food

Japan’s curious compulsory appetizers

65 Comments
By Philip Kendall Comments

As anyone who has ever entered a Japanese-style pub, or izakaya, will tell you, whether you want it or not, as soon as you’ve ordered some form of alcohol, a small plate or bowl will be placed in front of you alongside your chopsticks and hot towel. The contents of said vessel are almost always a mystery to the customer prior to its arrival; it could be noodles, vegetables, fish or even meat. Sometimes it’s piping hot, sometimes it’s as cold as the ice in your Bill Murray-inspired Suntory whiskey.

Known as お通し (otoshi) or sometimes 突き出し (tsukidashi), this appetizer is given to each and every alcohol-imbibing customer, and sometimes even to those only sipping on soft drinks, regardless of whether you’re drinking at a chain pub or a family owned watering hole. The customer has no say whatsoever in what the snack will be, and even if it remains completely untouched it is added to the bill, costing on average 200-500 yen per head.

The otoshi is a firmly rooted izakaya tradition in Japan, going back generations. While many would rather it didn’t exist at all, it is often used in place of a seating charge, presumably ensuring that even customers who nurse their drinks and get lost in conversation still pay enough to warrant taking up a table. For this reason, it is customary for izakaya staff to introduce the food as otoshi when placing it on the table as a way of avoid situations where customer demands that it be removed from their bill on account of not having ordered it.

Looking at the kanji character used in the word, otōshi can be thought of as literally meaning “passing through” (通る tōru), or to make a path between two places (通す tōsu). This lends weight to notion that the miniature dish was originally intended as something to occupy the customer and keep their hunger at bay between the time they place their order and when their food arrives. Another theory regarding the origin of the word is that, after the waiter or waitress had taken an order, they would return with these small dishes, taken from the kitchen, almost as proof that the order had been properly relayed.

Unlike in the West where people often go to pubs and bars with the sole intention of drinking, it’s still typical in Japan for alcohol to be consumed alongside food, which, when you think about it, probably isn’t the worst idea.

Nevertheless, otoshi is a curious thing. Although on numerous occasions I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the little dish that magically appeared alongside my beer and would have quite happily consumed two or three more of them (were they a little more competitively priced), there have also been plenty of times when I’ve taken one bite of what I was given and promptly slid the dish to the far end of the table, where it remained for much of the evening until I insisted to the waitress that I was quite finished with it. As a Brit, the otoshi system simultaneously confuses and irks me (though not as much as compulsory tipping in bars and restaurants in North America. Can I risk damaging international relations forever by suggesting that you pay your waiting staff a little more from the outset and spare me the chore of doing any form of mental arithmetic while I’m out having fun?), but it’s just one of those things that you have to accept as a part of living in Japan.

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65 Comments
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Not really curious at all....just a way to justify charging you ¥500 or so for the 'sit charge'.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

The author is justifying it as a seating charge but I think of it as some practice decided by some izakaya association to gouge customers. I doubt also that it is truly a custom that goes back generations. You don't have to accept it at all and I suggest you do not. It is a total imposition to expect you to pay for something you did not order and maybe won't like (especially if you are a vegetarian). I would guess too that it is against the law but I am not sure. But some chains "allow" you to refuse it (customer mercy). However, there have been times in the past where the waiter has been prepared to see me leave and forgo perhaps >5,000 yen rather allow me to refuse the tsukidashi. But the manual trumps business acumen in many cases. The amazing thing is how many people seem to imagine it is free.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I agree with the author - some of the ones I've been offered have been absolutely delicious, and I have begged my companions to give me their portion. Their mystery lies in the fact that they all look dodgy, regardless of taste.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

As a Brit, the otoshi system simultaneously confuses and irks me (though not as much as compulsory tipping in bars and restaurants in North America. Can I risk damaging international relations forever by suggesting that you pay your waiting staff a little more from the outset and spare me the chore of doing any form of mental arithmetic while I’m out having fun?), but it’s just one of those things that you have to accept as a part of living in Japan.

