food

Japanese KitKats swap plastic bags for paper packaging with new origami feature

4 Comments
By Oona McGee, SoraNews24

With flavors that range from sake to plum wine and even cough drop, KitKats have become the go-to souvenir of choice for many travelers around the world, but now there’s a reason for everyone to fall in love with them even more.

Starting from the end of this September, Nestlé Japan will be making a big change to the look of their KitKat range, by saying sayonara to their plastic packaging.

▼ Glossy plastic packaging on the right, new-look paper packaging on the left.

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By switching to paper packaging, Nestle expects to save 418 tons of plastic every year. It’s all part of the company’s commitment to only use 100-percent recyclable and reusable packaging by 2025.

The new paper packaging will be appearing on five of the brand’s larger sized products, specifically the KitKat Mini Original…

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▼ The KitKat Mini Otona no Amasa (Adult Sweetness)…

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▼ The KitKat Mini Otona no Amasa Matcha…

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▼ And the KitKat Mini Otona no Amasa Strong Matcha.

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The convenience-store exclusive KitKat Mini Original packs will also be given an all-paper makeover.

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To help customers get used to the new-look packets, Nestlé is encouraging people to use them to make paper cranes, which they can write messages on and then give to their family and friends.

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This origami feature is a nice touch that really drives home the message of reusing and recycling materials, which Nestlé hopes to expand to other products in their range soon.

It also ties in nicely with KitKat’s good luck connection in Japan, as the origami cranes can be used to wish family and friends good luck on their exams and in their working lives, as “kitto katsu” translates to “will surely win”.

Source: Nestlé Japan

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- New Japanese KitKats combine mint, peach and rum for a summertime taste sensation

-- Japanese KitKats get fresh with new peach rum mint flavour this summer

-- New Japanese KitKats combine ruby chocolate with everyday nuts and cranberry

© SoraNews24

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

4 Comments
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Good for them.

But I wonder if the Kit Kats inside the paper packaging, are individually wrapped in plastic or paper, or are they gasp unwrapped?

Naysayers of all individual efforts to reduce the use of/ purchase of single-use plastics, always complain that in order to have any effect, the companies have to make the effort to change, not people.

Well, here is one company doing just that. Let's hope others will follow.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Fantastic, it will be like being a little boy again.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

“But I wonder if the Kit Kats inside the paper packaging, are individually wrapped in plastic or paper, or are they gasp unwrapped?”

If they are unwrapped, those origami cranes are going to have melted chocolate and crumbs on the inner side.....then people will need to use another precious resource like water or wet tissues to clean the package before folding the crane...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The question is, what do you do with the paper cranes after you made it?

paper actually has a higher carbon footprint than plastics etc.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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