food

Fast food service in Japan vs America: 2 videos tell the story

64 Comments

The fast food experience in Japan is much different that it is in America.

In Japan, step into any fast food restaurant and you are treated with the kind of service you see in commercials. Polite and attentive staff work in seemingly perfect unison to get customers their meal as quickly as possible, all while maintaining a smile on their face.

In America, the reality isn’t so golden. Fast food staff are often uninspired and lack enthusiasm and, perhaps as one reason for that, the customers can be loud, obtrusive and sometimes even violent.

At least, this is the image people are getting from two YouTube videos that have been making the rounds in the Japanese net since this weekend.

The first video was taken by a foreigner inside of a McDonald’s in Osaka and shows a small unit of female staff keeping on their toes and moving through the line of customers like clockwork.

Whereas most foreign viewers praise the professionalism of the Japanese staff, many Japanese viewers actually seem to find it embarrassing that their people are so willing to jump through hoops for a measly 800 yen per hour.

Still, compared with what American fast food workers have to go through.

That’s right, Cheeseburger Josh has now become famous in Japan.

The contrast presented by these two videos raises a few interesting questions. Are the Japanese suckers for working so hard for so little pay? Would American fast food workers be willing to put in a little more effort if they didn’t have to deal with customers like Cheeseburger Josh? And perhaps the most intriguing question is: what would happen if a hungry Cheeseburger Josh walked into Japanese McDonald’s?

Source: PMAGa90NE

© RocketNews24

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.


64 Comments
Login to comment

"Whereas most foreign viewers praise the professionalism of the Japanese staff, many Japanese viewers actually seem to find it embarrassing that their people are so willing to jump through hoops for a measly 800 yen per hour."

You're missing the point: they are not doing it for the 800Yen/hour...they are doing it for the customers to have a good experience and ultimately for themselves to give their very best--an expression of themselves.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

It's called "fast" food for a reason. U.S. use to be like this decades ago but you'd be lucky to get a simple "thank you" to a paying customer nowadays.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Not to be too picky but if you're going to run a story comparing "service" in the two countries, you made a mistake to focus on the Cheeseburger Josh video - it has nothing to do with service but rather a belligerent customer. Guys like that are going to cause trouble whether you have good service or not. You should have two videos focusing on the same side of the counter.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

Are fast food workers more polite and do they provide better service in Japan? Probably. But this article is decieving in that the US video only shows some @sshole (probably drunk) creating a commotion. Does that have anything to do with the level of US service? It might, but to my eye, this video comparison misses the mark.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

Did no one call the cops on the cheeseburger lumpolard?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Don't most Japanese businesses pay around the 700-800 mark for part-time employees to "jump through hoops"?

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Here is Joe Gichebarou (the guy sitting at the table) YouTube response at a later date.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kirC81k-kM

And YouTube "Cheeseburger Josh meets Joe" at a Texas radio station.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbsbJByfmgU

0 ( +1 / -1 )

one of the biggest difference I found was that the staff in Japan is much much better looking.

13 ( +14 / -1 )

This is a generalization. Yes, I think the standard of customer service in Japan is more... standardized to be polite. But it's not warm or friendly, and I have gasp had quite a few bad customer service experiences here (including at McDonald's). Just because they more or less follow a script doesn't mean it's good. In the West, the thing is it varies more. You can have terrible customer service, but you can also have awesome, friendly, great service.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Just because they more or less follow a script doesn't mean it's good.

Exactly. Simply being polite does not equate to superior customer service. Once took me four tries to get a burger at BK without mayo and lettuce. Or try getting the folks at Subway to add just a few more black olives or pickles than the few measely ones the bucho has directed.

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

Comparing a video of people just doing their job and nothing special happening; and a video of people fighting, is stupid. You can't compare the two.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Yes, it is a generalization - but from my experience it is spot on. Service in fast food joints is way better here, of course back home I can have a reasonably good customer experience at a fast food joint too but it happens only sometimes. In Japan it is more of a rule than an exception. Yes, they may follow a script here more than in the west but hey at a fast food joint that is all I want - a fast , efficient service and maybe a smile to go with it.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

"Just because they more or less follow a script doesn't mean it's good."

Yes it does. I don't give a flying @@@@ if it's scripted or not. I came in for FAST food and that's what I want.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Generally speaking I've found MacDonalds in Japan to have good service, but you do find the occasionally surly person. But First Kitchen? Whenever I've been into that place, I don't see anything special about their staff, they've got no enthusiasm in them, and look distinctly unhappy to be working there. I find articles like this just love to bash anything about America. Talk about tarring everyone with the same brush.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Generally speaking the fast food/convenience store service is pretty good. People usually get in and out without too much fuss as the staff seems well trained in doing there job. However, and maybe this is part of the culture, the friendliness sometimes is not there. You can go to the same shop everyday for a year and more than likely you will get the same greeting, the same recitation for the same actions of giving and receiving your cash.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Oh c'mon, this article is absolutely ridiculous. It isn't about the pay. Japanese treat their customers the way that they do because they realize that is the way that customers should be treated. You could pay Americans at Fast food restaurants double what they are making now and they would still be fat, out of shaped, shirts untugged, rude staff. It is just the way that the Americans have become.

7 ( +9 / -3 )

I am not sure how it is here in Japan but in the USA there is a stigma with fast food work. And generally it is perceived as a job for adolescents, handicapped individuals, or adults that could not succeed in life. I find that most Japanese people at work try to be professional regardless of what job they have, where as Americans Think that the less they are paid the less of a damn they need to give about their job professionalism.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

I hate bad service and rude staff. Having said that, at the end of the day, bad service won't kill you, but junk food will.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Of all the millions of YouTube videos that are uploaded EVERY SINGLE DAY, I'm sure you could find any two that could prove any point you wanted, and then dress it up as a serious news article asking a serious question, leading the reader to believe pretty much any slant you wanted them to.

Of course, one might argue from those two videos that the customers in Japan are trained just as well as the staff. Throw a monkey wrench in the operation, and everybody freaks.

While back in America, while Josh and that guy are wrestling on the floor, you can hear the Micky D's girl in the back continuing to call out orders.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I am not sure how it is here in Japan but in the USA there is a stigma with fast food work.

LOL. That's why teaching jobs in Japan are called "McJobs"

2 ( +5 / -3 )

"...many Japanese viewers actually seem to find it embarrassing that their people are so willing to jump through hoops for a measly 800 yen per hour."

Though clearly not embarrassed enough for bosses to pay, nor the the general population to campaign for, a decent wage for these people.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

One other difference is that fast food in Japan isn't always that fast. Even at Maccy D's. try a Freshness or Mos and you can wait over 5 minutes for your meal.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I don't care about US FF service. Macs in Japan are NOT fast. You have to go through the 100 question gantlet first and you have to be prepaired many hours in advance for all the critical decisions they force you to make. MacStaff - Are you going to dine in our premisses? Cust - Not sure. Are there any empty seats upstairs cause everything's crowded down here? MS - .......Are you going to dine.... C - Never mind. Yes, I will. I need uan chizubaga and uan fraido poteto, eru (the last part was in Japanese by the way). MS - Would you like them in a set? C - No I want them separately. MS - The set comes with a drink for only xxx Yen. C - Ok, but what drinks are in the set? MS - ........Coke, tea (!!!!), cofee and orange juice (!!!)... C - No, thanks I'll just have the burger and the fries. MS - You want a cheesburger or a plain burger? We also have the extra special traditional burger for this month with nato. C - Does it taste good? MS - Which one, sir? C - ...Which one is the best? MS - I'm not sure, I'll need to ask my super. C - Why? Haven't you tried them? MS - ..... C - Anyway, I'll stick to the cheezburger. MS - So, will that be one cheezburger and one fries? C - Yes. MS - Fries L size? C - Yes MS - Not in a set. C - Yes, not in a set. MS - And no drink. C - Yes, (dammit) no drink. MS - That will be xxx C - Here u go MS - out of xxx...I'm returning your change. Hope to see you in our premisses again.

Similar moronic interludes with high school part-timers in high pitched shrieking voices time and time again...until I decided I don't need all this. I much prefer my Moss Burger (you could get caught in a mosh!!!) even though it's slower and the staff at the counter is usually Korean or Chinese (in my area). Much less questions. And I don't care about the time it takes them in Burger King. 100 times better than Mac. Or for really fast food Yoshinoya is turbo-fast. Just read Mac's hiring senior Japanese in their 80s. Can you imagine your grandma working behind the counter of a Mac instead or retiring her old, tired bones? FF in Japan are fast because the customers are not demanding. All they need to do is grunt their replies. Try asking for no tomato, extra ketchap, no onion and you'll see how long it takes them.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Pidestroika, you must be a foreigner to have that much trouble with just cheeseburger and large fries!! ;)

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Yeah, try asking for a burger without pickles in Japan. Not gonna happen. The staff will get a startled look on their face and say something like, "but, it comes with pickles!" You can insist for five minutes straight, it's a waste of your time.

And American McDonald's is cheaper, too, so. Yeah.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

"Whereas most foreign viewers praise the professionalism of the Japanese staff, many Japanese viewers actually seem to find it embarrassing that their people are so willing to jump through hoops for a measly 800 yen per hour."

I think the people who gave me thumbs down might have missed my point. Japanese part-time wages for the work and effort that goes into it, comes across as pretty low to me, and I'm sure the vast majority of Japanese aren't surprised at the amount of hoops other workers have to jump through. I've seen far worse training sessions for employees at convenience stores and izakaya- all for a measly minimum wage. One that stood out, was a popular yakiniku chain I was walking past that had the manager screaming at employees in the carpark and making them bellow the same greetings and welcoming spiel until he was satisfied- all in front of waiting traffic.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

TSRnow, Yeah, and??? What's your point? Are you saying they ask me all these stupid questions cause I'm a foreigner? I have problem only in Mac because I don't grunt like most Japanese. That's why I don't go there any more. No problem any place else. They understand my Japanese just fine.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

For people having trouble ordering burgers without pickles, cheese or whatever...why don,t you just order a burger that is on the menu as it is and THEN take out the pickles etc.if you don`t like them? Probably saves time and frustration for everyone involved. Pretty simple really.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

try asking for a burger without pickles in Japan. Not gonna happen.

Rubbish. Neither my husband nor my son like pickles, they both order without. (Not that we frequent Mac all that much, but it was a treat for the kids when they were little) Every time we get a kashikomarimshita and a card with a number on, two minutes later the girl brings two freshly-made burgers without pickles to our table. Nor it is a 'but we don't understand the furriners' thing either - I can order for them no problem.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Well here in Houston, Texas you will be lucky if you are served by someone who can speak English. Having just come back to Texas from Japan after a 25 year absence, it ain't like it used to be..... Mac, burger K., Kentucky, taco bell, etc. It's really hard to understand what the people at the register are trying to say. Mac Japan is like a fine dining service when compared to the US. Most of the kitchen workers are illegals who earn 20 dollars a day for 12 hour days....yes things have changed in my hometown where I hear Spanish almost everywhere I go, and people riding bicycles everywhere because they can't get a license. I guess the workers at Mac Japan can't understand the foreigners when we ask for ketchup without using the proper ケチャップ

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@cornbread

You're missing the point: they are not doing it for the 800Yen/hour...they are doing it for the customers to have a good experience and ultimately for themselves to give their very best--an expression of themselves.

Sounds like a training manual. Which branch do you manage?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Seems ridiculous to make sweeping statements.....but here goes!

Japanese fast food joints are typically staffed high school, college students. They are sweet but also frickin slooooow. So if you are in a fairly empty shop the expereince is pretty good.

but god help you if you are somewhere busy. lots of staff, lots of wasted movement, annoyingly ineffecient. I blame it on the poor training provided to staff by the managers not the staff themselves.

If you ever get the chance check out the McDonalds in Tokyo Tower. This has to be one on the busiest shops in Japan but the staff are super quick, super efficient and very professional. And they are mostly all foreign! They can do more with 5 staff than a typical shop staffed with 20 untrained inexpereinced part-timers. It all comes down to training.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

You're missing the point: they are not doing it for the 800Yen/hour...they are doing it for the customers to have a good experience and ultimately for themselves to give their very best--an expression of themselves.

Sure they are. But I bet if they were offered a pay rise, they'd at least consider accepting it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

gameoverSep. 06, 2012 - 12:41PM JST

Japanese fast food joints are typically staffed high school, college students. ..... I blame it on the poor training provided to staff by the managers not the staff themselves.

Agree, Japan is the place where fast food is definitely not fast. I think it has more to do with Japanese, while being excellent at doing one task well, are absolutely useless at multi-tasking.

You'd have to train out the Japanese education system from them, to change it.

-11 ( +0 / -11 )

Polite, inept service. About half the time they get my order wrong. It's not my Japanese. Happened to my gf's sister just last week. Anything other than Set1, 2 or 3 and it all starts falling apart.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I actually have an easier time ordering food at fast food places in Japan than in the U.S., despite my limited japanese. I'm not sure they're speaking English anymore in America... One lady at Starbucks asked how to spell my name "Karl" (and not just the K vs C).

@Pidestroika: I have no idea how you manage to complicate such a simple thing... Just grunting answers works much quicker and easier. You're really asking the staff at a fast food place if a particular burger is any good?!?! What do you think they're going to answer? "No, our food tastes like shit"?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Pidestroika

Agreed that McDonald's in the US is faster on average than in Japan. I like Mos Burger and First Kitchen, but if you cant get your order in under 5 minutes, another term besides "fast food" is needed. Maybe "semi-fast food "? Just saying...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The service may be better here in these fast food joints. The food, however, is still crap.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

greenlight and the rest. You're missing the point. J Macs are fast because the staff and the customers all work under a certain kind of rules and behavior. The customers robotically point to what they want to consume and the staff robotically bring it to them. The staff can prepare quickly big quantities of certain products (cheezburgers, Big Macs or whatever) and they just deliver them to the customers when they get orders. The whole system is tuned to work quickly and efficiently because the customers rarely if ever have special demands. Once a customer asks a question or starts any kind of discussion beyond what's in the corporate manual the whole system slows down significantly. I gave an example of a conversation I sometimes had. The constant "confirming" and "re-confirming" and the standardized yes-no answers to standardized questions as if no other answer is allowed is not for me. Yes, I could behave like any other Japanese. Sure. Grunt and get my order. I prefer not to blip and have my batteries changed ever so often though. Me not being happy with Mac doesn't mean you can't be happy. Should we all agree about everything? I said I prefer other joints where they don't bust my tama with their stupid questions and the quality is much better even if I had to wait a bit longer. So, yes. If you want to "eat" fast, Macs in Japan are the fastest. If you want something more than just to consume junk food, they ain't. And I believe the subject of the article is Fast Food service in Japan in general. Not just Mac.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Pidestroika、do you really ask what tastes good? :-D

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That wasn't supposed to be a quote, that was me! One wrong keyboard stroke......

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Himajin. Not after the first year in Japan.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

When I first came to Japan, I too had some trouble getting my order through to the staff at McDonald's, but that was simply because my pronunciation and Japanese was terrible. I also had to get used to NOT saying "hash browns" or "French fries", as there is no vocabulary like that here. Now, I have no trouble and service is really fast (like one to two minutes fast, depending on what kind of food I order). I also enjoy the fact that I have never had a wrong order and the lettuce in my burgers are actually crispy. Compare that with McDonald's in the U.S. and you'll get soggy lettuce almost every time. Also, make sure you check your brown paper bag if you order check out, since you may often have missing things, or wrong burgers. I also prefer the "Irrashaimase" to the "Yeah, what'll you want" response said by staff in the U.S., with the attitude as if I'm wasting their time.