Er... no.

This guy must be new here and/or can't speak the language. When you sit down and they come over to take your order, you can just tell them you don't want it. I do all the time. I'm not bothered about paying for it if it's something nice, it's just that 99% of the time, it's something I find revolting.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Unlike in the West where people often go to pubs and bars with the sole intention of drinking

How far back in the past is this author stuck? The vast majority of pubs (if not all) in the UK now serve meals because they can't make money from the sales of drink alone.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

@KariHaruka - You are confusing what pubs and bars serve, with what their customers' intentions are. They are not the same thing at all. The majority of pub visitors stick to a liquid lunch/dinner.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The only rule with those little appetizers is: never wonder what the F** it is! Just eat it!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

For people who are irked by this and refuse it or try not to pay, answer is don't go out. If 200 to 500 yen charge is going to spoil your evening, stay at home and bve miserable.

15 ( +18 / -4 )

Most of the ones I have been given are disgusting - and often not even on the menu. Indeed, a seating charge. I don't visit places that pull this crap anymore. No way should I have to pay for something I didn't order on top of everything else! Free? Great. Charged? Nope.

-14 ( +1 / -15 )

I dont mind the otoshi, in my 20+ years I have rarely seen these anywhere near Y500 usually Y2-300 tops

No big deal, people should try NOT sweating the small stuff, I find its only in the cheap chains that otoshi might not be good.

But then maybe I have been here too long & this practise should outrage me LOL!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I'm with @Probie. Most of the time the 'otoshi' is something unpalatable, so I always refuse it. No waiter has ever told me I have to have it.

@Wakarimasen A few hundred yen isn't going to spoil my evening, but it's a waste of food and money if the takowasabi, or whatever is plonked in front of me, isn't eaten. The izakayas don't care if you then spend a few thousand yen on the rest of your evening.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

The customer has no say whatsoever in what the snack will be, and even if it remains completely untouched it is added to the bill, costing on average 200-500 yen per head

.First off this is an assumption. I havev been to numerous places where there has been ZERO charge for the otoshi.

Also I have to to places as well that have a table or service charge of 500 yen or more regardless and there was no otoshi served either.

His last comments as well, a kind of back handed slap at America's system have nothing to do with the article here and should never have been included in the first place. It's his ignorance about the American system that makes him comment as such.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

I'm o.k with it as long as the ingredients aren't provided by Mitaka Food Services Center.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The only time I've disliked the otoshi is in cheap chains or places that like to cut corners. Mostly otoshi is a small reflection of the menu, so if you go to a place that serves good food, you'll likely get a good otoshi.

For those who like potato fries, cheese balls and kaarage with there beer - then otoshi probably isnt going to be something favourable, as its usually a distinctly Japanese dish.

Why upset the serving staff and kitchen staff so early on in your meal by contesting 250yen.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

I always let the staff know that I prefer edamame as otoshi. Good for the price and goes well with the beer. And no problem getting it in 99% of the cases!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

@hotbertaa

Why upset the serving staff and kitchen staff so early on in your meal by contesting 250yen.

Why not? We are not there to please them or accept their mercy. We are the customers. Jeeeez!

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

I love Otoshi. It shows the personal touch of the chef who is making your food.

4 ( +8 / -2 )

one time in izakaya they gave us raw eggs in a bowl. Even my japanese friend seemed quite clueless as to what we were supposed to do with them :)

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"one time in izakaya they gave us raw eggs in a bowl"

Is that onsen tamago or really raw eggs?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I don't mind otoshi...i would have thought the price of the booze would be more surprising...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I've had really good otoshi and some pretty bad otoshi.

"one time they gave us raw eggs in a bowl"

Heh, that's like when the French give you escargot. They are watching to see if you actually eat it, heh heh

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

one time in izakaya they gave us raw eggs in a bowl. Even my japanese friend seemed quite clueless as to what we were supposed to do with them

A simple way to find out is ask the waiters.

