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U.S.-born singer Chris Hart obtains Japanese citizenship

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I love him. He's got truly beautiful singing voice.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

So how does this work? He has to apply for ESTA too when he returns to the U.S.?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

What happened to Jero, , "a U.S.-born singer known for his covers of Japanese pop music"?

8 ( +8 / -0 )

@DaDude: I suspect he got Japanese citizenship under the condition he renounce his American citizenship so would be subject to the same requirements as any other Japanese citizen when entering the USA.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Can he vote?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

All japanese citizens can vote.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Japanese entering USA. If permanetry want to stay, you get three years green card if your spouse is American. Work permit green card is for five years.US and Japan has ifferent immigration laws.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

So how does this work? He has to apply for ESTA too when he returns to the U.S.?

At the moment, he'll still be American. You can't renounce citizenship until you have a new one. So he's a dual citizen now.

The question is whether he'll ever renounce his American citizenship. I've heard that it's a little known secret that many who convert don't ever renounce their original citizenship. I'm not sure how true that is, or to what degree. I've also heard that Debito never renounced his.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

If you stay USA citizen, they'll track you down for taxes no matter where you live! Many Americans are renouncing citizenship lately because of the ridiculous tax system.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

He will just keep a dual nationality and no authority will do anything about it. Leave on Japanese passport arrive with American one.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If you stay USA citizen, they'll track you down for taxes no matter where you live! Many Americans are renouncing citizenship lately because of the ridiculous tax system.

Yes, I think it's a stupid system, only the U.S. and Ethiopia have this system. On the other hand, I would never give up my U.S. citizenship as much as I hate this system. But if Hart's happy, good luck to him.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

For Americans living abroad at least 330 days of the year, the first $100,000 or so of income is tax-free. Anything on top of that is taxed by the US government also. It's called the Foreign Income Exclusion (I think form F2555). Been filing it every year since I've been here...so far, the IRS hasn't come for me....and I promise to release my tax forms sometime in the future.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

One guy at the office is a naturalized Japanese. He said that now according to Japanese law, you have to provide proof within 2 years that you have renounced your former citizenship or you loose your Japanese citizenship. So he will have to renounce US citizenship if he is serious about Japanese citizenship. However, there seems to be a loophole for people who are born with dual citizenship somehow.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Green cards are good for 10 years.you can't be a dual citizen.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I've also heard that Debito never renounced his.

He did. He's a close personal friend of mine.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

iraira wrote: "For Americans living abroad at least 330 days of the year, the first $100,000 or so of income is tax-free. Anything on top of that is taxed by the US."

That's EARNED income as in salary. Pension payments are UNEARNED and so are not eligible for the exemption. That makes it possible for a fixed-income pensioner to pay US taxes while a salaried person "earning" several times as much pays nothing.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

All readers back on topic please. Mr Hart stated the reasons on his blog.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

All readers back on topic please. Mr Hart stated the reasons on his blog. stated reason doesn't mean its the only reason.

Moderator: It's good enough for us and readers as well.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

You can't be a dual citizen in Japan if you are over 22 years old. He will have to renounce his US citizenship.

Do you still have to change your last name to kanji?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

“I thought I wanted to deepen my ties with Japan to convey my appreciation for Japan,” he wrote on his official blog, saying his life changed dramatically after meeting music friends and his wife in the country.......

Chris Hart clearly feels naturalization is step worth taking, under Chris circumstances. Home is where the heart and the career is. All the best to Mr Hart. By the way, I had to provide evidence that I had relinquished my UK nationally, passport etc

I wish could echo Chris Harts sentiment. However even though I have settled in well, enjoying life in Japan immensely. Senior Family members, Uncle, Aunts, and Grand Parents etc, wished I had remained in the UK and have requested I do not attend family functions.

My English upbringing has clashed with a rigid family hierarchy, especially my views on business,and cultural female gender roles that Grandparents described as my selfish obsession with western materialism. I have also found it increasingly difficult to accept my families suffocating patriarchal social structure that refuses to tolerate anything other than the status quo, particularly when it comes to suggesting higher education opportunities for cousins at Universities outside Japan.

I would personally recommend caution before taking the important decision to change or relinquish ones nationality. Bridges burned are anything than straight forward to rebuild.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

You can't be a dual citizen in Japan if you are over 22 years old. He will have to renounce his US citizenship. yes true, and with the US taxe system it just makes it that little bit easier to renounce US citizenship compared to other 1st world countries, especially if your a high income earner, like Mr Hart

2 ( +3 / -1 )

You can't be a dual citizen in Japan if you are over 22 years old. He will have to renounce his US citizenship.

Yes IN Japan. However it is a well known fact that many people simple keep their second passport without renouncing their prior nationality. (I'm speaking about in general, not just US ones)

(Eg using their Japanese passport to enter and leave Japan, and using their home countries one to enter their home country)

However, while IN Japan, Japan will only recognize your only one nationality (Japan for legal purposes). You cannot claim consular protection etc .

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If you stay USA citizen, they'll track you down for taxes no matter where you live! Many Americans are renouncing citizenship lately because of the ridiculous tax system.

I know an American who hasn't filed/paid US taxes for about 20 years. Still has a current US passport. Apparently they don't track you down.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I bet he still gets carded by the po-po. How would that go down?

Po-po1: Let's see your registration card. Chris: Oh, I'm Japaneseだよ!  Po-po1 and 2 look at each other for a moment, laugh Po-po1: No, seriously. Show us your registration card.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

In USA, people who qualify to. become US citizen s take citizenship test and become citizen, many areas have ceremony for new citizens. Can't say same in Japan

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I have a variety of friends that permanently live in foreign countries. It works for them, much like our ancestors when they left their counties. That is my rule of thumb, if it works, it is probably right for the person. Same with changing citizenship, or having dual citizenship. Their business, none of mine.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I've been living in Japan since 2008, and I tryied to apply for naturalization in 2015, and surprise, I'm aparently not yet elegible until this year, because I commited the crime of getting my college degree in Japan, if they don't tell me I'm still not elegible for bullshit reasons.

Also I must point out that for most of my stay I've been in 1 year status that I must renew every single year. The longest stay permission I ever got was of 2 years when I was in college, and that is just because it was aparently the minimum for my status at that time.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Actually, Japan does not call citizen, Japanese word is Kikajin. Nippon Kokumin for native and NipponkokubKikajin. That follows discrimination. Least you can is changing your names in Japanese.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Good luck to him! I don't particularly like the songs, but he's talented and seems like a nice guy.

They should get him to sing the Japanese national anthem at a sporting event, like the Olympics. You know, that "diversity" thing they are trying to promote. It would be infinitely preferable to some enka singer who hangs out with yakuza.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I love him. He's got truly beautiful singing voice.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So there anyone here that was granted citizenship in 6 yrs? You need to have Japanese reading and writing skills at least equivalent to an ordinary 7 to 8 year old Japanese primary school student. You need to understand basic "kanji" besides "katakana" and "hiragana". You need to be able to have smooth Japanese oral communication or have money to bypass this criteria.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Green cards are good for 10 years.

Permanent residency, aka a green card, is permanent, not 10 years. The card itself has to be renewed periodically, but the status does not.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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