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Canadian YouTuber explains why she quit working on Japanese TV

76 Comments
By Corey Gold, RocketNews24

Many foreigners living in Japan would love to become famous on Japanese TV. But according to one popular foreign YouTuber in Japan the reality of appearing on television is far from glamorous. Micaela has told her 271,000 followers in a frank YouTube video that she was exploited by TV producers and has subsequently “quit Japanese TV”.

The Canadian born YouTuber has been living in Kyushu for around 10 years uploading hundreds of videos about Japan before she joined a “talent agency” for Japanese TV appearances. But as Micaela explains in the video she was very disappointed with the way she was treated.

You can see Micaela’s breakdown of her experiences of Japanese TV in the video below.

Micaela says the TV producers she worked with were always keen to usurp her followers that she had garnered over many years on YouTube but they offered almost nothing in return except for the chance of more exposure. She says she had “tons of TV offers” but “not one of them paid” – even though they were always pressing her to share her appearance on TV to her followers on Twitter and YouTube. In fact, she ended up losing money by appearing on TV because she had to reduce her English teaching classes to find the time in her schedule. Micaela tells us that she believes YouTubers appearing on TV “deserve to be compensated for [their] work”.

Not only was she not getting paid but the one thing they did offer wasn’t all it was cracked up to be. Micaela says, “being on TV has never brought me more traffic than being linked on another blog”. She advises other YouTubers that it is best to collaborate with someone or organize someone to write about your website, which will “definitely get you a lot more traffic than appearing on TV”.

Micaela is also critical of the way TV producers tried to portray her on screen. They were constantly trying to tell her to be more excitable. For one television shoot Micaela gave a report of a local convenience store. “The whole time we were doing this shoot he was just like can you just be more excited… smile more, be more energetic,” says Micaela. The final edited product of the shoot included a narration describing Micaela’s thoughts – a lot of which the producers made up without asking for Micaela’s permission. Micaela says the producers would often “give me a personality that is not mine”.

Micaela says she was constantly being told that she was less valuable than the other people working for her talent agency and that she needed to be aware that she was at the bottom of the food chain behind the “trainees”, “models”, “talents”, “personalities” and “celebrities”.

Here are some reactions to Micaela’s video:

“This is a kind of slave labour.” “As an illustrator I can relate to so many of these points!” “I love you for this video. I always knew that you were an intelligent person. You are one of my favourite YouTubers.”

Micaela does however qualify her opinions of her experiences with Japanese TV by saying ultimately the TV industry wasn’t for her and that others may be different from her and may be willing to put up with the negatives if they really want a career in the Japanese media.

You can check out more of Micaela’s videos on her YouTube channel Micaela ミカエラ.

Sources: Buzzmag, YouTube/Micaela ミカエラ

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- 5 Japanese women who can kick your ass (in martial arts) -- Sex doll idol singer’s public debut draws a shocking yet sane number of fans -- One man’s mission to record the stories of Tohoku survivors “revisited” by lost loved ones

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“The whole time we were doing this shoot he was just like can you just be more excited… smile more, be more energetic,”

Please be more gaijin, be more crazy and especially SHOUT more like atsugiri Jason and our audience will fall from their chair laughing. That's all the Japanese TV wants foreigners to do, act weird and funny. ugh

35 ( +39 / -4 )

Japanese TV, like so many other Japanese institutions, is dying because it is dominated by an out-of-touch clique of old-timers at the top who have protected themselves by sheltering their whole industry from outside competition. They're in for a rude awakening.

32 ( +39 / -7 )

The whole time we were doing this shoot he was just like can you just be more excited… smile more, be more energetic,”

Same thing with the Eikaiwa and ALT industry.

Please be more gaijin, be more crazy and especially SHOUT more like atsugiri Jason and our audience will fall from their chair laughing. That's all the Japanese TV wants foreigners to do, act weird and funny. ugh

If you're white yes. If you're black they want you to act like an ape like Bobby was made to do. If we did that to them in our countries, we would be accused of racism. Which is exactly what was going on here.