If you were at a Yakitori joint I believe some like to dip the tukune into the yolk. Maybe yo guys weren't looking too go so they gave you the egg to concoct an egg nog (tamagozake).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

First Impressions are Important:

0 ( +0 / -0 )

As a Brit, the otoshi system simultaneously confuses and irks me (though not as much as compulsory tipping in bars and restaurants in North America. Can I risk damaging international relations forever by suggesting that you pay your waiting staff a little more from the outset and spare me the chore of doing any form of mental arithmetic while I’m out having fun?)

Actually tipping is originally an English tradition dating back to 18th century public houses (pubs/bars), and if you wanted your drinks and food then it was pretty much compulsory. Also, when you can't divide by 10 it is a good indicator that you've had enough to drink (hint: just take off a zero).

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The problem is that the places engaging in this practice are generally more interested in selling alcohol than food and being an 'entertainment' establishment rather than an eatery.

For the most part, they suck.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

After I have had a wonderful dinner sometimes would like to having a couple drinks at another place.. maybe just walking down the street... wish I did not have to eat at each place.. not easy to find pubs. The best thing about Japan is the price you see is the price you pay.. I hate tipping.. in Hawaii a Japanese yakitori place adds 18% to the bill and unsuspecting customers sometimes put down another 20% cash tip and the Japanese American staff smirks and says nothing... and arrogant "tip me or else" service in America sucks compared to the worst place I have eaten at in Japan... so fine a few yen for a little pupu with a few beers.. better than free nuts and popcorn.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

@Probie

Which places have you refused these "appetizers" at? I am curious. I would imagine that you have to talk to someone with authority, just just some part-timer working their who will just parrot the usual line.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why not? We are not there to please them or accept their mercy. We are the customers. Jeeeez!

Why go there in the first place then? Why not save EVERYONE a headache and ask the staff upon entering about their policies instead of getting everyone upset and bothered by such a TRIVIAL thing.

Heck if you don't like do go jeeezzz.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I hate tipping.. in Hawaii a Japanese yakitori place adds 18% to the bill and unsuspecting customers sometimes put down another 20% cash tip and the Japanese American staff smirks and says nothing... and arrogant "tip me or else" service in America sucks compared to the worst place I have eaten at in Japan...

Get this while you may not have to tip here in Japan places will rip you off and "smirk" without saying anything here too.

Buyer beware.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Bill Murray-inspired Suntory whiskey

10 years on and dropping this reference is cool yeah.

Can I risk damaging international relations forever by suggesting that you pay your waiting staff a little more from the outset and spare me the chore of doing any form of mental arithmetic while I'm out having fun?

You're a cool guy surely you can do the math. Increased cost of wages equals increased bill. Enjoy.

As a Brit, the otoshi system simultaneously confuses and irks me (though not as much as compulsory tipping in bars and restaurants in North America.

Um, I'm just going to come out and call you a cheapskate who is not to be drunk with.

The otoshi is a firmly rooted izakaya tradition in Japan, going back generations

You recognise this and want to change it. To suit your purse.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

For people who are irked by this and refuse it or try not to pay, answer is don't go out. If 200 to 500 yen charge is going to spoil your evening, stay at home and bve miserable

Seriously.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

The only thing that I didn't like about them is that sometimes are too cold or got seafood on it ^-^;. Anyway, it's fun to try eating new things that you won't find outside Japan^-^.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

The otoshi doesn't bother me at all, if I like the appetizers I'll eat it if not well I just put them aside for the waiter/waiteress to take them away when my drinks are served.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Looks like a few people here like being told what to eat and lack any kind of assertiveness. Well, you will always get what you are given and like it. It is a bit sad really. It makes it worse for everyone in the end.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

This practice is also used in any form of bar you go to, even ones that are not restaurants. A wine bar in Chiba I went to charged 800 for a glass of red, and when I got the bill it was 1300 due to the 3 small crackers in the dish they gave me. I tried reasoning with the owner that I would not likely come back for just an after-work drink again as I am actually being penalized for going to his bar.

His answer?

