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First ever Easter Kit Kats in Japan feature 13 types of carrot-flavoured cuteness

14 Comments
By Oona McGee, RocketNews24

Kit Kats in Japan are well-known for their creative designs and flavors, including limited releases for annual events and holidays such as Christmas, Halloween and even the cherry blossom viewing season.

Until now, there was one special holiday that always went unnoticed: Easter. This year, Nestle Japan are releasing their first ever Easter range, with a clever play on words that ties the religious festival to the month of April, the start of the Japanese school and business year.

According to Nestle, Easter is an "ii sutaato," which means “good start” in Japanese. And with these gorgeous apple pie and carrot flavored chocolates on the market, it looks like it’s going to be a very good start indeed.

On sale now for 540 yen, the mini Kit Kats come in a pack of 12 and feature cute bunny packaging.

For the first time in the company’s 42-year history in Japan, bunnies will appear on the chocolates. There will be 13 different designs in total, although it’s not guaranteed that all of them will be in one pack, which means we may have to indulge in a spot of bunny hunting to collect them all.

To top it all off, one in every 30 chocolates will feature this special Lucky Easter design. Unfortunately the only prize for finding this is the actual chocolate itself.

Source: Nestle Japan

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- Limited edition triple-size Lotte pie snack is so popular, we’re unable to get our hands on them -- Bake and feast — We try the new bakeable Kit Kats -- Hot and sweet — these new Kit Kats are ready to be baked!

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14 Comments
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Consumers need more information to make good ethical decisions about what products to purchase and the distant impacts of their actions. This Kit Kat bar may look cute but not taste as sweet if we know how it is made. For example, there is a case against Nestle because it, and some other large chocolate makers, have not fulfilled their promise to make sure their products are not made with slave labour in Africa. Nestle and other companies have tried to say they are not responsible because they do not directly purchase coca from farms that use child slaves (they instead use suppliers who purchase from these farms), but it would be unreasonable to think that they don't know that this practice is part of their chain of supply.

http://www.confectionerynews.com/Manufacturers/Cocoa-child-slavery-case-against-Nestle-ADM-and-Cargill-proceeds

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So, where are the eggs?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We'll never see KitKat products like this in the USA because Hershey has the USA production rights to the product--and Hershey usually likes to keep the product line as simple as possible.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Looks like more and more companies are trying to make some financial gain in a rather quiet season. Last year it was Disney resorts (and I think some other product as well, but can't remember), now we have KitKat, also, what is it with the price, that would be double the usual one?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

We'll never see KitKat products like this in the USA because Hershey has the USA production rights to the product--and Hershey usually likes to keep the product line as simple as possible.

I prefer it that way. I wish companies would just provide quality products for a decent price, instead of trying to make a profit by force-feeding limited editions every 2 weeks.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I prefer it that way. I wish companies would just provide quality products for a decent price

Hershey???? The company whose only response to competition from superior products is to try and ban its rivals?

http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2015/02/16/hershey-ban-rival-chocolates-runs-into-resistance/c7ubBNBTYjCTTmGYSRPF0I/story.html

The Hershey recipe has a lower fat content, a less creamy texture and, British chocolate fans insist, an inferior taste. http://time.com/3683147/cadbury-chocolate-america-britain-hershey/

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Hershey???? The company whose only response to competition from superior products is to try and ban its rivals?

I didn't mention anything about Hershey, although that seems like a simple case of trademark infringement, so let the law decide it.

What I'm against is companies using shock&awe to convince customers to eat their weird concoctions that they have no intention of even continuing.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I didn't mention anything about Hershey

You replied to the comment Hershey has the USA production rights to the product--and Hershey usually likes to keep the product line as simple as possible by saying you preferred it that way.

If there is any copyright infringement, it is on the part of Hershey, who make a vastly inferior product (that cannot legally even be called 'milk chocolate' - it contains no cocoa butter) and try to pass it off as the real thing. Hershey claims on their website that they have 'a license to manufacture Cadbury chocolate products in the United States', but when they change the recipe and keep the same packaging surely they are the ones who are infringing copyright - or at the very least, being downright dishonest.

But Kit Kat - bring it on! As many different flavours and arrangements as possible, please. They're fun, and no one is using 'shock&awe' to convince anyone to buy. My favourite so far has been the maple syrup one, the only one I didn't like was matcha. I'll be keeping an eye out for the bunnies.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You replied to the comment Hershey has the USA production rights to the product--and Hershey usually likes to keep the product line as simple as possible by saying you preferred it that way.

We are getting technical here. I think it is pretty obvious I was just saying I like it simple. That has nothing to do with the quality of Hershey's products. In fact, I haven't eaten any Hershey's chocolate for a long while.

If there is any copyright infringement, it is on the part of Hershey, who make a vastly inferior product (that cannot legally even be called 'milk chocolate' - it contains no cocoa butter) and try to pass it off as the real thing. Hershey claims on their website that they have 'a license to manufacture Cadbury chocolate products in the United States', but when they change the recipe and keep the same packaging surely they are the ones who are infringing copyright - or at the very least, being downright dishonest.

Is there some law you can't change the ingredients after buying the rights to a product? I'm not in the food industry, but I don't see how they are doing anything wrong. If you don't want your product altered, don't sell off the rights begin with. Living in Japan, there is a lot of stuff I can't get easily that I would've had in the states. So sorry if I'm not shedding any tears for these people that can't get their "real" Cadbury eggs.

Btw, I like the Matcha Kit-Kats. Original, "Otona" (dark chocolate) or Matcha are all good in my book. These are consistent with the flavors in other chocolate products. But carrot?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Actually Hershey has the USA licence but adjusted the ingredients, soon you will no longer be able to get imported (UK) anymore as those and other European food imports will be stopped.

Plenty of Hershey in Japan but find US chocolate too sweet. KitKat has been doing special promotions for some time.

As for Easter in Japan I only know it happens because Kaldi and Seijo Ishi stock some importefy Easter choco.

Not sure how this will go as it is a purely Christian celebration and not well known here.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Is there some law you can't change the ingredients after buying the rights to a product?

Depends on the contract. They will write the specifics of if or how much the recipe and ingredients can be changed. After that point it all comes down to contract law.

I'm not in the food industry, but I don't see how they are doing anything wrong.

You also haven't read their contract. Or at least, I'm making that assumption.

If you don't want your product altered, don't sell off the rights begin with.

Or, you can write it in the contract that they cannot alter the product.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Is there some law you can't change the ingredients after buying the rights to a product?

Not that I know of... but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says that what Hershey makes does not fit its definition of milk chocolate. Products once labeled 'milk chocolate' now say 'chocolate candy,' 'made with chocolate' or 'chocolatey.' It's not the same thing at all. Quality? Who needs quality when you've got vegetable oils and corn syrup?

If you don't want your product altered, don't sell off the rights begin with

I don't think it was the original owners of the product/recipe who were complaining, but the customers who were/are being denied the opportunity to buy the product they want, and the importers/retailers who are being prevented from selling what their customers want to buy.

The Haagendaz carrot ice cream was pretty good. I'm willing to give carrot chocolate a try.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yeah. Because nothing says "Easter" like apple pie...

How about just selling chocolate eggs???

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I'm confused. The headline says carrot flavor but the packaging in the picture says Apple pie

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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