27 ( +32 / -5 )

Years ago after the birth of my 2nd child, a local station wanted to do a spot on international marriages with kids.

I was asked and a full day and another half was spent following us around in the house, going to the park, shops etc. Also many interview style questions about me, us, Japan etc. Lovely, friendly crew - nice guys.

The hours of film was edited into a 10min piece on a popular local wide show. Surprise, Surprise!

Not one of my try-hard-to-speak-Japanese bits was shown. Everything was dubbed over in comical Japanese. A Japanese friend who watched the program said they made me sound like a "country hick", probably because they thought my antipodean accent sounded like someone from the Ozarks. I recall a big "Ehhhhhhh!" in the show was the focus on me cooking (peeling potatoes & carrots actually) and washing / drying dishes, took over 2mins of the 10mins. And the lady "talents" were squealing and "いいな-ing"

I wasn't upset over the prog.at all, but understood how false tv is first hand. Essentially little of value was reported and it was just a "fun" piece - which is what they wanted from the start. Naive me thought it was a bbc style doco - ha, ha. I met the "director" again when he called on us to give us a video of the event. He was really nice - but a bit embarrassed. I'm sure his senior producer boss had different ideas to his.

Of course all of this is probably consistent the world over, just the emphasis here is different - more focussed on titilating with the banal.

As Katsu said - easy to see why tv is dying.

21 ( +23 / -2 )

I'm an American.... and I've never seen any TV programming in the USA where a foreigner, new to the USA, was filmed as a segment for a TV show. I've seen some movies, mainly comedies, like Coming to America, which were fun to watch, but nothing else. My point being.... why are the Japanese so curious as to how foreigners cope when living in Japan? And it is constant. You can barely go a week or two without some mockumentary on a foreigner living in Japan or a Japanese living in a foreign country. Why? To me, programs like this only help to solidify the foolish idea that the Japanese are vastly different than the rest of the world. I'm sorry to inform them but... they're not... yes, a different culture but all cultures are slightly different and that makes them the same.

15 ( +18 / -3 )

No pay? Sounds like slavery. But at least Japanese are trained for it from the beginning so it is widely accepted.

14 ( +17 / -3 )

@Browny1

this is probably consistent the world over

On one level, of senior producers putting their own spin on existing footage, I would agree this probably happens everywhere. And of course, every country has prejudice and media bias against foreigners.

However, the treatment of non-Asian foreigners in the Japanese media as some kind of comedy clown for the amusement of the watching public is quite specific to the culture of Japanese TV stations and it in turn reflects the culture of the Tokyo-educated elite. The culture of treating long-term foreign residents as exactly the same as fresh-of-the-boat arrivals, and denying them any stake in or connection to Japan, pervades politics, advertising agencies, newspapers and to a lesser degree, the local bureaucracy (where lovely individuals prepared to treat you as a human being and help you out can sometimes be found).

You describe how they edited out your personality to fit a foreign stereotype. Micaela also describes how her personality was taken away and replaced.

I lived in three countries for years and spent more than six months in another two. I've not seen anything in modern times that parallels this elsewhere.

Sure, we can look at this without any wider perspective and say that the director is just trying to make a fun TV show that will keep his audience engaged. But I think the reasons for the treatment that you and Micaela experienced go deeper than that.

The 'gaijin treatment' one gets from regular people in Japan is a distilled version of the concentrated version show on TV. In other words, the media plays a key role in setting the tone and parameters of how foreign residents are treated. This is particular true given the countless hours many Japanese households still spend watching TV, despite the rise of online media.

The media lead the way, drip by drip, in removing serious consideration of long-term foreign residents as proper stakeholders in Japanese society.

I watched Micaela's video all the way through and it is fascinating. If she put up a version with Japanese subtitles I think it would go viral and could perform quite a useful service in alerting members of the Japanese public to the distorted way in which foreigners are shown on screen (although to be fair, I guess some people might take the TV with a pinch of salt and be aware of this already).