It's Japanese culture. "Nihon no bunka no hitotsu desu"

True. Overcharging customers who never complain is, indeed, a big part of the culture. I stand corrected. ;)

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Overcharging customers who never complain is, indeed, a big part of the culture.

Exactly. "Who never complain" being the essence of your statement. You mostly get what you are given, and like it or lump it. But when you are charged handsomely for it too, to avoid cognitive dissonance, you convince yourself you are either getting a good product or good service or some intangible reward. And the people fall for such simple psychological tricks every time.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

It makes it worse for everyone in the end.

You know what makes it worse for everyone? Causing trouble over 200 - 500 yen.

If you don't care for how they operate, don't go. You're gonna spend several thousand yen at least, and then argue over 200 - 500 yen? If that makes you feel assertive, I can tell you it just makes you a pain in the.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

A wine bar in Chiba I went to charged 800 for a glass of red, and when I got the bill it was 1300 due to the 3 small crackers in the dish they gave me

You went to a wine bar and are complaining about 500 yen for a side dish. Maybe you should stop going to wine bars.

I tried reasoning with the owner that I would not likely come back for just an after-work drink again as I am actually being penalized for going to his bar

He's probably wondering right now when you're ever going to come back.

Today's lesson for some: Eating and drinking out can be more expensive than you like or deserve.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

You went to a wine bar and are complaining about 500 yen for a side dish

...that hadn't been ordered and wasn't wanted.

If they want to add a seating charge to the bill, fine, let's see it up front. If they want to then provide a small otoshi on the house, fine. If they don't, also fine. If I want a nibble, I'll order it and pay for it.

...Having said that, way back in the day when I was an Engrish teacher and my students used to take me out for drinks and I didn't have to worry about how much the bill was, there was one bar I was often taken to that served otoshi that I never would have thought of ordering but that were absolutely delicious and expanded by repertoire of yummy Japanese nibbles. So you could count the otoshi as part of your education if you haven't been here long - or even if you have, 'cos we're none of us too old to learn.

But I still don't really like the idea of being charged for something I didn't order.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@bruinfan

@Probie. Which places have you refused these "appetizers" at? I am curious. I would imagine that you have to talk to someone with authority, just just some part-timer working their who will just parrot the usual line.

Just told the waiter. It's not such a big thing as to get the manager. I also say to forget the otoshi and bring something I choose from the menu. It's never been a problem.

I don't know why the writer has had such a hard time about it.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Well, you will always get what you are given and like it. It is a bit sad really. It makes it worse for everyone in the end.

"Everyone" being a tiny handful of whiners who have yet to realize which continent they're in.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

But those who say, "Oh, let it slide" are more often than not the same ones who end up doing too much free overtime work or allowing their gaijin cards to be photocopied by those with no right to it or any of a host of violations THEY consider small. But, in the end, their behaviour becomes the de facto standard.

Sure you don't need to go to the izakaya that insists you eat their compulsory food nor the hotel that wants to photocopy your gaijin card but you don't necessarily know first time what they will do. And, I assert, there is no reason why you should put up with something that is almost certainly an imposition and probably bordering on being against the law.

When I first lived in Kyoto 25 years ago, the small (and tasty) izakaya we used to frequent did not give tsukidashi to foreigners and we wondered why. But it was because the occasional foreign visitors had refused. And thanks to them we didn't have to go through the hassle of refusing. But we went back almost every week.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

But it was because the occasional foreign visitors had refused

Visitor: "Our hotel is so beautiful with the tatami and full course meal, the tours we have been on were just great, all the taxi drivers have been so nice too........300 yen? I didn't order that!! And hell will freeze over before I'm violated with such local customs."

Staff: "Uggggggghhhhhhhhhhh. Let's never force this unthinkable practice of otoshi on them again, lest they get more assertive. God I love their money."

