Take our user survey and make your voice heard.
environment

World could save 700 mil tons of CO2 if people cycled more, study shows

27 Comments
By Patrick GALEY

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© 2022 AFP

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

27 Comments
Login to comment

Yep, but most people are too lazy

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

As with many solutions to the climate crisis, cycling is a simple win-win-win solution.

A healthier, eco-friendly, cheaper option.

Now we just need "leaders" to help make cities more cycle and walking-friendly and less car-friendly.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Even better, simply eliminate the use of all electricity and ALL products derived from petroleum! Let's just go back to the way of life people enjoyed ~1850. The Amish can do it! (aka Pennsylvania Dutch). No electricity, no motor cars(or airplanes). How many "Green/Eco" warriors (politicians/celebrities First!) would actually be willing to do it? Be honest!

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

Even better, simply eliminate the use of all electricity and ALL 

Increase the use of bicycles is no where near as difficult as stopping the use of electricity, there is no real comparison between both things.

Governments can make decisions that would promote the use of bicycles without too much disruption, after all it is not like benefits would only appear if everybody without exception commuted exclusively by bike.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

And get people to stop buying those gas-guzzling SUVs. Most of the time I see these things there's only the driver inside. They're terrible for the environment, and more deadly to pedestrians.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Cycling in the UK is like painting a target on your back. And there are few safe places to stash your bike wherever you go. Post-Brexit, bike theft is one of our few growth industries. You can't carry much on a bike, certainly not a typical shop. And you wouldn't want to be doing it in the showery weather the UK still gets, or the heat waves that now pepper the year. Most roadways can manage vehicles and pedestrians. Sharing pavements between cycles and people/mums with pushchairs/mobility vehicles is a disaster (and doesn't win plaudits on here when it gets mentioned). Cycling on roads is suicide. Elderly and disabled people have trouble on bikes, and you can't transport your drunk friends home on one.

Instead of coming up with idiot schemes of everybody doing this, that or the other, just integrate better solutions where you can, and promote them. behaviour changes, but it doesn't happen overnight.

If we had more honest/competent politicians, we would have started all of this many decades ago, reduced our impact, and rebuilt our infrastructure to cope better with climate change by now.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

The Japanese actually utilize walking, cycling, and trains as their main transportation method for commuting to work. The times cars are in use are when they need to move their family around because it is dangerous to have kids ride bikes on these small roads with crazy drivers and lack of cycling lanes. Taxis probably account for nearly half of the cars driving around Tokyo, with half of those empty. Construction cars (Hi-Ace), trucks, salesman (eigyou-sha) cars, and realtor cars account for most of the cars driving around during the week. Not to mention it rains frequently here.

We would need to rebuild the entire infrastructure in Tokyo to accommodate a cycle friendly environment. It is a shame too because you can get around Tokyo with just a bicycle pretty fast.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

but most people are too lazy

More like, most authorities and corporations have anti-cycling policies. There are no dedicated cycling lanes where I live in Tokyo, even though at any given time, there are more bicycles/cyclists on the streets around the station than any kind of commuter or pedestrian. parking spaces are insufficient. All my neighbors have 2 or 3 bikes per household. We are the most numerous, yet we get the fewest space and facilities and the least amount of consideration.

I've never had an employer with a shower and changing space for cyclists. They give out train passes but no bike subsidies. And so on, and so on.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

I cycled to and from the train station for months a couple of years ago as part of my commute.

In summer I'd be absolutely drenched in sweat every morning when I got to the station. I basically needed a shower and to change clothes. In winter it was OK, just needed a scarf, but no matter the season I was almost being run over by buses, taxis, work trucks and "luxury" cars five days a week.

Bikes are great for fun, or for commuting in a sleepy little village, but not much else.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

My preferred method of transport in Japan.

I rode from Kameari along the river over to Shin-Kiowa, rain or shine, typhoon or snow, to avoid having to wait for the morning train from my bartending job. No traffic, nobody around, no DUI. It was fantastic.