13 ( +14 / -1 )

I have met a few producers here. They are creative in the same way beige walls are creative. One guy was telling me about a new band idea he had, which sounded like every other Jpop band idea I have ever seen while here. It was creative only in the extent that it had a new name. I would not let that guy touch my creative work as it would be instantly infected with mediocrity and mainstream beige-ness.

What is worst is that he was constantly asks why I wasn't more "genki" or more energetic. "Are you sure you are American? You seem more quiet and maybe European." What? I don't know where they get this idea that all foreigners behave as if they are on four types of illegal stimulants and laughing gas all at once. But even when trying to place voice over for corporates I often hear that the person didn't sound genki enough.

As long as Japanese producers expect foreigners to behave like hysterical morons on speed, then they will chase away all the truly talented personalities and be left with only the sheepish, hard up people who are willing to compromise who they are to fit some idiotic stereotype some producer who has never left Tokyo thinks is representative of the western person.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

Not one of my try-hard-to-speak-Japanese bits was shown. Everything was dubbed over in comical Japanese. A Japanese friend who watched the program said they made me sound like a "country hick", probably because they thought my antipodean accent sounded like someone from the Ozarks. I recall a big "Ehhhhhhh!" in the show was the focus on me cooking (peeling potatoes & carrots actually) and washing / drying dishes, took over 2mins of the 10mins.

It's incredible really. You've given them this wonderful opportunity, and instead they turn around and try to force you back into the box they've painted for themselves by editing and doctoring to fit their narrative.

Disgusting.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

katsu78 is exactly right. The lengths they go to protect themselves from outside competition is abhorrent and also counter-productive to much needed progress here. Once again, Japan shows the 'small man' side that is so fiercely kept out of sight.

The Japanese business model is to exploit all that is possible, use underhanded tactics if necessary - just don't get caught. Foreigners and Japanese alike know to expect no quarter in this country, decency is usually a facade hiding something else more sinister - especially in the business world. This article highlights the some of the general attitudes here in Japan.

Michaela did well to walk away from this, and I hope she gains more respect from her fans for speaking out about the illusion that Japan is some magical place of unicorns and (genuinely) happy people. Most people who this underbelly don't have the luxury of speaking out about it due to fear of reproach. Spitefulness being another common Japanese quality...

10 ( +16 / -6 )

She has it wrong, the problem is the talent agencies took all her money not the TV show. Unless you are in the audience you are going to get paid something, the talent agency in this case took all of the money... she was most likely sold on "we get the money, you get famous" ... and she ate it.... This is VERY common in Japan.

The other issue, if you are trying to get subs from going on TV that isn't going to work. TV is a different market, it would be like saying I'm going to sell fruit in front of walmart and hope people come to my fruit store... people watch TV because it's there, not to learn about the people on it (most of the time).

9 ( +11 / -2 )

She's more naive than the people watching her YouTube channel. No one held a daikon to her head to do these, and someone was getting paid for every appearance on TV.

And

Wow, somebody's full of herself. She's a great poster child for 2016.

Proves my point that everything, anything, and everyone will always be derided on JT.

How dare this girl be unhappy about not getting paid for work. Talk about full of herself. Who expects to get paid for working on 2016?

9 ( +14 / -5 )

this would end a lot faster if foreigners had a zero tolerance for all the stereotypes and were unwilling to sell out themselves no matter the situation and just stand up and walk out.

After those who start seeing what's going on and move on, it simply never gets any better because there's always a newbie ready to do anything they want

This is a situation we're perpetuating

9 ( +12 / -3 )

I'm not defending the TV studios, but the excuse "nobody mention these TV interviews are not payed" is just bad business. I thought it was common sense in business that you don't agree to anything without knowing all the details!