0 ( +4 / -4 )

for most chain restaurants you can say you don't want the "otoshi" and you can most certainly ask for something else if what they had in mind for that day is not to your taste. This is Japan, the customer is God. The part timer is not going to complain and they have a manual for them to follow. The last thing they want is somebody tweeting and facebooking negative comments about their facility along with photos.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In other words, give us your money for the privilege of entering our premises and shut up. Another JPs trick to rob your hard earned cash!

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

If they want to add a seating charge to the bill, fine, let's see it up front.

Work that assertiveness. Because that's what Japan is all about, being confrontational.

I would much prefer to receive a, yes pleasant, surprise than for them to come up and grunt, oy, you ave ta pay 300 yen.

300 yen?! Get out of here. I'm never coming back. You'll regret this.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Sorry, but i don't see anything 'confrontational' about wanting to know what's going on. The menu has the prices listed - do you find that confrontational, too? Do you feel the waiter is grunting at you when you pay your bill?

It's possible to be up front with the charges and still produce pleasant surprises for the customer. Without a grunt or a funny accent (can't say I've ever encountered either).

At one end we have the 300-500 yen 'hidden' charge for an otoshi that may or may not be a pleasant surprise; at the other we have those bars that charge champagne prices for juice consumed by hostesses regardless of whether the customer has offered the hostess a drink, where the bill can run up to six figures in a couple of hours. Where do you draw the line at hidden charges?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Where do you draw the line at hidden charges?

On the ground outside the entrance, in chalk.

It's not a hidden charge if it is to be expected. It might freak out the tourist who is here for the first time, but it's certainly not news to anyone who lives here. You know they will provide otoshi, which could be equated with a seating charge. In my experience it has typically been around 300 yen or so, and I'm certainly not going to create an awkward moment over that, cos well that just sucks, and I'm gonna spend 10 times that anyway. If the otoshi costs more than that, chances are you're in a slightly more upmarket izakaya; again a place you should not be going if you're going to create problems over 10 percent or so of the bill. Stay home.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

I had a beer in a Bar that had 'no price list'. One beer' My bill was 3500 yen! Like I said, 'NO RULES' on pricing, 'NO FAIR TRADING ACT' = 'JPs trick to rob your hard earned cash!

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

at the other we have those bars that charge champagne prices for juice consumed by hostesses regardless of whether the customer has offered the hostess a drink, where the bill can run up to six figures in a couple of hours

Yeah those places can hurt your wallet. The upsales pressure there is very different from a one-off 300 yen appetizer though; very different place and irrelevant to this discussion.

But again, the answer is, you don't have to go, much less go back. You don't even have to stay in Japan. If the system you grew up with is so awesome you can always go back and immerse yourself in that again.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Yes, we get it. You're not a skinflint. You don't mind paying for something you haven't ordered because you're going to pay a whole lot more anyway on your night out, and anyone who doesn't share your deep understanding of Japan should just Get Out. Congratulations on avoiding confrontation there.

sheesh

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

sheesh it is a few hundred yen

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Yes, we get it.

Just who do you think this "we" is?

and anyone who doesn't share your deep understanding of Japan

Please. Sorry if I haven't been here for 60 years. I would hope though that someone as my-way-is-right as you are might bend a little here and there to follow local practices.

And yes, I'm not going to be a cheapskate, insist on not following the established procedure over 300 yen, and make everyone wish I would just leave.

My goodness.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

sheesh it is a few hundred yen

I don't think that matters for the my-way-is-right crowd.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I agree that it can feel a bit unfair to pay for a spoonful of stuff you may or may not like but on the other hand I think Daijoboots also has a point. Thats just how things work here and not worth getting upset about...who wants stomach ulcers over sweating small stuff.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Plus, as a visitor to any country, you should be prepared for stuff like this happening. It doesn't warrant explanation because they are catering to the locals - who know the system has been in place. Heck spend a week here and you will notice.

Not happy to tip 20% eating in the US but its customary so I am not going to commplain. Life is too short to be a tightwad about stuff like this.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

sheesh it is a few hundred yen

I don't think that matters for the my-way-is-right crowd.

