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Who invented butter chicken? Indian judge to rule on dispute over global favourite

39 Comments
By Arpan Chaturvedi and Aditya Kalra

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39 Comments
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I need to sample the contestants on this curry war.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

It's well known in Delhi's culinary circles that Kundan Lal Gujral and Kundan Lal Jaggi both were inventors of the dish and partners in Moti Mahal.

However, seems that the Gujrals have totally removed Jaggi's name and refuse to give him any credit after they parted ways.

https://motimahal.in/our-story

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The list of illustrious guests at Moti Mahal include Richard Nixon and Justin Trudeau.

Considering that both turned out to be against India for different reasons, could it be that the Butter Chicken that they had over there gave them the Delhi Belly?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

From Pad Thai through Chilli Crab to Butter Chicken, it's quite interesting how recently many "traditional dishes" saw the light of day.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Butter chicken curry is a favorite we make frequently. Butter garlic naan bread I have never tried. Sounds good.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Wallace

Yummy, it’s lovely isn’t it. I’m making chicken korma tonight, it’s my partners favourite you see.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

It was invented in Pakistan before the Indian continent was divided.

Pakistanis tend to make much better Pak/Indian dishes and I prefer to eat in Pakistani resaurants than Indian because of the quality of the food made.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Never heard of butter chicken till I came to Japan. I usually have a nice Dal Ruby Murray with me' missus when out and about. I'm set in my ways you see.

Korma is what the kiddies like if they have a cat's tongue and can't take hot. it's also not very nice at all. A good green curry beats the yucky korma easily.

But curry is very colonial anyway, liked by the old fashioned expats holding onto something for nothing. Give me a good マーボー豆腐 any day. Lovely jubbly Rodders.!.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Chicken Tikka Masala is the most popular curry dish in the UK. That is the same as Butter Chicken Curry in India.

Other names for Chicken Butter Curry are Chicken Makhani and Murgh Makhani.

The Japanese love their curries too.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

The Japanese love their curries too.

Indeed. Typically Japanese curry is less spicy and fairly sweet compared to Indian curry. Japanese curry is darker in color whereas Indian curry is usually very earthy in color.

Indian curries uses lots of garamasala and other wide variety of spices which gives a nice flavor. The base of Japanese curry is hearty and peppery. Also, Japanese curries are thin in consistency as compared to Indian curry. But not as a rule

I prefer homemade Japanese curry. My local ramen joint used to do a good one (can you believe it.?.) but I moved house.

Tell them about the Japanese navy and curry. It's a good yarn.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

If it uses a meat product then it's likely to be a Muslim dish. Most Indian dishes such as (Hindu/Buddhist/Jain...) rarely use meat at least historically. Curry itself is also a South Indian concept.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

So "Butter Chicken" would most likely be a Muslim Indian invention (or recent invention by Non-Muslims).

A curry would most likely be a South Indian or Western/Asian invention.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Chicken Tikka Masala is the most popular curry dish in the UK. That is the same as Butter Chicken Curry in India.

Both dishes are actually different.

https://alcoeats.com/blogs/main-dishes/butter-chicken-vs-tikka-masala-how-are-they-different

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

If it uses a meat product then it's likely to be a Muslim dish. Most Indian dishes such as (Hindu/Buddhist/Jain...) rarely use meat at least historically.

LOL your Muslim obsession again.

Butter Chicken was invented by KL Gujral and KL Jaggi in their restaurant Moti Mahal, both of whom were Punjabi Hindus who migrated from Pakistan to India after Partition.

Many Hindus are non-vegetarian, and North Indians love Mughlai cuisine. Just try asking a Bengali Hindu to go without fish for a few days.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Chicken tikka masala is most likely based on butter chicken, originally known as murgh makhani. Both dishes were popularised outside of India – butter chicken in the U.S. and tikka masala in the U.K. In fact, tikka masala was most likely invented in the U.K., either in Birmingham, London or Glasgow.

https://www.greedygourmet.com/this-vs-that/butter-chicken-vs-tikka-masala/#:~:text=Chicken%20tikka%20masala%20is%20most,in%20Birmingham%2C%20London%20or%20Glasgow.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

In fact, tikka masala was most likely invented in the U.K., either in Birmingham, London or Glasgow

No. It was Bradford.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@Wallace

A lot of the dishes in the western world are actually by Pakistanis (a fusion of both Indian and Middle Eastern cuisines), or Bangladeshis. They tend to contain different spices and much more meat. It might be odd to describe them as Indian.

In East Asia a lot of the Indian dishes are from Nepal and Myanmar, or historically from the South of India through colonialism.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

@EvilBuddha For goodness sake stop arguing against established facts.

That's because fish isn't considered meat by some Indians. It's also true in most coastal areas of South India, and islands such as Sri Lanka and the Maldives, that fish is a staple of the diet. Hinduism always says that meat is okay if no alternative is available (as does Buddhism).

The vast majority of Hindus are vegetarian and especially so in history when most of Indian cuisine was developed. Any meat dishes are highly likely to be Muslim. It's a fact of South Asian cuisine.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

The vast majority of Hindus are vegetarian

Yeah because you say so.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diet_in_Hinduism

https://lifestyle.livemint.com/amp/news/talking-point/a-majority-of-hindus-are-non-vegetarian-as-they-have-always-been-111634488209199.html

More informed sources than yourself prove otherwise.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@EvilBuddha You obviously read too much NYT and BBC. The problem lies with the wording of the question, because the western concept of vegetarianism is more strict that the Indian concept. Indian idea asks you to prefer vegetarian food as much as possible.

