food

'English nouveau': a young red to rival Beaujolais

11 Comments
By Sylvain PEUCHMAURD

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11 Comments
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"It's not a wine to be taken too seriously, it's a fun drink, taking on the spirit of Beaujolais Nouveau,"

Talk of English wine reminds me of the old Monty Python sketch about the alleged horrors of Australian wine (a base lie even then) back in the 1970s.

"This is not a wine for drinking... this is a wine for laying down and avoiding."

11 ( +11 / -0 )

English white wine is delicious and has won many awards. In a taste test, English sparkling wine beat champagne. Wine snobbery is pathetic, you either like the taste or you don’t. The same people wear hideous clothes because of the label.

As a red drinker, I can’t wait to taste this.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

It is very interesting to me to witness some things from the West that are very popular in the East. Some examples that come to mind: wine, Italian cuisine, espresso drinks, and music. If I may say, I concur. I absolutely love a good glass of wine (or two) with dinner, at a good Italian restaurant, listening to the local Korean orchestra play live classical music, while a Diva entrances us with her amazing voice.

Sigh. Looking forward to this pandemic being over, and I feel sorry for all the people who do not live in California.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

With the global warming, it's inevitable that the wine taste will change and northern regions will have the appropriate climate.

It's sad but true.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"It's not a wine to be taken too seriously, it's a fun drink, taking on the spirit of Beaujolais Nouveau," winemaker Simon Day explained at his vineyard in Ledbury, near Hereford.

Truly astonishing statement to make.

After all the hard work and the investment.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I hope its better than Beaujolais Nouveau. It'd have to be, that stuff is barely good enough as a cooking wine.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@itsonlyrockandroll, it’s called marketing, he is positioning it for the demographic he aims to sell it to.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yes certainly need a sense of humour.

Instead of the traditional variety of Gamay grape used in Beaujolais, the English winemaker uses Pinot Noir.

So not a Beaujolais, in fact a Pinot Noir.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

"This is not a wine for drinking... this is a wine for laying down and avoiding."

That brought back memories.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcM3ATkNIS8

1 ( +1 / -0 )

itsonlyrocknrollToday  02:20 am JST

Yes certainly need a sense of humour.

Instead of the traditional variety of Gamay grape used in Beaujolais, the English winemaker uses Pinot Noir.

So not a Beaujolais, in fact a Pinot Noir.

The wine producer or article writer didn't say it was a Beaujolais, they said it takes on the spirit of it by using young grapes. Anyway Beaujolais is a French region, so it would always be 'English Nouveau' even it it used Gamay grapes.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It is vital that Brand identity and association are taken into full account when marketing products.

Refrain. desist from inane game planning that distorts the overall strategy to convince prospective consumers from becoming customers.

Nouveau is a Brand name associated with Beaujolais.

So, to label a bottle of Pinot Noir, 'English nouveau' is vacuous gimmicky. It counterproductive, absurd and unnecessary.

Then to gush, "It's not a wine to be taken too seriously, it's a fun drink, taking on the spirit of Beaujolais Nouveau," is pure Alan Partridge

One occasion on a trip to Brighton UK sticks in my memory.

At a food market, a stall specializing in Artisan Cheeses was surrounded by groups of Italian tourists and wholesalers, in red faced fury tearing down food stall placards advertising English Parmigiano-Reggiano.

The sellers totally obvious and ignorant of fact the “cheese” was not and never could be described a Parmesan.

Simon Day has missed an opportunity to market UK’s first red primeur, in a manner that focuses on the bottles contents, instead falling back on a fatuous label marketing strategy.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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