Just went for an 11.5Klm ride in an hour, rather than drive to the South end of the beach here, just to check if an ice vending machine had been relocated in the area instead of being removed…it’s gone.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The first time I tried to ride from KitaSenju down to Ropponggi area, I didn’t make it half way and some guy almost killed me, I should have been dead. He didn’t even get out of the car and help me at all. Then, after the cops told him where I lived, he came by trying to apologize, I refused to answer the door.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Probably save 800 million tons if these researchers stopped gas bagging over their impossible dream.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Surprise, surprise, yet another article in JT with the underlying current of "you'll own nothing and be happy" under the guise of sustainable cycling. Note that I'm note claiming there's anything wrong with bicycles - I love riding mine around town to get from A to B - but the idea is to denigrate individual car ownership in favour of shared ownership or renting. But someone is going to own them, most likely a large corporation because that's the way the world is heading if we don't put a hard stop to it.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

@WA4TKG,

Good stories,my friend.

I regularly ride between Kameari and Shin Koiwa.

To be honest,I cycle a lot and Katsushika in Tokyo is probably the best place to ride in Tokyo given it is pretty flat and the roads aren't too crowded considering it is located in the most crowded city on Earth.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Surprise, surprise, yet another article in JT with the underlying current of "you'll own nothing and be happy"

No part of the article could validly be characterized as such, it gives an argument based on objective data as a way to reduce the negative effect human activity has on climate change, which would be a very positive thing to do, but in no way it makes an argument for people to "own nothing". It doesn't even say cycling is the only possible option or that it would solve the problem entirely.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

No part of the article could validly be characterized as such, it gives an argument based on objective data as a way to reduce the negative effect human activity has on climate change, which would be a very positive thing to do, but in no way it makes an argument for people to "own nothing". It doesn't even say cycling is the only possible option or that it would solve the problem entirely.

As par for the course, you completely miss or intentionally ignore trends in information and reporting, both on JT and myriad other sources. Do sharpen up.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Politicians and wealthy people first !

People are free to use their money the way they wish.

Cycling is dangerous in my opinion in the long term if you would use it for all activities.

Personnally, I can't cycle since I do sometimes hundreds of miles and need not to sweat.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Not going to work in NA with the past decades of car centric infrastructure and laws already set in place.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No part of the article could validly be characterized as such, it gives an argument based on objective data as a way to reduce the negative effect human activity has on climate change, which would be a very positive thing to do, but in no way it makes an argument for people to "own nothing".

Wrong. A basic read of the article tells otherwise.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Wrong. A basic read of the article tells otherwise.

The very basic fact that you faile to point out any contradiction clearly shows this is not the case, just a failed attempt to baselessly criticize with something you didn't like to read.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Surprise, surprise, yet another article in JT with the underlying current of "you'll own nothing and be happy" 

Are you feeling alright?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Your accusation what that THIS article argued for people to own nothing, when confronted with an argument that THIS article has nothing of the sort trying to deflect to other sources means you are accepting your accusation was false and you could not find anything to support it.

Just have to thoroughly read THIS article.

Give up cars, or share rides.

The Dutch, or Danish can get by in their daily life on bikes (or ice skates in the winter); this quasi-socialist approach to transportation won't work in most of the world though.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Just have to thoroughly read THIS article.

Give up cars, or share rides.

That is a very long way to "own nothing", thus your argument has no value. Would an article about "give up your bicycle, get a car instead" is about owning nothing to you?

The Dutch, or Danish can get by in their daily life on bikes (or ice skates in the winter); this quasi-socialist approach to transportation won't work in most of the world though.

Which is the problem that is being dealt in the article, there is nothing wrong with intepreting the article as a call for governments to facilitate cycling, which would lead to more people to do it in a safe and convenient way, improving life for everybody and their health at the same time.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

That is a very long way to "own nothing", thus your argument has no value. Would an article about "give up your bicycle, get a car instead" is about owning nothing to you?

A "long way"? Is that an economic term?

Which is the problem that is being dealt in the article, there is nothing wrong with intepreting the article as a call for governments to facilitate cycling, which would lead to more people to do it in a safe and convenient way, improving life for everybody and their health at the same time.

That is the surface message. Myself and other posters are looking a little deeper into this article. Give it a try.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

A "long way"? Is that an economic term?

Why would it need to be an economic term, both things are obviously not equivalent, so a personal, invalid way to interpret the article is more evidence of a personal bias than an actual flaw in the article.

That is the surface message. Myself and other posters are looking a little deeper into this article. Give it a try.

If you are unable to find how something is the only way to validly interpret the article and have to use the excuse of your personal interpretation to understand something that is not written anywhere then you are criticizing how you choose to interpret the article, not how it was written.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites