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String quartet performs with instruments made from tsunami debris

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Personally, I find this to be in very poor taste. They are showcasing and making money from the worst natural disaster in Japan’s recent history.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Classic for Japan foundation ….. Inspirational…

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=ja&u=http://classic-for-japan.or.jp/tsunami_violin/&prev=searchClassic

Some background. If this does not translate…original site…

http://classic-for-japan.or.jp/tsunami_violin/concept.php

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Coincidentally, I was just looking at photos of the tsunami aftermath this afternoon. Two days ago I finished reading Richard Lloyd Parry's 'Ghosts of the Tsunami' - an essential but gruelling read. I wasn't sure how I felt about this project (not that how I feel about it is in any way important) but then I read that all profits made from the concert given in Melbourne in March by violinist Kana Ohashi, playing the "miracle pine"violin, went to the Rikuzentakata city scholarship program, helping students with financial difficulties continue their studies. Same applied to one in Vienna in June.

Not sure whether that applies to all profits from all concerts, but at least reading about those two gigs made me feel pretty good about the motivations of the Project.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

did this actually help victims or rebuilding of the affected area, or did it just "pass on feelings"?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Highly radioactive objects showing that radiation doesn’t have any effect on humans or their next generation is good news. Radiation has never killed anybody in japan, we should encourage tourism to the high radiation ares. Music is a good way, and eating Fukushima food.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I hope that all the participants offered and devoted their time voluntarily.

Unfortunately passed mistakes, political or otherwise cannot be rectified by defining the Tsunami Violin Project motivation from a purely finical perspective.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Highly radioactive objects showing that radiation doesn’t have any effect on humans or their next generation is good news. Radiation has never killed anybody in japan, we should encourage tourism to the high radiation ares. Music is a good way, and eating Fukushima food.

I couldn't tell you were joking or being serious.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Bass, I hope he was joking. Just to crazy to be serious. I find the violin project a little odd but the best violins were made from pine soaked in salt water. So as long as the proceeds go to helping the victims I'll describe is as odd but useful.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What stuns and moves me about this project is the ingenious ways that artisans and artists find to create something divine from monumental tragedy and use it to do good.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

philly1Today 12:42 am JSTWhat stuns and moves me about this project is the ingenious ways that artisans and artists find to create something divine from monumental tragedy and use it to do good.

that's kind of how I feel about it. Instead of disposing the materials like rubbish, they made instruments from it. In a way, it's like 'picking up the pieces' and going on in a funky odd sort of way. Maybe strange perhaps, but yeah - I think this project is doing some good. Now some people who want to play some music can have some 'hardware' to do it. Making something positive out of the 'scraps' from a disaster or bad situation - nothing wrong with that in my book. It's a unique way to express survival, that we're 'movin' on', all that jive.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Perhaps each concert should also start with a short preface about how all the money donated globally to aid in the disaster has been fully spent (and wasted), how most of the people are still in shelters (and very little progress has been made) - but hey, who cares...it's all about Tokyo 2020 now.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

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