Well we're talking opinions here, so there is no right or wrong. I asked earlier where one would draw the line between 'It isn't that much, just pay and enjoy your evening' and 'I'm being ripped off'. Daijoboots is happy paying ¥300~¥500 for his otoshi. How far does it go? Is ¥800 OK? ¥1,000? ¥2,000? More?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

How far does it go? Is 800 OK? 1,000? 2,000? More?

I don't think there's much point in trying to choose a number. There is, after all, no right or wrong answer, right? Although I'm sure there's a number where the my-way-is-right folk would object. That it is as low as 300 yen would suggest they shouldn't be eating/drinking out in the first place.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There is, after all, no right or wrong answer, right? Although I'm sure there's a number where the my-way-is-right folk would object. That it is as low as 300 yen would suggest they shouldn't be eating/drinking out in the first place.

It was a simple request for information. You obviously have a very low opinion of people who are careful with ¥300: so what would your limit be? Come on, don't be shy; there's no right or wrong answer. :-) No one's going to accuse you of being a tightwad or demand you slink off back home.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

You obviously have a very low opinion of people who are careful with Y300

Haha. Obviously, my-way-is-right cleo. No I can save 300 yen in choices made every day just like anyone else. I do have a low opinion however of the cheapskate foreigner who after making the decision to go out drinking and eating, would choose to make this time when the otoshi comes out. A much better idea would be to order one less item, food or drink. But if the cheapskate foreigner kicks up a big enough fuss about it, as highlighted in the Kyoto case above, they start to receive special treatment. Oh and they are special.

Come on, don't be shy; there's no right or wrong answer

There is a right answer actually now that I think about it. It's the amount the shop asks for. The only person that would refuse that is the cheapskate foreigner trying to get the best of both worlds; eating/drinking out but not playing by the rules.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Not happy to tip 20% eating in the US but its customary so I am not going to commplain. Life is too short to be a tightwad about stuff like this

Here here.

Kicking up a fuss about it in the U.S. will lead to quite a different reaction too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Tipping is not relevant to this discussion. Please stay on topic.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Well we're talking opinions here, so there is no right or wrong. I asked earlier where one would draw the line between 'It isn't that much, just pay and enjoy your evening' and 'I'm being ripped off'. Daijoboots is happy paying ¥300~¥500 for his otoshi. How far does it go? Is ¥800 OK? ¥1,000? ¥2,000? More?

What's the relevance of that? The otoshi is, by general agreement, 500 yen or less at the great majority of places. It isn't 2000 yen. If it's something that specifically bothers you, you can ask at each restaurant before you order how much the otoshi is going to cost.

Fighting this custom is absurd: in some countries you have tipping, in some countries you pay double for a coffee if you want to sit down to drink it, in some countries you have a service charge. You could fight all of those "unfair" charges, but what would be the point? They're all for things you didn't specifically order, but they're all just ways that restaurants, bars and coffee shops do business.

The otoshi is the cheapest of any of these charges, because it's static regardless of what you order.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

There have been some good points made, but the situation that irked me most about this scenario was a "restaurant-bar" pace in the residential neighborhood I moved into a couple of years ago.

My wife and I, with our 1-year old son, decided to stop in one night to try the home made pasta.

I ordered a beer with dinner because I felt bad about being their only customer and the fact that they were advertising themselves as a "restaurant-bar" or whatever.

The bill for the tsukidashi was 900 yen x2. The 1800 yen total in that case, when we were just dropping by to have some pasta that cost about 1000 yen a plate or so, amounted to almost half of the bill.

It's not that great a travesty, but I don't patronize places like that, especially when they are located in residential neighborhoods.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Maybe I'm remembering that total wrong, as it was as much the overall experience as the money.

That place has since switched from pasta to chicken, with no success other than people who seem to be connected to them somehow--not many local customers.

There have been a number of such places setting up shop and trying to turn this nice neighborhood into some sort of entertainment district, with basically no success or patronage from the locals.

Anyway, I don't mind the tsukidashi under the right circumstances, especially when the dishes are good.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

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