Photo: Aosan / Ushico | © PIXTA
food

Drinkable onigiri rice balls to go

8 Comments
By Ben K, grape Japan

The onigiri or rice ball is one of Japan's most popular traditional snacks. Although they once used to be sold in specialty shops, nowadays they're virtually ubiquitous, available in convenience stores and even gaining recognition in the famed Michelin guide.

You have to admire Japanese ingenuity when it comes to the onigiri. Whether they're triangular or round, they're designed to be easy to grasp, the nori seaweed wrapper holds all the ingredients in place and protects fingers from getting dirty, and there are unlimited possibilities when it comes to ingredients either filling the inside or mixed into the rice itself.

Just when you thought the onigiri couldn't get any more convenient, along comes Yokoo Daily Foods with a radical new idea.

Introducing the drinkable rice ball

Leveraging their experience making jellied konnyaku (konjac potato) foods and drinks, Yokoo Daily Foods put all the ingredients of an onigiri into an easy-to-use squeeze pouch and called it Nomu onigiri 飲むおにぎり ("drinkable onigiri"). So far, they have created two flavors:

Ume-Katsuo: Pickled plum and bonito flakes

onigiridrink_2.jpg
Photo: Socialwire Co., Ltd.

Ume-Kombu: Pickled plum and seasoned kombu seaweed

onigiridrink_1.jpg
Photo: Socialwire Co., Ltd.

Each 130g pouch costs 160 yen (excluding tax).

Why Drinkable Onigiri?

According to their press release, Yokoo Daily Foods wanted to create an onigiri alternative that provided needed fiber and calories (200 in each pouch) and could be stored at room temperature for a whole year. Moreover, the current boom in pouch beverages inspired them to put their beverage into this convenient format which could be consumed with one hand. Finally, as the text on the package indicates, it doesn't require chewing, which presumably makes it a good option for the sick or the elderly.

Availability

"Nomu onigiri" is on sale at Konnyaku Park in Gunma Prefecture, the Konnyaku Park online shop and in supermarkets throughout Japan.

Sources: Ushico | © PIXTA / Aosan | © PIXTA / © SocialWire Co., Ltd.

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© grape Japan

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

8 Comments
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Why?...Just.....Why?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Why?...Just.....Why?

From the article:

it doesn't require chewing, which presumably makes it a good option for the sick or the elderly.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Definitely could see this being helpful to elderly with no teeth or someone with an injury who couldn't chew.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

She doesn't look like she's enjoying it in the pic

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Okay, I have to admit for some people this could be useful. Now that I've gotten that caveat out of the way, NOOOOOO!! There are some things that should not be tampered with:

Coffee. Should be enjoyed, if at all possible, sitting in a coffee shop, or at home. I do allow in car, but don't prefer that.

All food. I NEVER use a drive through. Even if taking out. Same as coffee, food deserves to be enjoyed in a decent atmosphere.

Yes, I am a traditionalist, almost purest sometimes and about some things.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Horrific...just horrific.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm ready for a cheeseburger shake now ;)=

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The new generation is full of complaints, excuses & negativities.

It's for some people, Not for all.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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