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Receive a selection of sake in your mailbox each month with SAKE POST

8 Comments
By Connie Sceaphierde, grape Japan

For sake lovers, being in Japan is both a blessing and a curse – while there are unlimited numbers of brands to taste and try, the truth is, the hundreds of different varieties stocking the shelves can at times be so overwhelming that we find ourselves skulking out of the store without having purchased anything. On other occasions, the large selection to choose from can be so tempting that we end up spending more yen than we had originally anticipated.

Despite these downfalls, Japan is obviously the best place to be when it comes to being a sake fan, and, with the introduction of SAKE POST, there is now a way to savor a monthly rolling selection of sake without breaking a sweat or the bank.

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SAKE POST aims to share the produce of local Niigata-based sake breweries with individuals across Japan through a changing monthly collection sent in the post.

Sign up to SAKE POST and each month you will receive 3 brands of local Niigata sake in your mailbox. Every delivery comes with three original SAKE POST pouches filled with 100ml of sake, which can then be poured into a drinking vessel of your choosing to compare and enjoy.

With an introduction of different brands every month, you can look forward to discovering new flavors of Niigata.

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There are two plans to choose from at SAKE POST.

Regular Liquor Plan – 1,210 yen per month

Consisting of everyday sake loved by Niigata locals, this plan introduces the charm and characteristics of the breweries involved. Included are liquors that fall into the following categories; honjozo sake (rice polish rate 70% or less, contains additional brewing alcohol), junmai sake (rice polish rate 70% or less, does not contain additional brewing alcohol), futsushu/table sake (rice polish rate between 70 – 93%, low-grade sake).

Premium Liquor Plan – 1,980 yen per month

This plan contains luxurious, high quality sake that you would usually only enjoy at special events and occasions. Included are a selection of sake that fall into the following categories; Ginjo Sake (polished to at least 60%, may contain additional brewing alcohol), Junmai Ginjo (polished to at least 60%, and free from additional brewing alcohol), Daiginjo (Polished to at least 50%, may contain additional brewing alcohol), Junmai Daiginjo (polished to at least 60%, does not contain additional brewing alcohol).

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Not just a drinking experience, SAKE POST allows you to post and compare your reviews of each sake on a shared members database. Accessed by a QR code included with each delivery, you can see the impressions of others about the liquor in comments and on a graph.

Additionally, you can send your thoughts of the sake you drank directly to the sake brewery, who do not regularly get the chance to hear personal impressions of their brew straight from the customer. In the future SAKE POST hopes that they will be able to narrow the gap and deepen the relationship between customers and sake breweries.

To sign up for a selection of sake delivered straight to your door each month, head on over to the official SAKE POST website.

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© grape Japan

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

8 Comments
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To bad it is not international. They could get new fans and customers for exports.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The best sake I had was from Niigata when I held an exhibition at a sake museum. Premium sake at ¥15,000 a bottle.

80% of sake is made in Kobe.

Just 300ml of sake per month for ¥1,210 or ¥1,980.

Sundays we usually eat sushi and drink sake which we buy for less than ¥1,000 for 750 ml bottle.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

SAKE POST aims to share the produce of local Niigata-based sake breweries with individuals across Japan through a changing monthly collection sent in the post.

This is not a bad business model, but liability issues could arise.

This could be very dangerous, because teenagers would have access to these alcoholic beverages.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

This could be very dangerous, because teenagers would have access to these alcoholic beverages

Determined teens will always get alcohol if they really want it. From an older brother or sister, a cool Aunt or Uncle. There are ways and means and as a young teen I managed to get it when I wanted it on week ends. Teens are resourceful and modern teens have help through tech that we never had in my day.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

...the hundreds of different varieties [of sake] stocking the shelves can at times be so overwhelming that we find ourselves skulking out of the store without having purchased anything. On other occasions, the large selection to choose from can be so tempting that we end up spending more yen than we had originally anticipated...

Despite these downfalls....

The vacillating mental state of the writer/customer is only a downfall for that individual. One solution to such chronic indecision is to seek out a sake bar and over time begin sampling and making note of the brands one prefers. Then buy those from the stores.

Or, if viable, visit local breweries to sample their line up and proactively support local businesses by purchasing from them.

That said, the subscription service is another alternative for the easily overwhelmed consumer. Even so, a large selection of sake in a Japanese store can't be called a "downfall" or a reason which makes such a service any better than the other options.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

We only buy single sakes, not ones mixed with other sakes. We also prefer dry.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Sake sales have plummeted during Covid-19 more than other alcoholic beverages, behind wine, shochu, whiskey, and beer.

Overall domestic consumption of sake has been declining even before the pandemic.

This new marketing ploy will likely fail, as consumption of chu-hi and beer-like beverages grow, and further force the sake market into a smaller corner.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Determined teens will always get alcohol if they really want it.

Sshh! We don't want them to know that we know.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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