Photo: PR Times
food

All-plant-based katsu curry arrives at Ikea Japan

15 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

When you’re feeling consumed by carnivorous cravings, there’s nothing quite like a nice plate of katsu curry. Curry, rice, and a cutlet on top are practically the holy triumvirate of fortifying comfort food in Japan, and katsu curry has also become one of the country’s most popular culinary exports as it gains fans around the world.

So it’s not too surprising that Ikea has added katsu curry to the dining options at its in-store restaurants in Japan. But while the Ikea menu now has katsu curry, said katsu curry has no meat whatsoever.

The Born from the Fields Plant Katsu Curry (499 yen) is entirely plant-based. While that’s sort of a given for the rice, the roux and even the cutlet contain no animal products, with the katsu being a mixture of soybean and other plant-based ingredients. In addition, Ikea’s non-katsu curry is also going plant-based, and since it’s replacing the company’s previous curry recipe, plant-based curry is now the only kind Ikea is serving.

The switch, which occurred on Sept 3, comes as part of the chain’s new initiatives to promote sustainability and address climate change. Several other plant-based items were simultaneously added to the menu, including plant-based cabbage rolls, chocolate mousse, and kebab flat bread at the chain’s branch in Tokyo’s Harajuku neighborhood (the only location that doesn’t offer curry).

IC-4.jpg

While the phrase “katsu curry” is most commonly taken to mean “curry rice with a pork cutlet,” technically katsu can be made with other things too, since it just means “cutlet.” Ikea promises that its soy-based katsu curry cutlet will satisfy meat lovers, and urges dinners to “please try it once” before making up their minds about it.

Source: PR Times via Entabe

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- The U.K. thinks Japanese curry is katsu curry, and people aren’t happy about it

-- Japan’s biggest curry chain now offers a true vegetarian curry

-- No time to cook? No problem! Three easy ways to improve instant curry

© SoraNews24

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

15 Comments
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If there's no pork in it, it's not katsu.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

i ONLY go for the meatballs!!

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

They obviously do it to pull the punters in, but it's good that Ikea and Costco have cheap cafes. 500 yen for this curry. I bet there are people living nearby who go solely to eat there.

(I might be tempted by the kebab instead)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Don't see how Costco can be cheap if you have to buy membership.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

You recover the cost of the membership back very quickly. Ever been to a Costco?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Don't see how Costco can be cheap if you have to buy membership.

??? How much exactly do you think a membership is?!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Probably using sawdust from their manufacturing operations.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Good on Ikea.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Or

0 ( +0 / -0 )

More ultra processed junk food.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

More ultra processed junk food.

A lot better than the 'food' at MacDonalds.

ossan:

Don't see how Costco can be cheap if you have to buy membership.

You do know how Costco works? Eyes rolling.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Peter NeilSep. 18  10:22 pm JST

You recover the cost of the membership back very quickly. Ever been to a Costco?

Yup. Probably earlier than most of you all here. And before they opened in Japan. Eventually got tired of constantly having to buy things in quantities for 8-10 people all the time.

Pukey2Sep. 19  01:17 am JST

You do know how Costco works? Eyes rolling.

Never fail to amuse me.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

StrangerlandSep. 18  10:30 pm JST

Don't see how Costco can be cheap if you have to buy membership.

??? How much exactly do you think a membership is?!

Currently exactly USD 60 p/year for standard and USD 120 p/year for the higher grade. Costco derives 66.6% of it's profits from membership dues.

To make it worthwhile you need to be shopping for a family of at least 4-5 and have no qualms supporting the Kirkland house brand because you'd need to buy in bulk. Just look at the sheer size of their shopping carts (in the U.S.)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If you shop there once a month, membership adds 400 yen to each trip. The only way to recoup your membership costs is by regularly buying gasoline, and using a Costco credit card that accrues points. You can also give a child not living at home a second card for the family, which defrays costs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

To make it worthwhile you need to be shopping for a family of at least 4-5 and have no qualms supporting the Kirkland house brand because you'd need to buy in bulk. Just look at the sheer size of their shopping carts (in the U.S.)

The shopping carts, parking spaces, and toilets are exactly the same at the Costcos here in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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