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In water-stressed Singapore, a search for new solutions to keep the taps flowing

5 Comments
By VICTORIA MILKO and DAVID GOLDMAN

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With no natural water resources

We cannot say "no" natural water resources and then go on to list the range of water sources, including 17 reservoirs. It rains a lot. We can accept it is water-stressed, mainly because of the demands of business. The people are continuously implored to reduce personal consumption but "no water resources" are places in deserts.

And climate change, which brings increased intense weather, rising seas and a rise in average temperatures, is expected to exacerbate water insecurity, according to research done by the Singaporean government.

Given they are water-stressed they surely have an existential interest in performing such research. It will not be some "sky-is-falling-in" scare story, as the deniers frequently claim it all is. Perhaps they can email the Singapore government and tell them how mistaken they are, perhaps with their own research from the internet.

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To help build people's confidence in the safety, Singapore’s national water agency collaborated with a local craft brewery to create a line of beer made from treated sewage.

I can just see the advertisement tag line: "It's what's in the water that makes it yellow" O_O

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The Israelis have perfected affordable desalinated water. I am very surprised that Singapore has not jumped on the bandwagon. They are on the ocean, so no shortage of sea water, and they have the money to invest in the technology.

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Maybe if they didn't try to cram even MORE people into that tiny island, the locals would have more water.

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The Israelis have perfected affordable desalinated water. I am very surprised that Singapore has not jumped on the bandwagon. They are on the ocean, so no shortage of sea water, and they have the money to invest in the technology.

Um, did you even read the article? From the article above:

"Across the island, seventeen reservoirs catch and store rainwater, which is treated through a series of chemical coagulation, rapid gravity filtration and disinfection.

Five desalination plants, which produce drinking water by pushing seawater through membranes to remove dissolved salts and minerals, operate across the island, creating millions of gallons of clean water every day."

The Israelis have not perfected anything. They accept the high energy costs, high cost per liter and offshore dead zones from the highly concentrated brine and pollutants in the desal plants outfall. There are better, less costly and less energy intensive ways to make potable water. Purifying waste water to a potable standard is currently the preferred technology producing perfectly drinkable water for about half the cost per volume of desalinated water.

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