Once a customer asks a question or starts any kind of discussion beyond what's in the corporate manual the whole system slows down significantly

Well, in the U.S., if you ask anything out of the ordinary, they may understand you, but they'll be pissed off and make an excuse why they can't do it. I and my friends have had experiences like that before. One time, my friend wanted no ice in her coke in a U.S. McDonald's. The staff did it, but slammed the drink on the tray so hard that coke dripped off the sides and there ended up being the same amount of coke in the cup as if he had ordered a regular coke with ice.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I'm no Japanophile. At all. But I find the politeness of the Japanese service industry makes me feel like being really polite to them. And I couldn't care if it's scripted; I'm not there to be their friend or anything. Canada or America? Those employees act like I asked them to get up off the couch during American Idol and lend me a burger from their personal stash.

Being polite costs nothing but it's great to receive. I know it sounds cheesy, but it's true. It's a social lubricant.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

nigelboy: "Yes it does. I don't give a flying @@@@ if it's scripted or not. I came in for FAST food and that's what I want."

Not necessarily so (the script part being better, I mean). While I agree that Japanese fast food service tends to be (and I stress 'tends) lords above the same service in the US in particular, the problem with the scripted and automaton way of doing it here is when the customer goes off script. You don't know how many times I've seen counter or serving staff (or people on the phone for that matter) freeze light deer in headlights (you can still hear it on the phone! haha) if you don't understand one restaurant chain's set word or how to reply. One girl, who was working at the McD's a visit a couple of weeks after my arrival in Japan literally burst into tears because she didn't know how to paraphrase a word I had never heard before. It took her manager and two others to simply figure out an easier way to say it so that I understood.

I of course don't have any language problems any more as with above, but I'll still throw in a bit of English here and there -- like "Thanks" at the end, or a "yes" and it throws them for a loop (sometimes they giggle and say "You're Welcome", which is nice because it's the 'real' them).

Still, though, as I said, I much prefer the speed and service here than a lot of the apathy and even ignorance you run into at such restaurants back home. No excuse for people like Cheeseburger Josh's attitude, but I can see how people get frustrated.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Himajin. Not after the first year in Japan.

It struck me as funny, in a good way (not making fun!). I wondered what responses you'd get usually. it made me smile for some reason. I bet it discombobulated people ;-)

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Ummmm............... most of the fast food places we go to, wherever it is in the world, looks just like the first video. It's not unique. (Or we must be good at picking.)

Nonetheless, most of those fast food places are staffed by teenagers.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Wait, what's Burger King's slogan? Have it your way? Would that work?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Himajin. Oh, yeah. Had plenty of head-scratching. Gave it up though after the 153rd time. Another example. Was in "Friday's" in Ueno and a hot waitress is coming to greet me and the missus at the entrance. First thing she says "Smoking table or non-smoking". I said "Good evening to you too. We'd like a NICE table, please". You could literally see the question mark above her head flashing.

Stuff like that don't happen in the inaka. Most people I've met are friendly, talkative and use their heads to be helpful and really treat the customers very good. Best service I've ever had was in a spa in Beppu. The old lady offered to make our futon, prepared the nabe herself and explained everything about the local dishes. Service like that you don't get in any other country in the world. That's the Japan I love. Mac is total...you know what.

Best Fast Food service in Tokyo, "Suika" ramen in Ueno station. You get DELICIOUS ramen in about 5 minutes and the staff never scream or shout. Try it.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Never been to America, and I don't frequent MacDonald's or KFC here in the UK, but on the odd occasion I've been into a Japanese Mac, Mos or Freshness I've been amazed at how fast the girls are. Yes, I've had to wait, but I'm not an impatient person so it doesn't faze me.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"I find that most Japanese people at work try to be professional regardless of what job they have,"

That's it!

We've always been able to get burgers without different stuff for the kids. Staff are polite, some even try to speak English, and I've been to many Macs where there are female staff in the 40s or 50s and they are harder working and more polite than the youngsters.

Pride in work no matter what it is a a great thing.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Pride in work no matter what it is a a great thing.

Certainly a great thing for the boss. "You folks take pride in your work, I'll take the profits." Win-win, right?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Lucabrasi, yeah exactly.

Win, win. The boss also has to worry about paying for the premises, the utilities, the staff, the product, the taxes, doing the accounting, and worrying about whether there will be any customers.

But, both you are I are just stating the obvious aren't we?

But now that I've seen the American video, it's not only about taking pride in your work, but maybe more Americans could take pride in being decent, civil customers.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Cheeseburger Josh got his ass whupped, ha ha!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There is a big cultural difference: eating in the US is a necessity like going to a gas station. Only a vital and commercial act (a bit provocative, but not far from truth).

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

people are so willing to jump through hoops for a measly 800 yen per hour.

This line really sticks out for me. So if a "fair" salary is 2400 yen an hour, according to this author, someone earning 800 yen an hour should only give 30% effort?

... what a strange idea. If I agree to work for 800 yen an hour then I work my hardest and best for that hour. If I don't want to work for 800 yen, then I don't agree to work. One doesn't walk in and then sabotage one's employer because one feels one isn't getting a "fair" wage. One just walks out.

The problem with the logic of employees deciding what is "fair" is that almost everyone feels underpaid, even CEOs earning millions feel they should be earning more. According to this author's logic they would be entitled to withhold a portion of their labour and, in effect, sabotage their employers.

Idiotic.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Not necessarily so (the script part being better, I mean). While I agree that Japanese fast food service tends to be (and I stress 'tends) lords above the same service in the US in particular, the problem with the scripted and automaton way of doing it here is when the customer goes off script.

Smith. You chose a poor example for "off script" with your "ijyou" example. That's equivalent of an employee trying to find a alternate phrase of "is that all" to a non-English speaking customer. You're going to get a "deer in the head lights" type reaction no matter where you are.

And as Cleo stated, ordering something "without pickles" is a cinch. And as for "fast" service, may I suggest you research "kokyaku, kaitensuu" in regards to MacDonads for their profitability as well as deciding which stores to keep (non franchized ones) depends on such criteria.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Just watched the video and it's my first time seeing it. So I'm going to toss my hat in with the group that says the 2 videos are contradictory. Josh is an example of an extremely bad customer, not bad customer service. Show us how they deal with a bad customer at a fast food chain in the Japan and then it would be considered a balanced comparison.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

just point at the pic and utter the pic number ..............save from causing unnecessary distress to the cute girls behind the counter. it's not that difficult in any country.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Cheeseburger Josh..... Talk about the decline and fall of the west.

I hate to admit this but it was funny watching the black guys just laughing at the Cheeseburger.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

On the topic of Fast Food Service in America, there's no better video to represent it than this video.

WARNING!!!

This video is EXTREMELY Funny but it's a very real place in Chicago. It's a segment from the Conan O'Brien Show.

Jack McBrayer & Triumph Visit Chicago's Weiner's Circle

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33zPlnhymCU

Jack McBrayer of 30 Rock is one of the friendliest, most polite soft spoken individual you could ever hope to meet. Here's a taste of real American service. It's so funny. Don't say I didn't warn you!

Service in Japan is nice, but there's nothing unexpected.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Watched the Chicago's Weiner's Circle video.... You know I think that type of place might just work in Japan too... the novelty of it would be too fun to avoid. I think a lot of wanna be Geinojin would thrive at a place like that. As for fast food in Japan vs USA. They each have their qualities....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Pidestroika, sorry I was just joking. I didn't realise this was such a sensitive matter for you that you would get annoyed at my comment.

Breaking down your conversation, I think maybe you freaked the MS out a little after your first "off the manual" question of asking if there are any seats available. They are really not going to decide for you if you want your food in or out.

Then after that, you said you just want the burger and the fries. Of course they will confirm your order if it's the cheeseburger you mentioned first.

After that, they made the mistake of suggesting you something else, but other than that it is simple confirmation. Nothing to be annoyed of.

And the bit about having a NICE Table after being asked for a smoking or non-smoking seat... I would say just answer the question and let them do their job. If you are really familiar with Japan, I would say, Kuuki wo Yondara?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Watched the Chicago's Weiner's Circle video.... You know I think that type of place might just work in Japan too... the novelty of it would be too fun to avoid.

Well, it would certainly cater to a massive audience if there were nothing but attractive women (and possibly) men behind the counter doing that. Some folks like being called names and being insulted by a pretty face.

@Crystalyle thanks for the link. I've forgotten how awsome Conan O'brien is xD.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites