon' tour in 1997 and they were on a stage setup Charlie designed himself. I grew up in Generation X with Duran Duran, Genesis, Def Leppard, U2, Ramones, Cheap Trick, Bon Jovi, ZZ Top, Kool and the Gang, Ziggy Marley, Nirvana, Mellencamp, RUSH, Springsteen, Metallica and more - and the Rolling Stones. They are a foundation to everything, so far-reaching. Even more influential than Bowie, NY Dolls, Roxy Music. The Stones, man! 

I have seen most of the stars and bands I have listed above and I have seen the Stones twice. They transcend generations, and I've seen people of all colors, races, etc. at their shows. Rock'n'roll unifies us all. The Stones explicitly express the white and black American roots that combined to create the music, and it's universal now. 

A Rolling Stones concert is a practical rite-of-passage. Mick's snarling vocals and his body language, Keith's guitar riffs and his chain smoking, Ron's guitar (and electric sitar) playing, Charlie bashing the skins puctually. Mick shouts out, 'Whooooo!!!!!!', Charlie slams the drum. Mick shouts out, 'I say "Whooooooooo-oooooohhhhh!!!!!"'. Charlie slaps the crap outta that drum again. 

zichiToday  07:40 am JST

A true legend and the end of an era. 

Sad to say, it certainly is. This is the most jarring saddest rock'n'roll tragedy since Prince if not before that (Bowie's passing was a sudden smack in the head as well). Although Eddie Van Halen's passing last year was a shocker and that meant the end of a band forever.

This isn't the end of the Rolling Stones yet but the clock is ticking. If you haven't seen them yet I highly recommend it.

As Tears Go By, I Can't Get No Satisfaction from this terrible news. I've seen the Stones twice and Charlie is essential. Recently this week we lost Don Everly, and the sax man from UB40 a band I grew up with and love very much. And recently tragedy hit ZZ Top and Kool and the Gang, two other bands I grew up, dig and have seen perform. Those latter two bands I saw in 2019. 

Pandemic or no, it's a very bad day and I just want to Paint It Black. War, children. They took the drummer away. I want to hide Undercover. I'm Sad Sad Sad.

RIP in Rock'n'roll Heaven, Charlie. We Love You.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Ringo Starr, Phil Collins, Neil Peart, Tommy Lee, Alex Van Halen, Richie Ramone, Marky Ramone, Jack Bruce, Nick Mason, Rick Allen, Larry Mullen Jr., Manu Katche, Frank Beard, Max Weinberg, I've seen all of these excellent drummers and other ones too but Charlie Watts stood out from the rest. Not only was he an influential rock drummer but he was an accomplished jazz drummer too. When the other Stones did their solo projects there was the Charlie Watts Orchestra, a Big Band setup that got critical acclaim.

kohakuebisuToday  09:06 am JST

What a legend. RIP.

(I wouldn't say his playing was "muscular". It was more an understated sophistication happy to stay at the back)

Neil Peart was the drummer and lyricist for RUSH. That's a major factor in making that band as special as it was in the first place. That's why when he lost his 4 year battlev with brain cancer we all knew that was the end. Sometimes 'staying in the back' is more essential than you might think. And not everyone can be the frontman or would even want to. Charlie said he just wanted to play drums and he did so. He followed his muse which was music and even if he wasn't in the limelight so much, he didn't seem to mind. Some people like it better that way. And it's more than OK.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@jimizo

thanks.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Famous people either die from undisclosed health issues or COVID-19!!!!

kind of strange.

-10 ( +0 / -10 )

RIP Mr. Watts.

How the hell did Keith Richards survive him?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

TheDalaiLamasBifocalsToday  12:22 pm JST

RIP Mr. Watts.

How the hell did Keith Richards survive him?

Don't you know that for every cigarette you smoke God takes an hour off of your life and gives it to Keith Richards?

And BION, both times i've seen the Stones in concert Mick Jagger generally smoked one cigarette altogether and he swigged Michelob beer. Mick drinks Mich!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Definitely a decent musician all around, he wasn't my favorite drummer, wasn't technically proficient outside of his typical rock genre, but the man did play some memorable tunes and will be remembered as a legend in the field which he was so famous for. RIP Carlie, you will be missed.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

A sad loss

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Definitely a decent musician all around, he wasn't my favorite drummer, wasn't technically proficient outside of his typical rock genre

He was an excellent jazz drummer.

Why do you post these things?

14 ( +14 / -0 )

A self-effacing man, not an egoistic bone in his body.

Charlie Watts presence will be missed.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

For fans, there are some great photos of Charlie and the band in The Guardian. The shot of Charlie as a 2-year old with his mum and dad in London is not to be missed. You can see where he got that face from...

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/aug/24/charlie-watts-a-life-in-pictures

And for those surprised to learn of Charlie's interest in thoroughbred horse breeding (I certainly was) I love the headline in horsetalk.co.nz -

"Arabian horse breeder, Rolling Stone drummer Charlie Watts dies at 80"

https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2021/08/25/arabian-horse-breeder-rolling-stone-drummer-charlie-watts-dies/

4 ( +4 / -0 )

"Wasn't technically proficient outside his typical rock genre"

Maybe you should listen to his jazz albums and the eulogies that say he was a master craftsman of his trade.

And most importantly, he was a true gentleman.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

He famously clobbered Mick Jagger with a right hook, when Jagger called him up at 5 in the morning, demanding 'My Drummer' comes to the studio.

Charlie turned up later, hit him, and shouted back, 'You're My Singer!'

His jazz background gave the Stones music a unique swing to it, as he varied the tempo ever so slightly.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

bass4funk

Definitely a decent musician all around, he wasn't my favorite drummer, wasn't technically proficient outside of his typical rock genre, but the man did play some memorable tunes and will be remembered as a legend in the field which he was so famous for. RIP Carlie, you will be missed

for someone who claims to be a musician you seem to know so little about Charlie Watts. A versatile and accomplished drummer of many genres. He said the Stones was his day job but when he home it was all about Jazz. He had his own Jazz band too. You embarrass yourself.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Charlie Watts and his Jazz band Tentet often played at the famous Ronnie Scots Jazz Club in London.

https://www.discogs.com/Charlie-Watts-And-The-Tentet-Watts-At-Scotts/release/450218

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The single B/W photo, the couture, the titfer, the suit, single buttoned.

The tie, It speaks a hundred words without forming a single sentence.

A heartfelt condolence, Charlie Watts family.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

A real gent, and a great drummer too. RIP. What a sad day.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

And still, the man who fell out of the coconut tree remains.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

He was an excellent jazz drummer. 

I disagree, decent, but not excellent, but music is subjective, but I do respect the man.

Why do you post these things?

I'm a musician, that's why.

for someone who claims to be a musician you seem to know so little about Charlie Watts.

You have the slightest idea who or what I know

A versatile and accomplished drummer of many genres. He said the Stones was his day job but when he home it was all about Jazz. He had his own Jazz band too.

You embarrass yourself.

Not at all. I just disagree with you completely.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

bass4funk

you are entitled to dislike anyone you want to. Yes, music is subjective but it's also more than that. Certainly, more of a successful drummer than you are a bass player.

But the statement you made is 100% incorrect.

"wasn't technically proficient outside of his typical rock genre".

A very successful Jazz player which is another genre. He was also successful with the blues genre. A very talented and capable musician, composer and producer.

He was also a fine artist and painter. His illustrated children’s book Ode to a Highflying Bird, about the life of Charlie Parker.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

you are entitled to dislike anyone you want to. Yes, music is subjective but it's also more than that. Certainly, more of a successful drummer than you are a bass player.

Successful as in popularity, yes. But there is nothing he could throw out on drums that I couldn’t follow, meaning, he was decent and I have indeed watched the man, but I don’t find him musically challenging in the realm of jazz.

But the statement you made is 100% incorrect.

Not in my professional opinion.

A very successful Jazz player which is another genre. He was also successful with the blues genre. A very talented and capable musician, composer and producer. 

Most musicians compose and produce, the revenant ones particularly.

He was also a fine artist and painter. His illustrated children’s book Ode to a Highflying Bird, about the life of Charlie Parker.

I have no opinion or knowledge of paint and artwork, duly noted.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

But there is nothing he could throw out on drums that I couldn’t follow

You've backed one of the most successful bands in history? I think not. You aren't even playing the same game, much less the same league. Good luck following that one.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

You've backed one of the most successful bands in history?

I never implied that I did. But whatever he can spin on the drums I could follow, his technique is not that hard to follow or keep up with technically. That’s not a knock on him, he was a very good musician, but definitely not the best whether in Jazz or rock, but for what he did in his nich, he was pretty good.

You aren't even playing the same game, much less the same league.

You never heard, see me perform, know what I look like or my musical and media background, you don’t know anything about me. I’m just stating my musical opinion of the man, that’s all.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

never implied that I did.

You attempted to even presume you're playing the same game:

there is nothing he could throw out on drums that I couldn’t follow

You know, other than backing one of the most successful bands in history.

But hey, to be fair, he, and indeed few others, will never live up to your ability to be hyper-partisan on the internet. So you've got that.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

You attempted

No, I already explained that part already.

one of the most successful bands in history.

Hmmm. I disagree

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

No, I already explained that part already.

You think you explained that.

Hmmm. I disagree

Fifth most popular artist of all time: https://www.businessinsider.com/the-100-most-popular-rock-bands-of-all-time-2018-9

Or maybe you don't like popularity as a metric. Then how about fifteenth best selling artists of all time: https://www.businessinsider.com/best-selling-music-artists-of-all-time-2016-9

Yes, go ahead and disagree. Guy on the internet.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

You think you explained that. 

Not think

Or maybe you don't like popularity as a metric.

Wrong again

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

Or maybe you don't like popularity as a metric.

Wrong again

Oh, so you DO like popularity as a metric. Well then we're both in agreement, and since the Rolling Stones are the:

Fifth most popular artist of all time: https://www.businessinsider.com/the-100-most-popular-rock-bands-of-all-time-2018-9

And since we're both in agreement that popularity is a good metric, you've in fact been proven wrong when you said:

I disagree

In regards to the Rolling Stones being:

one of the most successful bands in history.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

What a great man, dry as toast and cool as. Thanks for the music Mr Watts.

Bass, will you ever take a day off? You berk.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Charlie Watts for more than 50 years was out there making his music while others are here making posts claiming to be his equal. Sad to fill this thread with those.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

RIP.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Charlie Watts for more than 50 years was out there making his music while others are here making posts claiming to be his equal. Sad to fill this thread with those.

(Sniffs) He didn't play in 34/5 time with multiple polyrhythms going on and he didn't even have a huge crash cymbal which he would smash in a masculinely animalistic fashion. Some drummer (sniffs).

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Oh, so you DO like popularity as a metric.

Not always

And since we're both in agreement

We’re not.

In regards to the Rolling Stones

Not the Stones as a group, Watts.

What a great man, dry as toast and cool as. Thanks for the music Mr Watts.

Bass, will you ever take a day off? You berk.

Not a berk, just expressing my opinion and for the record as a band I like the Stones, saw this twice. Never said one bad thing. But I’m not going to pretend from a musical and Jazz perspective that the man was that great, I just don’t think so, that is my belief and I respect the name deeply as a rock artist, but I’m not going to lie to make a few people feel good. Not my style. Again, deeply respect the man, great loss. But what I said, those are my feelings as a musician and I have to right to feel and express them.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

@Bass

You said he wasn’t technically proficient. That’s an incredible handicap for a professional musician.

Are you technically proficient?

I wonder about your claims to being a top class musician. Your metric for judging musicians seems to be how complex their playing is. This isn’t necessarily how you do it. I can copy the notes BB King played but I can’t play them like he did. I can sing and play ‘What’s going on’ by Marvin Gaye, but I can’t sing it the way he did. I definitely can’t come up with that songwriting or playing.

Anyone who’s ever sung or picked up an instrument knows this.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

You said he wasn’t technically proficient. That’s an incredible handicap for a professional musician.

Are you technically proficient?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Not a berk, just expressing my opinion and for the record as a band I like the Stones, saw this twice. Never said one bad thing. But I’m not going to pretend from a musical and Jazz perspective that the man was that great, I just don’t think so, that is my belief and I respect the name deeply as a rock artist, but I’m not going to lie to make a few people feel good. Not my style. Again, deeply respect the man, great loss. But what I said, those are my feelings as a musician and I have to right to feel and express them.

There are many good and great drummers out there and they become great by technique and inspiration from those before them. Charlie was great, he played jazz and applied it to rock. That inspired many rock drummers, a lot. The same way Phil Collins is now cited as an inspiration by the Foo Fighters drummer and Neil Peart also inspired later drummers.

Charlie was one of the first of the most important rock drummers, no doubt about it. The inspiration and legacy rolls on. And so it goes.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

JimizoAug. 25  02:53 pm JST

Definitely a decent musician all around, he wasn't my favorite drummer, wasn't technically proficient outside of his typical rock genre

He was an excellent jazz drummer.

Why do you post these things?

Yes. Jazz is a root of rock'n'roll and other great rock drummers like Neil Peart, Phil Collins and even Ringo Starr have experimented and/or played jazz. And whether you think Charlie is one of the 'giants' or the 'greats' just remember - the Rolling Stones made a far-reaching influence but they have their roots too. And everything starts somewhere at some time. Charlie Watts' playing may be 'simple' by some standards today but he inspired other drummers himself. And sometimes that is more than enough to be great, and he was great. Rock'n'roll has lost one of the best this week.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The sudden news of Charlie's demise probably came as a bit of a shock to many since we're more used to rock stars passing prematurely owing to drugs, sex and rock 'n' roll. This time it's different: his death is a wake-up call to those approaching two score and ten and those already there in the waiting room that "time is on my side" no longer. The takeaway for all of us is surely, "DON'T WASTE TIME"!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Charlie Watts' playing may be 'simple' by some standards today but he inspired other drummers himself. And sometimes that is more than enough to be great, and he was great. Rock'n'roll has lost one of the best this week.

Again, there is the implication that more complex equals better. I’ve seen Neil Peart’s drum solos with enormous kits - it looked and sounded like meandering showboating to me. No disrespect to an obviously gifted drummer, and I’m sure Rush fans enjoyed it. Could Charlie Watts have done that? Possibly, I don’t know. I wouldn’t have paid to watch it.

Give me Charlie’s drumming on Gimme Shelter any day of the week.

I don’t agree fully with the idea of ‘it ain’t what you do, it’s the way that you do it’, but there is a lot of truth in that.

I can play guitar to a point. I can listen to a lot of genres. There have been a lot of guitar players who’ve been inspired by BB King and taken music into new areas. Some would say progressed.

If I could have the guitar skills of any guitarist in history, it would still be BB King and I’m not a huge blues fan.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The same way Phil Collins is now cited as an inspiration by the Foo Fighters drummer and Neil Peart also inspired later drummers. 

That is not entirely true, Peart's biggest mentor was Buddy Rich and although he was indeed inspired by some drummers in later years, he was heavily influenced by more of the heavier Jazz and drum legends like the late Bruce Carter

Charlie was one of the first of the most important rock drummers, no doubt about it. The inspiration and legacy rolls on. And so it goes.

I disagree, but again that is subjective.

Rock'n'roll has lost one of the best this week.

I'm not sure about all that, but the world has definitely lost a true legend, that cannot be disputed.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Most of the posts are dignified but there's always one or two.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

zichiToday  12:52 am JST

bass4funk

you are entitled to dislike anyone you want to. Yes, music is subjective but it's also more than that. Certainly, more of a successful drummer than you are a bass player.

But the statement you made is 100% incorrect.

"wasn't technically proficient outside of his typical rock genre".

More proficient than most. He was a foundation for future even more innovative drummers who built on what he did.

Give me Charlie’s drumming on Gimme Shelter any day of the week.

'Paint It Black' has some serious slamming there. And have you heard some later Stones songs, like 'Undercover' from 1983, 'Too Much Blood' from 1984, and 'recently' 'Look What The Cat Dragged In' from 2005? Charlie gets mighty ferocious on those numbers, lots of booming and complex percussion up the yinyang. He could get mighty fierce when necessary. Besides, many of the best and most energetic Rolling Stones songs start off with Charlie bashing a cymbal just before Sir Mick starts snarling his lyrics in his usual cocky demeanor. And we all love it. Wouldn't have it any other way ; )

A very successful Jazz player which is another genre. He was also successful with the blues genre. A very talented and capable musician, composer and producer.

