environment

New Zealand's southern waters experiencing marine heatwave

7 Comments
By Lucy Craymer

Waters around New Zealand’s South Island are as much as 6 degrees Celsius (42.8 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than normal due to climate change, the weather phenomenon La Nina and a series of high pressure systems, according to scientists.

Metservice oceanographer Joao de Souza, who is part of the Moana Project, said that waters around the southern South Island were all well above normal for this time of year with temperatures in Fiordland 6 degrees warmer than normal.

The Moana Project said that water temperatures on the West Coast of the South Island are currently 4 degrees above average.

These temperatures are going to have significant consequence for an eco system that is built or adapted to cold waters, he said.

"There are always going to be winners and losers," he said, with those marine species that can't shift location likely to be more impacted.

New Zealand saw a number marine heatwaves last year with a previous heatwave in Fiordland resulting in severe bleaching of native sponges. There have also been anecdotes of species more common in warmer waters of New Zealand being spotted further south.

De Souza said their research showed that it was not just surface water temperatures that were rising but also water as deep as 100 meters, which meant the marine heatwave was impacting species who lived in deeper water.

The marine heatwave comes as a La Niña weather pattern has caused warmer than normal temperatures in New Zealand's South Island. This along with high pressure systems and climate change were factors in the heatwave, said de Souza.

He added that they expected marine temperatures to remain above normal until at least April.

© Thomson Reuters 2023.

©2023 GPlusMedia Inc.

7 Comments
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again.

climate change.

change enviroment for climate change.

you wrote all time about same topic-what enviroment???

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Call a spade a spade; it is Global Warming, not climate change.

If half the Earth were cooling, while the other half were warming, then the term climate change would be appropriate. That is not what is happening. Everywhere on Earth is seeing annual temperature increases.

The term Global Warming may be scary to use, but it is accurate.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Call a spade a spade; it is Global Warming, not climate change.

Except you didn't call a spade a spade, it's climate change. It's why we see stronger storms and weather events, not just heating. That's why the scientists, who study this stuff, switched from using the term global warming to climate change.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why not Environmental Change!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That's why the scientists, who study this stuff, switched from using the term global warming to climate change.

That's not my understanding. We used to hear the term Anthropogenic Global Warming (APG) from scientists. But some would doubt the "warming" bit if their local temperatures got colder, and so I think it was the not-so-scientific who introduced the term Climate Change.

The climate is always changing. But the man-made contribution is what is of concern. I prefer the term global warming to climate change, but I think APG is better still.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That's not my understanding. We used to hear the term Anthropogenic Global Warming (APG) from scientists. But some would doubt the "warming" bit if their local temperatures got colder, and so I think it was the not-so-scientific who introduced the term Climate Change.

Nope. The term first was coined by a scientist in 1975:

To a scientist, global warming describes the average global surface temperature increase from human emissions of greenhouse gases. Its first use was in a 1975 Science article by geochemist Wallace Broecker of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory: "Climatic Change: Are We on the Brink of a Pronounced Global Warming?"1

Link: https://gpm.nasa.gov/education/articles/whats-name-global-warming-vs-climate-change

The National Academies are were pushing the term in 2005:

The National Academies are nongovernment, nonprofit organizations that were set up to provide independent scientific and technological advice to the U.S. government and nation. The National Academies includes three honorary societies that elect new members to their ranks each year—the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine—and the National Research Council, the operating arm that conducts the bulk of the institution's science policy and technical work. The Academies enlist committees of the nation's top scientists, engineers, and other experts, all of whom volunteer their time to study specific issues and concerns.

An organization of scientists.

Link: https://www.preventionweb.net/files/2276_climatechangefinal.pdf

And why they aren't interchangeable:

Global warming refers only to the Earth’s rising surface temperature, while climate change includes warming and the “side effects” of warming—like melting glaciers, heavier rainstorms, or more frequent drought. Said another way, global warming is one symptom of the much larger problem of human-caused climate change.

https://www.climate.gov/news-features/climate-qa/whats-difference-between-global-warming-and-climate-change

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Strangerland,

I don't strongly disagree on this, and I agree they aren't interchangeable. I can understand that climate change is a result of global warming, and it is those changes that will affect us. But climate change can result from other factors. Your last link included this:

Climate change, on the other hand, can mean human-caused changes or natural ones, such as ice ages.

I think it is the human-caused changes that are of concern. And those are mainly from global warming caused by human activity - Anthropogenic (man-made) Global Warming ( AGW - sorry about my earlier errors with the initials). As many will say, the climate is always changing. But is it not the warming caused by human activity that is the focus of current concerns?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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