But to be fair, I once interviewed with a Japanese big company that had this "We're the cream of the top of the industry, you're lucky if we're willing to pay you a salary of 2.4 million a year, many would work for less just to get an entry in their resume, accept or get the hell out, we don't need you" Aura.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Due to Japan's somewhat unique position in the world for the last 50 years, it has mainly done things internally with not much outside/international imput or output. Thus I think their extremely apprentice / master relationships to everything work related, also have not changed much with the times. Even when I see a Convinience Store worker being trained on the job it's so obvious from across the store who is the apprentice. In Japan they want you to not only be a beginner, but to adopt a humble almost child like stance when you begin a line of work. Anyone who enters any work of any kind, if they come across as not humbling themselves to the level of a total beginner who's eager to learn will be labeled as a troublemaker. The only way out of it is to be introduced as an expert by another Sempai, in which case you will not have to mutter fake astonishment at the maturity and talent of whomever expert was able to make a schedule for your day at work.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

I had this Japanese student who wrote an essay about how foreigners should behave in Japan. She supposedly won an award for it. And I was really interested in reading it until she was telling me, a teacher, to be more energetic and clown-like at the Open Campus for my school. Of course I am always friendly and full of smiles for new prospective students. I'm actually that way with all of my students. But there's a borderline between being naturally excited and crazy excited. And unfortunately many Japanese have a stereotyped idea of this "crazy" foreigner image.

I really understand what Micaela says about people trying to “give me a personality that is not mine”. Good on you, Micaela.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

OK. I guess this is a rare thing. I have been on J-TV about four or five times. Did some modelling and other spots too. I finally said "enough is enough" when Waratte II tomou wanted me to drop my whole life and do several shows for them.

The whole thing is dumb. People just seem to expect that everyone is so star struck and excited to be in front of a camera that they will do anything. A lot of eikaiwa teachers have that personality, though, so I guess it is a pretty fair bet for the producers to make that assumption. The money is bad. The people are bad. The expectations are idiotic. All the incentives are wrong. It is a complete waste of time. Forget about owning anything.

Now I can really see a youtuber going up against that culture and hitting a wall. If you really stop to think about it, Japanese TV is everything that youtube isn't, which is actually a horrible indictment of Japanese TV. People can produce better stuff for youtube with zero budget and zero staff than FujiTV can do with millions. And let's be clear that the TV people were desperate when they got this Canadian unknown to work with. They are fading fast.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

I used to do occasional work as an extra on TV, films etc. While it was somewhat novel and interesting at the start, I quickly became aware of how terrible the industry is here. Sometimes jobs were easy. You'd be in and out in an hour or so. Sometimes though they would be seemingly endless. On one NHK drama we spent about 16 hours on set. We had to fight with NHK management to get extra pay and a bento. I did several episodes of Aibou as an extra. We were treated fine, but the Japanese extras were all unpaid and were told to walk to the nearest station while we were bussed to and from. Eventually though the deteriorating conditions and low quality of the finished productions allowed me to decide that this was not worth one more minute of my time. I did several days shooting on a drama called "Japanese Americans". The director was a complete a-hole. Slightly bigger than average Japaneae guy who used his size and bark to bully everyone. He'd even physically shove people around. Saw him shove an almost elderly woman around where he wanted her placed on set. Absolute talentless scumbag. The finished show was so laughably bad that he wouldn't have a job in film and TV outside of Japan. Thankfully, I didn't rely on that job, but some do. I feel sorry for them.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Wow! They were telling her to act all excited in a conbini? She has been living here for 10 years! What's so exciting about a conbini? My friend, who came over this summer was awed when she stepped in my local FamiMa but it was her first time in the country. It's true that they have this misconception here in Japan, that all foreigners are loud, ignorant people who cannot speak Japanese. Even if they are long-term residents. I had friends telling me to go to an agency and get on Japanese TV because I am a blonde white person yadda yadda yadda but I am sure I would straight up quit after a week especially if they wanted me to speak broken Japanese, which I refuse to do. Might as well rip my JLPT N1 into shreds!

8 ( +9 / -1 )

The final edited product of the shoot included a narration describing Micaela’s thoughts – a lot of which the producers made up without asking for Micaela’s permission. Micaela says the producers would often “give me a personality that is not mine”

Oh but this also applies to all of those "COOL JAPAN" crap shows, it's so sad how they try to brainwash the monolingual japaneses that's funny sometimes.

american guy: hmm, nice idea, I think I've never seen these before

japanese captions: OMG!!! THIS IS OUT OF THIS WORLD!! YOU CAN'T FIND THEM ANYWHERE ELSE, JAPANESE ARE VERY CLEVER!!

7 ( +9 / -2 )

I can relate. I've had Japanese clients, not in TV, who have expected me to do work duties for free on a regular basis, like hang around their offices during the business week to answer any questions they might have on projects unrelated to me and for no compensation.

Most did not stay clients for long. I assume their Japanese contractors don't stand up for themselves, or something.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

Well, she qualified it at the end with the "maybe it's just not for me', so I'd say it's pretty objective. More than anything she's saying is just be aware of what you're getting into, and don't be afraid to get out.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

The Net has long been eating print and traditional broadcast media's breakfast, lunch and dinner. While canny advertisers snipe at niche online demographics, the clueless shotgun ever-distant TV and print audiences.

TV directors, who 'own' relationships with major brand's ad buyers (chaperoned by Dentsu or its competitors) propose content that follows comfortable, unchallenging, ratings-eliciting formulae to risk-adverse suits who only dream of retirement. A tired old dog chases it tail, worn-out sticks are slapped, revenues decrease, navel-gazers ruminate, and costs are trimmed.

Many successful scams rely on the mark's greed to succeed. Micaela's director used her YouTube followership as bait for advertisers, and TV exposure as bait for her, just as I've seen directors over-promise and under-deliver exposure for sponsorship in the form of free meals, accommodation, or use of premises.

My J-TV director clients of old were myopic, bullying parasites with the ego of John Ford but the mindset of Henry. I'm well shot of these morally bankrupt, intellectual midgets, and advise everyone to steer well clear.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

@bullfighter: thanks for listing three white people on TV who are fluent in Japanese. I don't think this counters the endless stream of using non-Asian foreigners used as buffoons and foils for uncritical praise of Japan, all the while highlighting differences, minimizing similarities, and generally portraying an us-versus-them landscape to the viewer.

But are the three guys you list treated as regular guys, really as fully paid up members of Japanese society? Pakkun and Dave Spector particularly are regularly shoe-horned into explaining the differences between Japan and the rest of the world, and have not, for me, completely escaped performing monkey status. (Fair play to the analyst for being able to command a position on TV that does not involve discussion of foreignness per se, but isn't he just in the long tradition of the 'paid foreign expert'. I wonder if he has any clout, influence and position within the TV station hierarchy? Is he a permanent employee of any Japanese organization that will give me a good pension. I hope so!)

Turning to their fluency in Japanese, then, does this really allow these three integrated status? I don't think so. Fluent non-Asian foreigners are not allowed to enter society in an unqualified way. They remain foreign, and as 'anomalies' within the foreign community due to their fluency. This is why people say 'wow, your Japanese is better than Japanese people', etc., to fluent foreigners.

What I mean is this: when the pervasive stereotypes are challenged by fluent non-Asian foreigners, Japanese people do not allow you to cross the invisible wall to become just a regular dude. Rather, a new 'anomaly' box within the foreign community is created, and you are put in there. Think of it as a neat little Venn diagram.

Learning Japanese, naturalizing, appearing as one of the tiny handful of 'non-clowns' on TV. None of it is enough to remove the stigma of being a foreigner in this caste society.

Anyway, I'm a little surprised to find you defending the practices of the TV companies. What do you think about the way Micaela was 'given a new personality?'. This to me is a far more interesting topic than whether she deserves to get paid or not. I mean, taking an individual and then manipulating their appearance on TV to fit your preconceived notions of how all members of her race should behave is pretty behavior obnoxious, is it not? And you must know that is not an isolated example; it's more or less the default position for how many Japanese people treat any white/black foreigner they are meeting for the first time.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

When it comes to "exotic" non-Japanese celebrities and aspiring TV talent in particular, the Japanese TV industry is run with a hostess club mentality. The same applies to AKB47-type girl groups; and yes, often even to English conversation teachers to a large degree.

Micaela’s example of being told to act like she was awed by the convenience store bentos was one good example — titillating the audience by catering to their preconceived notions about what foreigners ought to find impressive about Japanese culture. Its a continually repeated worn out script, but it never seems to get old, particularly among Japan's older generation.

Also, I always have to laugh at how they parade famous foreign celebrities visiting Japan out in carbon copy press conferences, and at the voices used in dubbed foreign movies. The Japanese voices of the female characters are invariably high-pitched and excessively "girly" while those of the male characters are at the opposite extreme, gruff and excessively "manly." Very few are portrayed with what I would consider to be a normal sounding Japanese voice, and most often the voices they use don't match the character.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

titillating the audience by catering to their preconceived notions about what foreigners ought to find impressive about Japanese culture. Its a continually repeated worn out script, but it never seems to get old, particularly among Japan's older generation.

And it is not just minpo channels. NHK World is full of that stuff all day long. Gradually it makes both foreigners and Japanese culture itself into cliche and all ripe for spoof or satire. The big difference is that NHK World has pretensions that its audience is foreign. Otherwise I agree with you, Sensato and you, jpn_guy.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

I can't imagine talent agencies book tv appearances and don't receive payment themselves? Why in the world wasn't she being paid?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

This young lady was VERY SMART to ditch j-tv, be very thankful you didn't get sucked into that world, as it clearly sucks!

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Though I have no connection with the entertainment industry in Japan, none of this surprises me--katsu78 and thepersoniamnow have summed up why and it's found in all industries across Japan.

But chopping up interviews and personalities to fit a scripted narrative happens anywhere. I got interviewed by a local paper here in the U.S., and was shocked to read the final article made me sound like a totally different person. You have to make everything more exciting or outrageous in order to gain readers/viewers--Japanese TV is no different, except that people labelled "foreigners" have to display enough "hijoushiki" (lack of Japanese "common sense") to provide the comic relief from routine Japanese middle-class lives.

Japanese husband agrees this media trend seems to show Japan won't be accepting foreigners as legitimate members of society anytime soon.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Good luck Micaela,

I think especially in Japan this is true: 'If you do something well, never do it for free.'

4 ( +7 / -3 )

There's also the fact that there's never anything negative said about Japan. Part of the whole "Be more excited, smile, blah blah blah" is making it appear that all foreigners love Japan unconditionally. Japan has many great features, but by never allowing any negative speech about it during their programming, everything they say feels fake (because it is.)

4 ( +7 / -3 )

@sf2k

I'd never work in that industry again here. It was only ever occasionally for me anyway.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The media still aren't interested in foreigners as ntelligent beings with any type of life,other than over exuberant clowns. I was cornered flying into KIX by a film crew this month and the same old boring typical questions came out! What do you do in Japan?Oh wow,can you speak Japanese?What business are you in? Where are you from?

After the fourth rather banal question I had to tell them that I was late for my next connection and had to go.

The interviewer gave me one of the stoniest stares I've ever had in Japan as I made my exit with a polite 失礼します!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Keep expressing yourself through your Youtube channel. It is the your channel so you have complete control and freedom. It's too bad that you lost income but bad experience is still experience so you can walk away with.

Your YouTube channel is amazing!

Keep it up!!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Thankfully I'm not photogenic so the cameras at the airport always look for the pretty people lol.

Back on topic and if I was ask to act excited at the sight of a combini bento by a TV company I would politely say no. I have that little spark of self respect still within me. I made a vow never to make a fool of myself in public.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Maxjapank: "But there's a borderline between being naturally excited and crazy excited. And unfortunately many Japanese have a stereotyped idea of this "crazy" foreigner image."

That's why Atsugiri Jason, or whatever his name is, was so successful.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

How dare this girl be unhappy about not getting paid for work. Talk about full of herself. Who expects to get paid for working on 2016?

If you do work with the expectation of not getting paid, you can't blame others for not paying you.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Michaela is lacking the awareness of how money can be made from TV broadcasting.

A understanding about prospects to income., Talent agencies insipidly view that talent work for the agencies not vice versa. Michaela most valuable asset is the international reach of her blogging community. It is a question of how to turn that into business.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I have a feeling the King of the Weab, Victor, is going to make a video ranting about her....

