Photo: SoraNews24
food

Fukushima peaches: Worthy of the praise given to them by foreign Olympics teams?

13 Comments
By Oona McGee, SoraNews24

Whenever a product gets a bit of attention in Japan for being unusually tasty or delicious, it tends to sell like crazy as people around the country scramble to get a taste of the highly praised flavor.

We’ve seen it happen before with the phantom cheesecake, the croissant gyoza that took a year to arrive, and now it’s the season for Fukushima peaches, which have become a hot item after they were praised by Robert Laing Harrow, head coach of the Australian women’s softball team, and Ken Eriksen, coach of the U.S. women’s softball team.

The peaches eaten by the Australian and U.S. women’s softball teams, which Harrow described as “outstanding,” and Eriksen called “absolutely delicious“, were a variety called Akatsuki, so we set out to purchase a box online.

They were pretty hard to find at a reasonable price and on short notice, as the harvests are sold in limited quantities and postage can be expensive, but we eventually managed to secure a top-quality box of Akatsuki.

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A five-kilogram box contains 18-20 peaches which come direct from farmers associated with Fukushima’s Japan Agricultural Co-operative.

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Opening the box revealed a total of 18 plump peaches inside. They were still firm, which was ideal because the fruit is said to be best left at room temperature for a day or two before eating. According to the information we received, these peaches aren’t suitable for storage in the refrigerator and are best kept in a dark, airy spot so that’s exactly what we did.

After two days, the peaches felt ripe to the touch, so we carefully peeled several of them and cut them up into bite-sized pieces.

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The first thing we noticed was their amazing aroma, which was incredibly sweet and inviting, but then we bit into a piece and were blown away by the delectable sweetness and juiciness. Interestingly, the flesh stayed relatively firm, despite its juicy ripeness, allowing us to keep each piece on the fork without it breaking apart. The texture was just perfect, as the flesh melted on the tongue, leaving the taste buds awash with sweet, fruity flavor.

▼ The firm-yet-soft melt-in-the-mouth texture is a hallmark of this particular variety.

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These had almost no acidity to them — just an overwhelming sweetness, and we could easily see why the U.S. coach said he’d eaten as many as six of them. After another day of ripening, our peaches became even softer and sweeter still, and we couldn’t resist eating even more of them the next day.

After eating half a dozen of these perfectly ripe, juicy sweet peaches, we couldn’t deny that the Akatsuki variety really is worthy of the hype surrounding it. According to the Japan Agricultural Co-operative in Fukushima, the harvest season for Akatsuki lasts until mid-August, so now is definitely the time to take the plunge if you’re wanting to try them.

After reading about the ice creams and snacks that have won the hearts of reporters during the Olympics, it’s nice to finally discover a more healthy option loved by the Olympians at the Tokyo Games.

Related: Rakuten

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Japanese convenience store ice cream wins gold for reporter at the Tokyo Olympics

-- Canadian reporter’s love for 7-Eleven steals the show at Tokyo Olympics

-- We tried Japan’s peach-flavored potato chips, and they do not disappoint in their peachiness

© SoraNews24

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

13 Comments
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They're nice, but like all fruit in Japan, way overpriced. For some reason Japanese people seem to think their fruit (and veg) is the best in the whole world, despite never having even tried stuff from outside Japan.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Normally, a box of 16 peaches sells for about 3,000 yen-5,000 yen at the fruit market.

But when they hit the stores they become more than ¥1,000 for two.

We love peaches but won't pay more than ¥250 each.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Momotaro floated down a river in a peach and was found by an old man and woman.

I love peaches.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

In Europe you can buy similar quality peaches for one euro each.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Looks delicious. I had the good fortune to be born in rural Pennsylvania and could eat as many peaches, cherries, watermelon and fresh corn on the cob as I wanted every summer at very low cost as a kid. We did not peel the peaches but just washed them and ate them whole. Now I live in Tokyo and fruits are available but pricy. I have to say seasonal Japanese fruits are very good as well such as persimmon. In my youth going to fast food was a once a month or so event.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@David Brent

They're nice, but like all fruit in Japan, way overpriced. For some reason Japanese people seem to think their fruit (and veg) is the best in the whole world, despite never having even tried stuff from outside Japan.

This is just a theory but I imagine the reason why some Japanese people think their fruits and vegetables are the best in the world is because they've been conditioned to think so in order to support the domestic market.

In terms of price, Japanese produce cannot compete with foreign produce. So the only way to gain support for domestic produce is to market them as "better," "safer," "more delicious," "cleaner" and of course, "more beautiful." They spend a lot of effort on packaging, finding the the most perfect looking fruits with no blemishes and adding a premium price.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

domestic produce is to market them as "better," "safer," "more delicious," "cleaner" and of course, "more beautiful." 

And all this while Japanese farmers using the chemical filled fertilizer produced in the US supplied to them by Japan Agriculture ( JA )!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

In Australia, the juicy white flesh peaches are about AU$3-4 per kilo, or about ¥300 a kilo. That's at the supermarket, not wholesale price.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I don't understand the peeling thing. Everything peeled, apples, persimmons, peaches, even grapes. And when it comes to watermelons the waste is very high... only the red flesh is eaten, don't dare go near the white edges.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I don't understand the peeling thing. 

Japanese people hate fibre in their diet.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Carlos

I'm anti-peeler but japanese momo needs to be peel. The skin is harder than peaches have in EU. I wouldn't peel grapes for sure, apples and nashi as well but japanese peaches yes.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@David brent

They're nice, but like all fruit in Japan, way overpriced. For some reason Japanese people seem to think their fruit (and veg) is the best in the whole world, despite never having even tried stuff from outside Japan.

well, all the world records like sweetest fruits in the world etc etc led them to that conclusion. Can't blame them can ya...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Japan is really pushing its Fukushima produce.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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