The Charlie Watts Orchestra was a critical fave for fans of the Big Band genre. Charlie did that when the other Stones did their solo projects.

He was also a fine artist and painter. His illustrated children’s book Ode to a Highflying Bird, about the life of Charlie Parker.

I have seen a few paintings he did and they are pretty good. John Mellencamp also paints on the side and one of his CDs features them, and he gets critical acclaim. And whatever our opines about ex-Pres. W (Bush 43), credit must be given to his paintings as well - yes, Virginia. He's pretty good at it, too.

>

0 ( +0 / -0 )

More proficient than most.

I disagree especially if you are talking about the Jazz genre.

He was a foundation for future even more innovative drummers who built on what he did. 

Again, I vehemently disagree. Again, he was decent, I’m not taking anything away from him, I have quite a few Stone albums, but he was nowhere near as Jazz proficient of drummers such as: Max Roach, Billy Cobham, Peter Erskine, Harvey Mason, Buddy Rich, just a few of these extra ordinary talented and influential Jazz drummers that defined the very essence of Jazz drumming.

He was also successful with the blues genre. A very talented and capable musician, composer and producer.*

He was a good composer, I will give him that and NO ONE can take his place with the Stones that is obvious. He defined a lot of their sound.

The Charlie Watts Orchestra was a critical fave for fans of the Big Band genre. Charlie did that when the other Stones did their solo projects. 

Well, the Big Band was again a bit more different, watched it, enjoyed very much, but again, not on that level of Jazz, contemporary or even fusion.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Certain people just have no decorum.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

bass4funkToday  06:47 pm JST

More proficient than most.

I disagree especially if you are talking about the Jazz genre.

*He was a foundation for future even more innovative drummers who built on what he did. *

Again, I vehemently disagree. Again, he was decent, I’m not taking anything away from him, I have quite a few Stone albums, but he was nowhere near as Jazz proficient of drummers such as: Max Roach, Billy Cobham, Peter Erskine, Harvey Mason, Buddy Rich, just a few of these extra ordinary talented and influential Jazz drummers that defined the very essence of Jazz drumming.

Charlie wasn't exactly trying to top buddy Rich and the jazz pros. He was playing for a fairly nascent mishmash conglomerate of black and white musical styles that is rock-n-roll. Rock'n'roll is not jazz, not country, not blues, not folk, not bluegrass, not gospel but all of these things, yet none of them. When the Stones got together in the early 60s there were already pioneering guitarists like Chuck Berry and Dick Dale, keyboardists like Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis, singers with iconic images (did somebody say 'Elvis'?) so it would be only a matter of time before there would a certain drummer or two would become the foundation and inspiration for future 'timekeepers' to come. And that honor goes to Charlie Watts and maybe Ringo Starr too. Neither one of them were 'musical gods' so to speak but everything starts somewhere with something. And future rock drummers like Peart, Collins, Mason, Weinberg would cite this as an inspiration.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Charlie wasn't exactly trying to top buddy Rich and the jazz pros.

He couldn't.

He was playing for a fairly nascent mishmash conglomerate of black and white musical styles that is rock-n-roll. Rock'n'roll is not jazz, not country, not blues, not folk, not bluegrass, not gospel but all of these things, yet none of them. When the Stones got together in the early 60s there were already pioneering guitarists like Chuck Berry and Dick Dale, keyboardists like Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis, singers with iconic images (did somebody say 'Elvis'?) so it would be only a matter of time before there would a certain drummer or two would become the foundation and inspiration for future 'timekeepers' to come.

I agree, I do give him his just respects for sure in that regard.

And that honor goes to Charlie Watts and maybe Ringo Starr too. Neither one of them were 'musical gods' so to speak but everything starts somewhere with something. And future rock drummers like Peart, Collins, Mason, Weinberg would cite this as an inspiration.

That much I wouldn't disagree with at all in that respect.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

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