Photo: SoraNews24
food

Mos Burger’s new French toast: A delicious breakfast with a side of linguistic challenges

14 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

Mos Burger is a great place to go for a hamburger, as it’s right there in the fast food chain’s name, after all. But if you can get yourself out of bed and into a Mos Burger branch by 10:30 a.m., they’ve got a special breakfast menu, and our reporter Mr Sato woke up nice and early to try out its newest item.

About a year ago, Mos Burger started selling sliced bread, getting in on the recent premium bread boom that’s been going on in Japan. As of March 24, though, Mos has also been using this fluffy, thick-sliced bread to make French toast, and that’s what Sato was having for breakfast.

First, though, he had to order it. That might not seem like much of a challenge, but Sato, gourmand that he is, wanted to use the full official name for the product, which is: French Toast We Made with Bread with Such a Rich Flavor that You’ll Want to Say “I Probably Don’t Need to Add Any Butter” Out Loud.

As for why the name is so long, the sliced bread that Mos sells is itself called Bread with Such a Rich Flavor that You’ll Want to Say “I Probably Don’t Need to Add Any Butter” Out Loud, in keeping with the style of sliced bread specialty bakeries in Japan having long, light novel-esque names.

▼ If you’re ordering in Japanese, the French toast is called “Bata Nante Iranai Kamo to Omowazu Koe ni Dashitakunaru Hodo Noko na Shokupan de Tsukutta Furenchi Tosuto”…or you can just point to its picture on the menu.

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First off, it looks gorgeous. Mos’ French toast is a mouthwatering golden color, mottled with the perfect quantity of darker flecks where the bread was browned. From the first glance, you can tell it’s going to be moist and fluffy, and the eggy goodness on its way to his taste buds gave Mr. Sato a smile right at the start of his day.

The French toast costs 250 yen by itself, but Sato decided to satisfy his caffeine cravings by adding a cup of coffee as part of a 410-yen drink set. He also opted for a 40-yen packet of syrup. Honestly, he couldn’t help feeling it was kind of strange that syrup isn’t included as a freebie when you order the French toast, but maybe they charge you extra for it because it’s just that good?

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Not able to resist any longer, Sato sliced off a bite with the side of his fork, popped it into his mouth, and was happy, though not surprised, to find the French toast was everything he’d expected it to be: moist, soft, and delicious, with a gentle sweetness that seemed to grow and spread across his palate as he chewed.

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However, this is where he got his first surprise of the taste test. Sure, the syrup was sweet, and he guessed it sort of enhanced the eating experience, but it didn’t really have the full maple flavor he’d expected. Actually, it reminded him more of mizuame, the sticky sugar syrup you’ll find on candied apples and strawberries sold at festivals in Japan.

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The confusion is cleared up, though, if you take another look at the menu, which lists the syrup as…

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…"maple-style syrup,” (メープル風シロップ), as opposed to “maple syrup” (which would be メープルシロップ). And just like Mr. Sato’s taste receptors had told him, the packet lists mizuame as the first ingredient, with maple syrup third on the list.

It’s not like mizuame tastes bad or anything, but the less pronounced maple notes of the “maple-stye syrup” were just enough of a mental disconnect that Sato thinks you’re probably better off without it, since Mos’ French toast is delicious enough to stand on its own without any extra condiments. Not only will that save you 40 yen, it’ll save you the trouble of having to tack “and a packet of maple-style syrup too” onto the end of “I’d like the French Toast We Made with Bread with Such a Rich Flavor that You’ll Want to Say ‘I Probably Don’t Need to Add Any Butter’ Out Loud.”

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- We make delicious French toast using a LOT of Japanese custard pudding

-- Mos Burger’s sauce-soaked Wet Burger sure is wet, but is it worth your burger bucks? 【Taste test】

-- We made world-famous French toast in our office, and so can you! 【RocketKitchen】

© SoraNews24

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

14 Comments
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Sorry, but delicious doesn't come to mind looking at that sorry piece of white toast soaked in who knows what.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Premium bread boom in Japan.....errr where? I must've missed that because all I see is crappy white bread

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Agreed @bass4funk9:23a. Why would people in Japan put their health at risk and waste what limited money they may have for a breakfast set possibly saturated in chemicals and drenched in overpriced ‘syrup’(?) ?

Many of Japan’s chain cafe’s, like Kansai & Chubu’s Komeda Coffee offer more nutritious ‘Morning Sets’, including coffee, choices of toast with choices of real butter, fruit jam, anko bean paste and a boiled egg and green salad on the side for about the same money.

. . .

4 ( +6 / -2 )

It looks pretty good, given that Japanese restaurants are generally pretty awful when it comes to breakfast. Expect hot dogs, hamburgers, potato salad, and of course big bowls of plain white rice. LOL.

The MOS in my neighbourhood opens at 9, which is kinda late for me. (Denny's opens at 7.) The morning menu doesn't seem to show fruit juice or any other items that would make it more nutritional.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

I can't abide by that kind of syrup, usually referred to as "pancake syrup" in the US. It's just artificially-flavored corn sugar syrup, for the most part. Yuck.

There's just no comparison to real maple syrup. Thank you Canada!!! (and for ice hockey, too.)

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Sugary bread and high fructose corn syrup?

I'm good.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Lol that's some of the saddest, soggiest bread I've ever seen. Labeling it "French Toast" is just adding to the insult. Japan desperately needs to up its bread game for the bread they are currently churning out is just gods awful.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Butterless and with Syrup. That is neither tasty nor for health.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Why the hate? It is absolutely not healthy and super sweet for breakfast, but as French toast goes, those photos look good.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

For 250 yen I can buy an entire loaf of bread. I have eggs and maple syrup at home already, and no, I won't say out loud "I probably don't need butter on it" because FRENCH TOAST.

I often wonder why people bother to eat things like this when you can cook better and far cheaper at home? Hmm.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Why the hate? 

Read the posts. The posters are pretty specific about what they see as problems and limitations with this new offering.

If MOS decided to open at 7 a.m. and offer a "morning set" of two eggs fried the way you want them, fresh fruit, choice of bacon or sausage, whole grain toast and free refill coffee, you'd get no complaints from me. Even an equivalent of an Egg McMuffin would be progress.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

250 yen for 'half' a piece of bread????!!!!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

sorry, half a slice of bread.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

girl_in_tokyoToday  07:21 am JST

For 250 yen I can buy an entire loaf of bread. I have eggs and maple syrup at home already, and no, I won't say out loud "I probably don't need butter on it" because FRENCH TOAST. 

I often wonder why people bother to eat things like this when you can cook better and far cheaper at home? Hmm.

A small maple syrup in a plastic bottle costs 700-900 yen; so with your bread and eggs your'e talking 1300-1500 yen. That means you can get the French toast at Mos Burger about 5 times for the same cost. And you don't have to wash the dishes (save hot water).

So, if you are going to make French toast 5 times a week (bread doesn't last much longer) I say go for it!

For me, if I want something homemade, I will just have one of the willing come over and cook for me. Even bring me coffee.

And clean up too.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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