food

All-natural and low-sugar: Kombucha takes U.S. by storm

13 Comments
By Thomas URBAIN

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13 Comments
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Here in the States it is mandated that drinks list on their labels the health benefits. From what I have read on the label, there is nothing in this drink that is useful other than the water.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Just being low in sugar is enough of a health benefit compared to soda.

My friends who love the stuff say that it has to be fresh to get the real benefits. Worth a study to or at least especially since it seems to be becoming widespread.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Here in the States it is mandated that drinks list on their labels the health benefits.

That sounds exceptionally unlikely, as health benefits aren't something that can be easily measured, expressed, or neatly summarized. Even the definition of "health benefit" (as with other vague, feel-good terms like "natural") would be a legal quagmire; let alone whether a particular drink was capable of delivering it.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Some years ago..it was Green Tea.

Then all of a sudden, Avocado!

Now Kombucha.

What's next? Organic Mochi?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Tried Kombucha. Once was enough for me - I'm sticking to the green tea. Whatever it is, healthy or not, you have to be actually able to get it down to get the benefits. Or lack of them. From what I've read, there do seem to be some - maybe as Manny Pereira says up above, it has to be fresh. That's not as easy as getting it off the supermarket shelves.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I’ve drunk a fair bit of it over the past couple of years. I don’t love it, but it’s a good healthy replacement for sodas. They are low in sugar but you still get that sweet fizziness. If you are someone who drinks a lot of soda you are not going to enjoy it, as it’s not as sweet and doesn’t taste as good. But if you are a healthy lifestyle person it fits in well.

Interesting fact is that it’s not the same as 昆布茶 (こんぶちゃ konbucha), which is made from seaweed (konbu) in Japan. In Japanese it’s called キノコの茶 (きのこのちゅ kinoko no cha) mushroom tea. It’s thought that the name comes from Japanese, but the etymology isn’t entirely clear.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Mugi-cha.

Nothing beats good ol' mugi-cha.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This stuff is soooooo Good

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@wipeout

"That sounds exceptionally unlikely, as health benefits aren't something that can be easily measured.."

The US, like other countries, regulates nutrient and health claims on labeling for food and drugs, based on specific standards.

https://www.fda.gov/regulatory-information/search-fda-guidance-documents/guidance-industry-food-labeling-guide

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It has less sugar than soda, but so do many other drinks, such as tea and water. My opinion is that if you like it, go for it, but I will not jump on the band wagon just to be cool.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The US, like other countries, regulates nutrient and health claims on labeling for food and drugs, based on specific standards.

Yes Jeff, you're stating the obvious (though drugs are not relevant in any way to the original comment I was addressing).

As part of regulation concerning drinks, is it required for "health benefits" to be stated on the label? If yes, then the original comment was correct. If no, then it's wrong. If my question has to be reworded to get a yes, then it's wrong again.

Presumably you understand the crucial difference between placing restrictions on health claims and requiring companies to list the health benefits of their drinks. And also the simple distinction between "you cannot" and "you must". And also that nutrition information and health benefits are not the same thing at all.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The jury is still out on kombucha, but there is evidence that it may have health benefits:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/8-benefits-of-kombucha-tea

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319630.php

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It has less sugar than soda, but so do many other drinks, such as tea and water.

It also has carbonation though, which tea and water don't.

Although you can buy carbonated (aka infused) flavored water in the stores in other countries - something else I've been drinking over the past couple of years. It also isn't as sweet as soda (or sweet at all for that matter), but can be a healthier alternative to sodas.

Personally, I don't really care about the sweetness of sodas, it's actually the carbonation I like, which is why I enjoy these drinks.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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