So if you actually ask the right questions:

https://www.pewresearch.org/short-reads/2021/07/08/eight-in-ten-indians-limit-meat-in-their-diets-and-four-in-ten-consider-themselves-vegetarian/

The majority Hindus are vegetarian. I am also a vegetarian but I will eat meat if nothing else is available.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Notice the Toon village idiot has to make vulgar remarks about my comments as usual, this time directed at my partner, unforgivable.

Love to bump into Cyril Smith Jr one day.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

The majority Hindus are vegetarian.

If you bother going through the link you yourself have shared, it reiterates that only 44 percent of Hindus consider themselves vegetarian.

But keep on bringing arguments out of your rear because it fulfills your agenda.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@EvilBuddha Yes. But eating meat once a week or once a month makes you vegetarian in the eyes of India. Even the article discusses this point.

And anyway the actual point of the argument is that meat dishes are more likely Muslim Indian. The concept of Muslim Indian cuisine is famous and widely documented. This is factual and a non-argument.

If you're going to argue about the ethnic similarities between Muslims and Non-Muslim Indians then you're going to have a hard time. You could write an encyclopedia about the ethnic differences that Muslim communities have.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

But eating meat once a week or once a month makes you vegetarian in the eyes of India. Even the article discusses this point.

LOL.

I prefer vegetarian cuisine but that does not make me a vegetarian. Whatever the 'eyes of India' think about it.

If you're going to argue about the ethnic similarities between Muslims and Non-Muslim Indians then you're going to have a hard time. You could write an encyclopedia about the ethnic differences that Muslim communities have.

This is not just off-topic but also incorrect. Muslims are a religion, not an ethnicity.

There are Arab Muslims, African Muslims, Central Asian Muslims, Caucasian Muslims and Indian Muslims.

Though of course you would say that Indian Muslims are not Indian at all.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Being from California, I didn't know anything about curry (because it's not as famous, but it is slowly making its mark in the States) until I moved to Japan, when I was in the UK, I wasn't interested in it, but now after 25 years it has grown on me, and it's not that bad usually, I am nowhere near an expert when it comes to Indian cuisine, but so far most of it was pretty good, I prefer the more authentic curry than the Japanese curry, but I still don't know the differences between countries like India, Pakistan, Nepal etc...

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I wasn't interested in it, but now after 25 years it has grown on me

Welcome Bass4funk. You will enjoy it here.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Curry" as we know it would not have been possible without the Portuguese first importing many of the spices that were not native to India when they set foot in Goa.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Kobe City is very good for Indian cuisine. Good when you go into a restaurant and Indians are eating there. The cook and staff are Indians.

In Kyoto near the Imperial Palace is a very good Thai restaurant. Has all you can eat. Good curries.

esan.jp

0 ( +2 / -2 )

You can pretty much get good Indian food anywhere. It's hardly the most complicated food to make requiring angel tears and the sweat of a unicorn. Best Ruddy Murray I ate recently was in Sukiya!

https://www.pics.tokyo/works/sukiya-sumibiyaki-horohoro-chicken-curry/

Hardly the deadlock of fine cuisine you see.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Elvis is here

You can pretty much get good Indian food anywhere. It's hardly the most complicated food to make requiring angel tears and the sweat of a unicorn. Best Ruddy Murray I ate recently was in Sukiya!

Most of the country does not have Indian restaurants. Try getting out of Tokyo sometimes. There are none where I live.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

There are none where I live.

That's too bad. You probably don't get much of a chance to eat Indian food then. I get out of Tokyo very often fyi

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Sorry to burst your bubbles but very few of the "Indian" restaurants in Japan are staffed by Indian chefs.

Most are from Nepal.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I had butter chicken last night. Thanks to whomever made it first.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Most of the country does not have Indian restaurants. Try getting out of Tokyo sometimes. There are none where I live.

And yet you point out another city in Japan other than Tokyo that does have Indian restaurants:

*Kobe City is very good for Indian cuisine**. *

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

zibala

Most of the country does not have Indian restaurants. Try getting out of Tokyo sometimes. There are none where I live.

> And yet you point out another city in Japan other than Tokyo that does have Indian restaurants:

> *Kobe City is very good for Indian cuisine*.

There are a total of 4600 Indian restaurants in the country or 0.000036 per person. The majority don't have Indian chefs.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@EvilBuddha

The "obession" you are talking about is a result of th misinformation, almost rampant, and the lobby that defends and supports Muslims. There's nothing else quite like the Muslim lobby.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Thinking about it all night, the best curry I ever had was in 日本橋 before C19. We went back last year but the place had closed. It seems they didn't have enough PMA.!. Very disappointing.

There are a total of 4600 Indian restaurants in the country or 0.000036 per person. The majority don't have Indian chefs.

That's a nice round number. In one of my locals the chefs are Nepalese. That fills the lack of skiledl spicers you see. We used to talk about Joanna and the Gurkhas, what are we like.?.

Was Lumley campaign good for Gurkhas?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-13372026.amp

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Hinduism always says that meat is okay if no alternative...

No such thing, there is no concept of meat in original Hinduism, In the sub-continent you do not have a no alternative scenario, vegetarian food is always available.

The vast majority of Hindus are vegetarian..

Not vast majority, but maybe close to majority, but that number is steadily increasing and will definitely be majority soon..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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