food

A holiday roast doesn't need to be beef or bird. Try salmon

16 Comments
By Melissa D'Arabian

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16 Comments
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Revolutionary, eh! For America anyway, Except seafood at Christmas has been common in Australia for a long time now. Looks like an interesting recipe though. Salt doesn't need to be kosher. Other salt works just as well.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Obviously not for Japanese cooking. In 20 years in Japan I have yet to see prunes, especially in Miyazaki. Ah, a 2 pound filet? In Japan? You do not buy like that and even most grocers will say, "Sorry we do not sell like that." 450 degree F, how about converting that to Celsius. And BTW convert all those for a Japanese audience since this is Japan Today, right.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

then top it with a quick vinaigrette-style sauce

A Balsamic Vinaigrette works well too on a long thick slab of grilled wild salmon. Don't get the farm raised salmon, its crap.

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You can buy canned prunes in supermarkets. I can even find capers in some supermarkets these days, though they are expensive. Better to get at Costco if one is nearby but then you get enough to last years.

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Hard to get a big fillet of salmon except in Costco. Yes, it's farmed, but it's delicious Atlantic (not the blander Pacific) salmon.

JT: can we have measurements that we can all understand?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

JT: can we have measurements that we can all understand?

Not just understand, but actually use. Any utensils we buy in Japan will not be compatible with the measurements in this article. Pretty pointless to give us a recipe we can't use.

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In 20 years in Japan I have yet to see prunes

? I bought some (not canned, just stoned and in a packet) just today, they're more or less a staple chez cleo. Try your local Coop.

Any utensils we buy in Japan will not be compatible with the measurements in this article

Quite. Temperatures are relatively easy to convert, but I will never understand the instance on measuring chunky solids by the cup. '3/4 cup briny, green olives, pitted' will be a different amount depending on whether they're lightly chopped or left whole.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Any utensils we buy in Japan will not be compatible with the measurements in this article. Pretty pointless to give us a recipe we can't use.

You could still use it. Just improvise a little. If someone with a little knack for cooking / dabbling in the kitchen or grill, you'd be surprised how well a dish might turn out.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I will never understand the instance on measuring chunky solids by the cup. '3/4 cup briny, green olives, pitted' will be a different amount depending on whether they're lightly chopped or left whole.

I believe a Japanese cup and an American cup are different sizes as well.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I believe a Japanese cup and an American cup are different sizes as well.

I went to check that out and found that apparently an American cup is different sizes all by itself. It seems a 'customary' cup is 236.5 mls or half a US pint; a 'legal' cup is 240mls or 16 international tablespoons.

An Imperial cup is half an imperial pint, or 284mls.

A Canadian cup is 8 imperial fluid oz, or 227.3 mlx

A Japanese cup is 200 mls.

A traditional Japanese cup (go, used for measuring rice) is 180 mls.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cup_(unit)

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I've been cooking salmon at least once every two weeks for more than 30 years, and the best way to do it is bake the whole fish (usually 2-3 kilos) at 350F for about 90 minutes, headless and tailless, wrapped in aluminum foil after sprinkling the inside with salt, pepper and lemon zest.

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An Imperial cup is half an imperial pint, or 284mls. A Canadian cup is 8 imperial fluid oz, or 227.3 mlx A Japanese cup is 200 mls.

LoL. & 12" equals? The kings foot.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I suggest replacing the prunes with dates.

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Prunes are readily available at supermarkets in Hokkaido, but I don't think they go well with salmon. You can get large salmon fillets at Costco or the supermarket.

For a recipe like this, the differences between the various cups are negligible, and for conversions, there are plenty of online tools, or you can just type the quantities and units into the Google search bar and it will convert for you. (This works for currencies, too.)

Examples:

half pound in grams

3500 yen in British pounds

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Or if you have a Mac, just use the converter widget.

But that still doesn't tell you how much a cup/tablespoon of butter/carrots/prunes/etc is.

Even a cup of flour works out different depending on whether it's white, wholemeal, rye, sifted, and how packed the cup is.

On the other hand, a gram is always a gram.

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But that still doesn't tell you how much a cup/tablespoon of butter/carrots/prunes/etc is.

http://www.cookitsimply.com/measurements/cups/prunes-dried-0070-018u8.html

Even a cup of flour works out different depending on whether it's white, wholemeal, rye, sifted, and how packed the cup is.

That's why the recipe will specify packed, sifted, etc. If unspecified, it means unpacked.

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