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Japan offering more options for vegans

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Unlike many developed countries around the world, I can't really see any increase or interest in the Japanese public when it comes to veganism or healthy eating. But there are more and more options for vegans nowadays. Just behind by about 10 or 20 years, but still.

For anyone with a sweet tooth, Glico has just released a vegan pucchin purin.

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One step that makes it difficult for japan is fish but creative use of kombu and shiitake for umami is good.

Shiso umeboshi tempura anyone?

Taps style small dish Japanese based international cuisine restaurant advertised strategically will attract any vegan.

Great business to start up.

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The movement has some way to go, 

Take 2:The movement has A LOOOONG way to go,

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Unlike many developed countries around the world, I can't really see any increase or interest in the Japanese public when it comes to veganism or healthy eating.

The (supposed) lack of interest in healthy eating might be because the starting point isn't, for example, a 1960s British-style diet.

The (genuine) lack of interest in veganism and vegetarianism is the norm in this part of the world. There are a few - very few - people who follow a vegetarian diet for religious reasons, as there are in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Korea. Vegetarianism isn't popular in Southeast Asia either, except among people of Indian or Sri Lankan descent - specifically, Hindu, Buddhist and a few smaller religions, but generally not Christians or Muslims. Sikhs can be vegetarian or not.

Those two regions of the world have a combined population of more than 2.2 billion people. Then there are other regions where vegetarianism - let alone veganism - is close to invisible. I would suggest Spain, Portugal, Italy, France, Greece, Poland, all of Eastern Europe and the Balkans, - if we were to tally up, probably the majority of countries in Europe. Then the whole of Africa, most if not all of the Middle East, and the whole of Central and South America.

The situation doesn't seem likely to change much, without other significant cultural shifts occurring first. At best some restaurants are going to offer some vegetarian options, often provided with not much care or interest (as was the case in Britain until quite recently). Others won't bother at all. As for vegan restaurants, many more would appear if there was sufficient commercial demand, but vegans themselves aren't exactly leading the charge.

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The (supposed) lack of interest in healthy eating might be because the starting point isn't, for example, a 1960s British-style diet.

I was rather thinking about the fact that fatty meat is popular, that vegetables in the usual teishoku consist of only shredded cabbage, that Japanese white rice being the worst type of rice especially for diabetics, and that sugar and MSG is found everything.

Before the Meiji era, people never really ate much meat, although it may be because they were forbidden to do so. The only non-vegetarian stuff was seafood. When I told a Japanese woman, she said no, no, no, never. I just shut up. You never argue with or correct a Japanese about Japanese culture. Just say 'so desu ka'.

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I was rather thinking about the fact that fatty meat is popular, that vegetables in the usual teishoku consist of only shredded cabbage, that Japanese white rice being the worst type of rice especially for diabetics, and that sugar and MSG is found everything.

No doubt you were. But white rice sustains people across the planet, and in countries where rice is the staple, white rice is almost invariably preferred over brown. I ain't going to be the one to lecture people that they should be eating something else. I'll just assume that Thais - for example - are eating exactly the rice they want to eat, and leave it at that.

The other stuff you mention is mainly the obsession of health zealots. Separate from that, and more important, is the fact that some countries, Japan among them, have generally healthy diets, and others, Britain among them, rather less so.

Before the Meiji era, people never really ate much meat

So people like to say. There is a tendency, particularly among vegetarians and vegans, to romanticize the diets of earlier generations. In this fantasy world, people the world over ate hardly any meat, if they even ate it at all. Even if true, and that's very disputable, it doesn't help us much. Life back then for many was monotonous, unpleasant, squalid, and unfair.

The only non-vegetarian stuff was seafood.

Doubtful, for those who lived far from the sea and could find non-vegetarian sources of food in the mountains and forests. They were surrounded by it.

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@Pukey2

Unlike many developed countries around the world, I can't really see any increase or interest in the Japanese public when it comes to veganism or healthy eating. But there are more and more options for vegans nowadays. Just behind by about 10 or 20 years, but still.

I reckon one reason for the lack of interest is is the lack of awareness for where and how the meat, the dairy & the eggs comes from.. unpleasant things ne, hide it under the rug. E.g. kids&teens have no idea.

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wipeout:

So people like to say. There is a tendency, particularly among vegetarians and vegans, to romanticize the diets of earlier generations

You can check the internet. I didn't write the stuff.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_vegetarianism#Japan

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/japan-meat-ban

And I end with this statement from the internet:

Japan’s vegan movement is still young, but is brimming with potential, notes the publication. It says, “Japan’s vegan and animal advocacy communities appear to be where those in the US were 20 years ago — full of grassroots energy and excitement.”

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