Photo: Shikishima Baking Co., Ltd. | © CoCooking Co., Ltd. | © DayBreak Co., Ltd.
food

Prevent food waste by enjoying these delicious fruit pastries from Paul Bakery in Japan

8 Comments
By Ben K, grape Japan

Due to the spread of the novel coronavirus infection, food waste has become a serious problem in Japan.

Global French bakery chain PAUL (operated in Japan by Shikishima Baking Co Ltd) on Feb 25 announced a collaborative campaign with two companies interested in reducing food waste: HenoHeno, which provides frozen fruits, and TABETE, a food sharing service allowing customers to "rescue" surplus or unpurchased items from shops and vendors.

The three companies have teamed up to develop more than 10 original items that will help you reduce food waste just by purchasing them.

The first item in the lineup is the "Setouchi Lemon Pie" made with Setouchi lemons.

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Photo: Shikishima Baking Co., Ltd.

These delicious pies make use of so-called "imperfect produce," fruits that are grown the same way and taste the same as other fruits, but are not sold because they don't meet size standards or have small imperfections.

The Setouchi Lemon Pie is baked with honey-soaked lemons, custard cream, and almond cream for an authentic French taste.

Just by eating baked goods made from delicious fruits that would otherwise have "nowhere to go," you can contribute to the reduction of food waste, which is a great initiative.

These special baked goods using imperfect fruits will be available at Japanese PAUL stores nationwide and change on a monthly basis.

Later this month, the featured fruit will be Amanatsu 甘夏, a popular hybrid citrus fruit grown in Japan with a sweet and refreshing taste.

Here is the schedule for this year:

Spring: Amanatsu citrus, strawberry, cherry

Summer: pineapple, mango, peach

Fall: grape (cultivar unspecified), Delaware grape, apple

Winter: pear, lemon

Products are subject to change depending on the harvest conditions of the fruits.

At the time of writing, these pies are sold at most PAUL locations but they will only be available while supplies last, so if you're interested, head to your local PAUL bakery.

Name: 瀬戸内レモンパイ Setouchi Lemon Pie

Price: 380 yen (tax included)

Availability: 26 stores from Sapporo to Fukuoka (some exceptions may apply)

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© grape Japan

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

8 Comments
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These delicious pies make use of so-called "imperfect produce," fruits that are grown the same way and taste the same as other fruits, but are not sold because they don't meet size standards or have small imperfections.

Is the implication that this imperfect fruit is rejected by food processors?

I don't buy this for a second, Pasco. More greenwash?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

too overpriced to be short and frank.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"imperfect produce," fruits that are grown the same way and taste the same as other fruits, but are not sold because they don't meet size standards or have small imperfections.

In the UK before we joined the EU and rules like these came into force, apples and other fruit and veg was sold by the weight and came in different sizes and shapes.

Odd funny shaped like carrots with two leg was sold.

Smaller and larger apples sold by weight, now (even after leaving the EU) the EU size rules are still applied.

Now any fruit or veg not to EU standards is used in tins or pies.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Price: 380 yen

For that price I want to eat the fruit which meets the proper size and has no imperfections.

If it was 180 yen i might consider eating imperfect fruit but since it is more expensive than my local bakery I will Just continue getting my baked goods from them.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

While traveling around Europe whilst a college kid, I of course attempted to sample as much of the food as possible. I have had many wonderful pastries in my life, but the most amazing pastry that I ever tasted was an apple strudel in Germany. Words cannot do it justice.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I always thought of Paul as the McDonald bakery of France, you can find it everywhere, and reasonably priced. In Japan, there was one Paul near my house, but to my surprise it was among the most expensive bakeries around!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

On the subject of apples, our family grew and sold them in the old country, before emigrating to the States. Each tree and each apple was lovingly cared for. When sold, each apple was wrapped individually.

The apples were for export only, as they were of such high quality, and fetched such a high price in Germany, that only bruised apples were consumed locally.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

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