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Anyone know how much programs here pay for an appearance? Years ago, I recall chatting with a model for life drawing class during break and she mentioned being on Oprah. The show paid for her flight and hotel room, maybe a meal, but no compensation for her appearance. She was a guest on the show about women who hook up with their children's friend and I guess she was skewered as she got a bit teary-eyed as she recalled her time on the show. She didn't hate on Oprah, though, as Oprah was doing what she had to do. By the way, I do realize members of SAG are paid scale vs the regular Joe off the street. Similar operation here?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Judging by some insider's comments here, it seems that J-TV is not much different to the porn industry...

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Eventually it's all boiled down for being aware, know your contract and always surround yourself with people you can trust. In Hollywood as I know hundreds of peoples hoping to make it big but because of bad contract and wrong connections some of them just give up.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I lasted 2.12 minutes.

I generally don't like listening to people who talk about themselves for more than about 30 seconds....

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I like Micaela Braithwaite, I am a year or so older, our opinions differ, but I find Micaela's attitude to life inspiring and am impressed with Micaela's work ethic. Japanese TV has been a negative stoney ground experience, Micaela's had the initiative to walk away.

If Micaela's is motivated by wealth then lobby commercial enterprises for direct sponsorship. All the best.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That a talent agency is trolling YouTube talent for broadcast TV (and the TV stations are lapping it up) is an indictment on the current state of the television medium. TV is rapidly reaching irrelevancy with more people switching to online streaming every year.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Indian-Canadians are 'East Indians'.

Had never heard this bizarre moniker until I was on a bus in Seattle, and some random asked a Sikh guy if he was 'East Indian'. The Indian guy had no idea what he was getting at, but the guy pressed his line of questioning, so knowing my geography and wanting to end the confusion I eventually informed the guy that he is a Sikh, so technically North West Indian. The guy looked at me like I was mad. 'North West Indian?! Ha! What, you think he is a Haida?!'

Eh?

After a bizarre and bewildering exchange, he eventually righteously informed me that a West Indian lived in the Caribbean and an East Indian came from India.

I deduced he himself was from Absurdistan.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I've rarely seen anyone on TV just act normally. It's a given that everyone has to be overly excited

1 ( +2 / -1 )

...Who?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Bit of a connendrum here imo as youtube competes with tv and it's in no one's interest (certainly not tv) to promote youtube channels and risk losing even more viewers.

French prankster/youtuber Remi Gaillard faced the same problems 10-15 years ago (on a much bigger scale obviously) and complained french tv didn't pay much, if anything, yet had no problem stealing his ideas for their new shows. Plagiarism, exploiting 'talent' etc and tv go way back am afraid, this young canadian youtuber isn't alone.

Great story browny, had a good chuckle.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I am sure many Japanese and Chinese watch long duck dong on sixteen candles and wonder "why do they think all Asians wear glasses and act like morons?"

0 ( +5 / -5 )

"... unfortunately many Japanese have a stereotyped idea of this "crazy" foreigner image."

Very true. That's why I killed my neighbours' cat and wore it as a hat to a wedding.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That's why Atsugiri Jason, or whatever his name is, was so successful.

@smithinjapan

Good example. Obviously Micaela's producers were looking for a much more overblown performance that fits their image of what all foreigners are supposed to act like.

The producers obviously seek something more along the lines of Atsugiri Jason, who plays the over-the-top gesticulating foreigner stereotype to great fanfare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u44nj0ckVRc

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Leigh

you allow the perpetuation of their behaviour by engaging in it. If you never worked in that industry again, could you?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

TV is dying everywhere You Tube is getting bigger world wide. She just wanted fame in japan and she hasn't master You Tube with what she's learned in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

today ever TV company uses you like that; as customers are so much demanding, so every advertiser uses advertising companies like that too; so if you are wise never enter these two fields, though supposed to be some 'great' jobs, in fact you just get downgraded much earlier than you expected. anyway i am sorry how you were treated, just today 'greed' rules the mind of every business outfit. indeed a truth.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Japanese TV offered her exposure but did not pay. She was not happy. YouTube offers her exposure but does not pay. She is happy.

