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New cystic fibrosis treatment changing lives

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By Isabelle Tourne

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How horrible. Perhaps massage will also help. The skin is our "Outer Nervous System".

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

How horrible. Perhaps massage will also help. The skin is our "Outer Nervous System".

There is no benefit from massage for the pathology, no possible mechanism could solve this very serious problem by just massaging, nor it have any nervous system component.

Also I have never heard the skin being described as our "outer nervous system", after all there is a very clear role of the usual nervous system fulfilling this role that can't be replace by any other kind of tissue of the skin.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

CF is considered to be very rare in Japan, with an incidence of ~3 per 1 million individuals

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fped.2021.800095/full

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Also I have never heard the skin being described as our "outer nervous system", after all there is a very clear role of the usual nervous system fulfilling this role that can't be replace by any other kind of tissue of the skin.

It is unlikely you would have heard of the skin being described as our "outer nervous system", as this phrase is used by medical professionals as informal medical terminology for laymen to understand.

The peripheral nervous system, which consists of the nerves outside the central nervous system, connects the central nervous system to the skin, for example.

The central nervous system on the other hand is basically comprised of the brain, the spinal cord, and neurons.

Peripheral nerves consist of, among others, sensory nerves.

Hence, the skin being known in informal medical terminology as the "outer nervous system".

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

It is unlikely you would have heard of the skin being described as our "outer nervous system", as this phrase is used by medical professionals as informal medical terminology for laymen to understand.

Still trying to make baseless accusations to taunt the mods? you still can't use imaginary facts you think you know from other people as arguments. If you don't have an argument against the comment you can always skip it instead of making up things.

The peripheral nervous system, which consists of the nerves outside the central nervous system, connects the central nervous system to the skin, for example.

Which completely supports the criticism I made, the nervous system would be then also this "outer nervous system" which makes the distinction irrelevant.

Hence, the skin being known in informal medical terminology as the "outer nervous system".

You just described the nervous system, not the skin. Can you even reference any of the supposed medical professionals you are trying to use as an appeal to authority to describe the skin in this way? because if not then your appeal is also imaginary, the same as what you think other commenters are or do.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Massage is not a cure but a good one helps us feel better.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"There is still no cure for cystic fibrosis," he stressed.

This is a horrible illness often affecting the young.

However the triple-pill treatment taken by Fiant, which is sold as Kaftrio in Europe and Trikafta in the United States, has had a major impact since the U.S. first approved it in 2019.

This is a major step.

Which completely supports the criticism I made, the nervous system would be then also this "outer nervous system" which makes the distinction irrelevant.

No, your mistaken criticism also displayed a lack of knowledge of a basic term.

In a nutshell, for the laymen, the nervous system has two main parts:

*The central nervous system 

*The peripheral nervous system

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/neuro/conditioninfo/parts

Easy to understand the functions of those two main parts (some basic research is necessary to get a deeper understanding).

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

In a nutshell, for the laymen, the nervous system has two main parts:

So once again you just called the nervous system the "outer nervous system" which obviously is an irrelevant distinction.

No mention yet of the skin replacing the nervous system or the supposed medical professionals calling the skin this way.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The sensory nerves in the epidermis serve to sense and transmit heat, pain, and other noxious sensations. When these nerves are not functioning properly they can produce sensations such as numbness, pins-and-needles, pain, tingling, or burning.

3 types of nerves in the skin?

About Peripheral Neuropathy - Symptoms

There are three types of peripheral nerves: motor, sensory and autonomic. Some neuropathies affect all three types of nerves, while others involve only one or two.

Free nerve endings are found in the dermis of glabrous and hairy skin, as well as in muscles, joints, and viscera

4 ( +4 / -0 )

wallaceToday  11:17 am JST

The sensory nerves in the epidermis serve to sense and transmit heat, pain, and other noxious sensations. When these nerves are not functioning properly they can produce sensations such as numbness, pins-and-needles, pain, tingling, or burning.

Excellent description--medical professional quality--and gives us a "feel" for the outer nervous system.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Excellent description--medical professional quality--and gives us a "feel" for the outer nervous system.

Good to see that you now understand it is not the skin itself but the actual nervous system the one that is being described and therefore no need to point out to the skin itself as ifi it was another nervous system. This helps understanding why no medical professionals call it this way, as you mistakenly declared.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Good to see that you now understand it is not the skin itself but the actual nervous system the one that is being described and therefore no need to point out to the skin itself as ifi it was another nervous system. This helps understanding why no medical professionals call it this way, as you mistakenly declared.

I see you did not understand the meaning of epidermis. Basically it is the top layer of the skin. Now with that understanding of a term used by medical professionals you have the understanding of the outer nervous system--again, a term used by medical professionals to describe something to laymen.

So let's look at that quote again that should finally clarify fo you your misunderstanding:

*The sensory nerves in the epidermis** serve to sense and transmit heat, pain, and other noxious sensations.*

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

I see you did not understand the meaning of epidermis. Basically it is the top layer of the skin.

The explanation still contradicts your correction, because it is not the epidermis that is fulfilling the roles of the nervous system, it is the nervous system itself that is simply doing its function in the epidermis.

Now with that understanding of a term used by medical professionals you have the understanding of the outer nervous system--again, a term used by medical professionals to describe something to laymen.

Since you have completely unable to provide any reference where a medical professional use this imaginary term to refer to the skin that means it is still a baseless appeal to authority about something only you personally believed, but could not demonstrate.

The same as when you like to imagine what other people do and accuse them of being or not something you have no idea nor evidence.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The explanation still contradicts your correction, because it is not the epidermis that is fulfilling the roles of the nervous system, it is the nervous system itself that is simply doing its function in the epidermis.

No, you are proven wrong again.

Since you have completely unable to provide any reference where a medical professional use this imaginary term to refer to the skin that means it is still a baseless appeal to authority about something only you personally believed, but could not demonstrate.

You mean like a medical reference from the Center for Neurosurgical&Spinal Disorders with a sentence like:

*Each pair of nerve roots exit the spinal column and branch out into the body forming the peripheral* (outer) nervous system

https://www.spine-brain.com/treatments/treatments-spine/cervical-neck-epidural-injection/

See how this medical professional uses "outer" in exchange for the word "peripheral" so that laymen like us can easily grasp the meaning?

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

No, you are proven wrong again.

No argument? just because you say so? I gave perfectly valid arguments why your understanding is wrong, just saying this is not the case only shows you don't want to accept it even when proved so.

You mean like a medical reference from the Center for Neurosurgical&Spinal Disorders with a sentence like:

*Each pair of nerve roots exit the spinal column and branch out into the body forming the peripheral* (outer) nervous system

Your reference clearly refers to the nervous system, not the skin, so obviously it is not reference that proves the skin is called this way. Once again you are just proving the nervous system itself have an external part, not that the skin is called this way, you just proved my original comment is correct, and your criticism of it meaningless.

See how this medical professional uses "outer" in exchange for the word "peripheral" so that laymen like us can easily grasp the meaning?

Your argument was that the skin is being described as our "outer nervous system", your reference do not say that at all, and since it is the only one you have provided it proves your idea about how the skin was called is after all completely wrong.

Or, do you have any reference that says the skin is called as our outer nervous system?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

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