food

No more burgers and coke? Climate fears hit meat, drink sales

7 Comments

Consumers worried about the environment are cutting their spending on meat and bottled drinks and trying to reduce plastic waste, and this trend is set to accelerate as climate concerns mount, a global survey shows.

About a third of people surveyed in 24 countries in Europe, Latin America and Asia are alarmed about the environment, with half of those - or 16% of the global total - taking active steps to reduce their imprint.

"We’re already seeing small reductions in spending on meat, bottled drinks and categories such as beauty wipes," data analytics firm Kantar said in a report on the survey.

"As markets get wealthier, the focus on issues of environmentalism and plastics increases. In the future, we could expect to see the share of 'eco active' shoppers rising in countries that experience growing gross domestic product."

The poll of more than 65,000 people showed that consumers in western Europe were most likely to seek to reduce their environmental impact, while a majority of the population in Asia and Latin America has little to no interest in the issue.

Chile is the exception in Latin America and the country with the most environmentally engaged consumers in the world, with 37% of those surveyed actively taking trying to make a change.

Austria and Germany have the next most concerned shoppers, with Britain not far behind, Kantar said, predicting that sales of fresh meat in Britain could drop by up to 4% in the next two years if environmentalism keeps spreading.

"Our study shows there is high demand for eco-friendly products that are competitively priced and readily available."

The U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said last month that global meat consumption must fall to curb global warming and that plant-based foods could contribute to reducing emissions of carbon dioxide.

There has been an explosion of companies offering alternatives to meat, such as California-based Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, while food giants like Nestle are also launching plant-based burgers.

Kantar said 48% of shoppers want consumer goods companies to do more to cut plastic waste.

It noted that dozens of companies - including giants like Nestle, Coca-Cola, Unilever, Walmart and Carrefour - have signed a pledge to make their packaging reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.

© (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2019.

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

7 Comments
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The real negative impact that the over-crowded, bloated, devil-may-care meat industry has on the environment is something it seems most North Americans either don't know or refuse to even look into or believe. I am surprised the article dodged that point so hard. From a wildly inflated cow population fed a completely unnatural diet and the ridiculous amounts of methane that produces, to piles and piles of feces running off in the rain and getting into your vegetables days before its picked to having way too few trees because the land is used to grow animal feed....the meat industry is killing us.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I agree N. Goodman, and I see the root cause of this is the equally inlafted human population that fights off natural controls with science and pollutes the environmant with that same science.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

"We’re already seeing small reductions in spending on meat, bottled drinks and categories such as beauty wipes," data analytics firm Kantar said in a report on the survey.

Small reductions in spending on meat probably co-related to the increase in the price of red meat, secondly the amount of fish being consumed is increasing, consumers are probably replacing higher priced red meat with fish.

There has been an explosion of companies offering alternatives to meat, such as California-based Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, while food giants like Nestle are also launching plant-based burgers.

And its already starting to be proven these so called "healthy" alternatives are full of salt and other health depleting substances.

predicting that sales of fresh meat in Britain could drop by up to 4% in the next two years

The word here is COULD, like most hysteria being pushed about the environment this statement could well and truly being another exaggeration.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

these so called "healthy" alternatives are full of salt and other health depleting substances.

While some folk might mistakenly think some kind of mass-produced, highly-processed pseudo-food is somehow 'healthier' than real food, the gist of the article isn't about people wanting a healthy diet, it's about people not wanting to muck up the environment any more than we already have done.

like most hysteria being pushed about the environment this statement could well and truly being another exaggeration

Oh I see, you're one of those. Sorry, I thought you were being serious.

Invalid CSRF

6 ( +7 / -1 )

And I have been getting interested in the carnivore diet; haven't adopted it but I am eating more meat than I used to, and I certainly plan to continue...

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

There is No way on God’s green Earth that I would ever give up eating meat, but if people want to, their choice and that’s just more meat for me. I will cut down on my veggie intake that’s my contribution for the environment.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

There is No way on God’s green Earth that I would ever give up eating meat

Lets see what you say when the Earth turns more desert tan than green.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

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