You are misinformed. Youtube pays about 1$ of ad money per 1000 views. Too much in my opinion, considering that most popular youtube channels are not any better than TV quality-wise.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Younger generations tend to watch YouTube or anything via internet rather than TV.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

After years of living in Japan and agreeing to be on tv non paid many times, and she doesn't like it, umm..

0 ( +2 / -2 )

My two years on Japanese TV were similar in the sense that the pay was terrible. However, unlike this woman, I was given tremendous freedom to design, edit and "star" in my show. My producer trusted me and set me free....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You can actually earn fairly well on YouTube, know a few people who upload local racing, etc news and get paid for it. Not sure if it depends on subscribers or views if Videos.

Self-starter books are available here, same for other local Docs sites

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Had never heard this bizarre moniker

That's why I put it in quotes. But I was told in Canada it was to differentiate from the natives, who used to be called Indians.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nothing bizarre or self-righteous about it. In some parts of the West Indies (Trinidad for example) over a third of the population has its roots in India. "East Indian" avoids confusion if ethnicity is at issue.

Otherwise you get confusion: "Asian" means Pakistani etc. in Britain but Japanese etc. in America.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Bullfighter: have you actually worked in anything related to the Japanese tv industry? Your making all these assumptions about what it's like but I bet you would last or want to work in any area of that seedy seedy business.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My husband works in the TV/ movie industry here in Japan. I don't know very much about it, but for sure I understood that there's a lot of company who aren't serious and go on just exploiting boys s d girls like this girl, so you need to watch out.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

why are the Japanese so curious as to how foreigners cope when living in Japan?

I'm sure the answer is a similar reason as to why they ask foreigners "Do you like Japanese food? Is it better than Korean or Chinese food?".

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@kurisupisu

Ah yes the camera crew clowns. Probably another group to avoid if we were making a list of stereotype-rs

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Can someone please define 'integrated' for me? I keep hearing talk about how foreigners are not and cannot integrate, but without a definition of what this means, it sounds meaningless to me.

I mean, even in other countries I've lived in, people's race/nationality are always mentioned, unless they are white. Japanese-Americans are not just American, but Japanese-American. Indian-Canadians are 'East Indians'. For that matter, the indigenous people in most countries have that designation put upon them. So if acknowledging race/nationality means one is not integrated, is there any country in the world that has integration of the minorities in that society?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Judging by some insider's comments here, it seems that J-TV is not much different to the porn industry...

So, how's the porn industry these days, AgentX?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@Bullfighter hit the nail on the head. On all points.

All the righteous indignation on this thred is really funny. And pathetic.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Break out the world's smallest violin and play me a sad melody...

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Someone is being exploited? This kind of thing must only happen in Japan.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

they offered almost nothing in return except for the chance of more exposure. She says she had “tons of TV offers” but “not one of them paid”

OK, this is her main complaint.

The Canadian born YouTuber has been living in Kyushu for around 10 years uploading hundreds of videos about Japan

How much does she earn from the videos which she uploaded to YouTube? Isn't YouTube exploiting her in much bigger scale than Japanese TV?

Japanese TV offered her exposure but did not pay. She was not happy. YouTube offers her exposure but does not pay. She is happy. I am wondering what the difference is.

-10 ( +3 / -13 )

She's more naive than the people watching her YouTube channel. No one held a daikon to her head to do these, and someone was getting paid for every appearance on TV.

What a completely self-absorbed social media princess...

-11 ( +12 / -23 )

Er... was she forced to appear on Japanese TV? Bit confused about that.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

These youtube bloggers are sure full of themselves. Some of them think they are A list Hollywood celebrities fer crying out loud.

How about getting a real job instead of complaining about making videos.

-18 ( +4 / -22 )

Ahhh, poor thing! It's awful that the mean tv people only wanted to pay her what she was worth!

-22 ( +4 / -26 )

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